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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode · 1 year ago

Uptick of Violence in Rochester

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We talk about the uptick of violence and homicides in Rochester and...legal weed.  

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Well, hello and happy Monday to you. This is inside the margins and I am your host, Matt Wilson. While you had a extended weekend because of Good Friday, so hopefully you enjoyed that elongated weekend. Also, some people still have off today and if you do, hopefully you're enjoying your day. If you are out of school, hopefully enjoyed it as well. But news does not have time off, so there's always stuff to talk about and we're going to talk about the violence that's happened in the city, that recently there's been an uptick in violence, and we're going to talk about the discussion on, you know, the violence has been happening versus what's been happening with the prude. Should we also country on also the uptick in violence? Also, we're going to talk about the legalization of marijuana that is now official. What does that mean for our city? And also we're going to talk about the new vaccination locations downtown or in the city of Rochester as well. Let's talk about all that more. But before we get into that, we will talk to someone who also does not rest, because news does not rest. It is so on other voters. Hello and good afternoon to you, Patty. Hi. That yeah, would be nice to get a break. I think you know we've talked a lot about mental health yes, and I think we all this in this city. Need a break for everybody's mental health. Absolutely certainly agree at that. Really okay. So this week in the minority reporter for our headlines Include Legendary Educator Alice Holloway, young received the State Senate's highest honor. In ourcsd news, the district wants comment on the reconfiguration of schools and the improved district finances have boosted the city's credit rating. Legislation or education, which fixes quality of life issues, come to member Jose Po and Monroe County legislator Rachel Bonheart talk about that topic. Rochester's police reform plan puts the city at the starting line for Change. That plan was due to the state on April. First, in National News, Jim Crow in the twenty one century. Republican lawmakers are working to turn back the clock on voting. And more voting news. Voting rights are at stake as the Supreme Court considers an Arizona case. Virginia Governor reach stores the rights of nearly seventyzero felons. And in more local news, the mayor wants to expand home ownership as part of a reparations program. The Police Accountability Board has hired a law firm as the city works on an agreement to release documents. And in editorial, Julian Malveaux writes about a very bad day and ef a Williams is tired of the disrespect Matt. Thanks so much, Pettie. Those are great stories, including that voting stories a huge one right now. So if you want to read the rest of that story and all the other stories that Patty mentioned, go ahead and go over to the minority reporter dotnet get the full versions of the headlines that you just talked about. You will also have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter. You can get the digital or the hard copy version, as totally up to you. I am a subscriber to the minority reporter, so the way that I get my community news and stuff that matters to me. So think you should also take the opportunity to look into that is. Also, if you have any questions or comments for the minor reporter,...

...you can send an email to editor at minority reporter DOTNET. Again, that's editor at minority reporter DOTNET. Day will take a consideration your questions, comments or suggestions. And also, if you have missed any past episodes of inside the margins, can go to our website, which is inside the margins RADIOCOM. Every single episode is there. You can also go to our podcast platforms, which is I heartcom and we're ever you get your podcast. All right. When we come back we will talk about the uptick in violence that we've seen here in Rochester, New York. This is inside the margin. Welcome back to inside the margins and I'm here with Patty. All right, Patty, so let's go ahead and jump into our first topic. Now, there was a lot of press coverage on the death of Stephen Amenhauser. Now, if you don't remember who he was, he was a fifty three year old man who was burned to death. I believe it was to Rochester teens that were charged with that and that was one of fifteen homicides this year in Rochester, New York. There's been, pardon me, there has been an uptick in violence. Now I just want to clarify. Not every single violent act, like like Steven almandhauser's, was gun violence. It was also what happened to him, and vehicle vehicler death as well, or included in that. Vehicle Homicides were included in that as well. Either way, the death rate, in the violent rate is going up tremendously and last year it's that surpassed the year before and we're on track for this year to suppress to surpass last year's. So, Patty, a lot of attention has been given to what happened to Daniel prude and George Floyd, and rightfully so, that those definitely need coverage and we need to address those issues, but I think we also need to focus on the actual the other violence has been happening in our city as well, and so you know, all right, I'll say it. This is it is a hard conversation for us to have and you know we doing this. You know we do this. This is like five radio so we don't have a chance. We're not reading from scripts where we're playing off what each other says. So this pauses. There's backing up, there's clarifications, is things like that. One of the things that I guess distresses me as all as a white female in Rochester is I see and I hear and I cover a lot of protests. We get, you know, press releases, news conferences, things like that for or agencies organizations that protest when black lives come to bad ends with police. Right, but there are, sadly, in our community and others, very many black lives coming to bad ends not at the hands of police. Absolutely correct. And how do we get those the attention they also deserve? Not Every police encounter goes bad, and I'll say this right as a as a late middle aged white female, I understand. I am not. I don't fear my life with at a police encounter. I'll say that up front. I was taught my whole life growing up, from the from the s s all the way on. I'm in trouble, I seek a police person. Well, there were female they're in a position felt me. I understand. There are people who do not have that experience. I appreciate that there are people who don't have that experience. More people need to have the experience that I have of if I'm in trouble, I'm going to go look for somebody in a uniform. Right. All that being said, there is a tremendous amount of violence where citizens are committing...

...violence against each other. That has got to be talked about, and the police can help solve those. Yeah, you know, they they have a role in that. What is that rule going to be? We as we reimagine. You know, we've talked about this public safety. What is public safety? That is people need to not fear the police. They need to also not fear somebody's going out for a walk. One of these homicides was someone that Rochester police say was hit by a stray bullet. Fifty nine year old man. Not, according to a news release, not the intended not believe to be the intended target. What about that life? That that that's all I'm saying. They we have in this city, in this county. There are seven one hundred thousand lives in this country. We have to have public safety that protects as many of those as we possibly can right now. I did, we've and we had a conversation about this topic off air before we did our show today. And it's complicated, because you're right, it's you can't get the images of what happened to George Floyd or prude out of your head, especially if you watch those videos as full, especially and especially with Floyd right that one's even harder to watch because you see this guy with his knee on this dude's neck and, you know, with his hands in his pocket. It just it's a it's a bad look. And if you're someone like me, again, I'm older. I'm in my mid forty, so I'm not I'm not what you would describe as a young black man and anymore. I'm pretty much on that Middle Age section now. I don't want to admit that, but it's true. But but, yeah, I'll go on. But I've had issues and I've talked about before. I've bet issues in the past with police. I've been unjusttly pulled over and Frisk and search for reasons that I could not understand, especially when you're just trying to deliver the paper and people think I'm robbing house, as I never understood that, but again, I was a new black person to a mostly white neighborhood, you know, and that's to me that that kind of seemed that was the reason. So I get the frustration that there is with the police, with police, and we do have to reimagine policing. However, you make a great point. We still need to be safe within our city right because it's obvious we still have a problem with violent crime. And not only do we selve a problem, it's getting worse, it's getting the violent crimes in downtown and in the city overall are getting worse and sometimes we seem to neglect or not want to put our our eyes on what's going on right in front of us with this kind of crime. And that's still very important because, yes, the policing effects your day to day life, but some as your your regular dayday activities. I should not fear going to, you know, my friend's house in the city and I am getting killed by a stray bullet right that should not be a fear that I have in my day to day life. It has to be addressed, it has to be it has to be important making sure that we do something about the the actual regular day to day violence that we're seeing. Again, as Patty and I just mentioned, it is only April, fourth right, and we are already at fifteen homicides. That is ridiculous. We're not, you know, that is a ridiculous I even halfway through the year, yet it's so it's we got to make sure that we're focus on that too, and we got it. We got to see what we can do about stopping or slowing that down, and we do eat to work with the people that are that are out there to protect and serve and keep us safe. And as I was talking to you about, Patty, I want to get your thoughts on this too. The reason why...

I think there's so much focus on the police as is, as we already mentioned, the police are supposed to protect, to serve you. So if the people that are supposed to protect you are causing you harm, and not only that, I think even more importantly, when leadership tries to deceive you or not let you know exactly what happening and hides things from you, that makes the that makes another that's another layer of trust issues that that we have with people in power and our local government. But that's still should not overshell the fact that there's a the we have a violence issue in the city and we need to address it. I think that had city officials said on March thirty of two thousand and twenty we had an in custody incident. It happened on much twenty three. The man involved died a week later and started talking about it then. I don't know that where where we are right now. I agree with you that I think that we have had a woeful lack of leadership. Tim Curtin the Corporation Council, who was taken to task in the report from Andrew Selley, the report commissioned by City Council, he announced it was Friday that he's going to be leaving city employment as a believe this June thirty and he's going to go into into private practice. You know, he's been criticized up and down sideways, front and back for his his actions or inaction in that other people, according to that report, knew. According to the report, a city council person had been contacted and I believe, in August and didn't say anything. So there's a there's a there's a lot of blame to go around for not coming clean with this and a think we talked about this before. It feels to me. It feels like I've been cheated on. Yeah, good, that's you. I found out that the person I trusted cheated on me. Right, right, and and where do I go with that? You know, I'm I'm wounded. Right, I'm hurt. Exactly quite that. Yep. So if if we knew a year ago, not just five or six months ago, are we in a completely different plate? And we've talked about this. If the world knew about Daniel proved on March thirty or we even having a trial in Minneapolis right now? Right, yeah, then that's the that's what makes this such a I mean, it's obviously sad that someone lost her lies, but this make it just adds more sadness to it that that for some reason our leadership decided to hide this and and sweep it under and just pretended it's not even like there was anything about it. They they kind of just wanted to script in a rug and that let anyone know about it, and that's I think that's that is one of the major problems. Is that right there? You know, and obviously what happened again was not it was a terrible thing too, but you just add that on top of that and that's where all this distrust comes from. But I think because we're focusing on that so much, sometimes we lose sight of what's also happening, which is almost daily. Were report that we have reports in the news. If we're not talking about the actual deaths from homicide, we're still talking about someone being shot or stabbed or going to the hospital with stab wounds or bullet wounds or being jumped or fight. There's so much of violence and it's daily, because I don't write for the for anything, but I do report news also, and it's there's almost always something reported about a violent crime and that's happened and we have we have to look at this.

Well, and the thing is to people would say, okay, well, stop reporting about it. Well, it's still going to happen. Yeah, and so if you guys so it's you know, it's a tough situation for the news media to be in. Do we report every stabbing and shooting to show what then it makes it seem like all anybody's doing this town were stabbing and shooting each other, that that's not that's not true. But if you don't report it it, then everybody thinks everything's Hunky Dory. That's now. That's to me. That's right. Why we need to pick team? Why do we need a fifteen? Everything's Hunky Dory. We don't. We don't have a problem. So there's this balance. Do you do you report every one of these? Do you do a weekly round up? What was it this we like, like, you know, covid numbers. Right, at least to have covid numbers for the day or for the week. Do we have? Do we have a topeboard? You know what's the shooting in the stabbing this week? So people know. People get numbed to numbers. One of the one of the let's say, problems. A couple years ago a lot of attention paid to opioid overdoses. Yes, numbers went up, lots of numbers. The public stopped paying attention to the numbers they did. You're right, right, opioid overdoses, I think there were in March. I want to say there were fifty seven overdoses, twelve of them fatal in March, but you don't see a lot of those numbers anymore now. Maybe Covid, you know, surpass them. But even when, even before Covid, even before we were writing about a lot of these shootings, people weren't really reading number stories. They want to read about people. This is how are people being affected by this? So you know, how are people being affected by gun violence? EBE. That's something that the media needs to have a the sounds flip. I don't mean to be like a family a week. How is this family affected right by this? And then? But there's going to be a sameness to that. Are we just so inerd to this at this is the way it is. What is going to make us say stop? Is it a man who, in his house, is burned to death? Yeah, right, it is. It does what does? What does that do? Is that going to say this is just absolutely out of control? Yeah, you know, I want to speak to this too, because I know you and I both talk a lot about mental health on this show and like, as I said, last year the numbers increase a lot in this year the numbers are already pretty high. Speaking of numbers, but obviously last year and this year covid was a big factor in everyone's life and I wonder if the mental stresses of Covid come into play with the uptick in the violent crimes as well, everyone being kind of stuck in their homes and that not being able to be out and about what their friends, families and loved ones. I wonder if that, I don't I have any numbers, obviously for me about that, but I just wonder if that has a has anything to do with that that increases. Well, you know, maybe I think that when when the pully please chief holds a news conference or or the mayor speaks, or or officials who try to stop violence talk, they talk about ways in which to solve disputes and the the default way to solve with dispute for many people is a violent way. It is not conversation, it's not we're going to agree to disagree walk away. There's for some for some people there's a violent resolution to that dispute. You know, I don't know.

Do you see? How do you see? You start with kindergarteners, you know, high and there are there are, you know, the Senate for Dispute Settlement. There are organizations in the city that do try to teach people how to resolve conflict without violence. But does that? There's two two news releases. I will want to share from the past, please, please do so. We talked about police. So this one came out on Friday April second and this is about one of the recent shootings. So this came out Friday April second at approximately for forty PM, officers responded to the area of cottage street in Genesee Street for the report of a male shot. This is from our PD. On a rival office, is located a fifty four year old male city resident suffering from at least one gunshot wound and presenting with life threatening injuries. Officers provided emergency first day to the victim. The victim was transported by ambulance to strong or he was rushed into surgery. He is currently considered to be in critical but stable condition. Again, this is as of Friday right right the first day provided to the victim at the scene by police, according to attending physicians, sustain the victim's life until he could be treated at strong the investigators continuing. As of Friday, there were no suspects in in custody. So every well, the chief has started every week to send out a media brief. It's titled Update on Anti Violence Efforts from RPD. Chief Harriet Sullivan. So this was on the first day? Was that? That was Thursday? That was Thursday. Yes, she writes many cities across the northeast or seeing a rise in violence. Troubling trend that must be stopped in its tracks. She writes it. On the twenty five she held a news conference. I want the community to know that violence of any kind is unacceptable. As chief I am wholeheartedly dedicated to reducing and ultimately eliminating violent crime in Rochester and have already begun to take direct action. So just this previous weekend you may have seen them out there adding foot and bike patrols to target locations based on real time data and analytics. Also increasing anti violence details in areas that have store has have historically seen the highest quantities of violent crime. So the updated strategy also involves targeting those are the history of gun violence, looking at those are the history of committing violent acts, ensuring those who need it are connected to wrap around services through facet pick and fit. So one of the things I want to go back to on this when I first read this is we will be adding foot and bike wichrose to target locations based upon real time data and analytics. So help me out here, Matt. There is a cry in the in this city that says certain neighborhoods are overpoliced. IRA, black and Brown egg. I know this is going already. There are going to be details based on real time data and analytics, that they're going to be foot and bike patrols and targeting locations where there are issues. But they're going to be details in areas it has historically seen the highest quantities of violent crime. Damned if you do and damned if you don't. What do you do? Y? Yes, some communities are over policed. Should everybody be stopped if a tail light's broken? But what I hear from people I know in law enforcement is when you stop the broken tail light, when you stop the car for speeding, sometimes you find the illegal gun. Yeah, it's and do you say? Well, like what? What are they supposed to do? It is like the most dysfunctional marriage I think I've...

...ever seen in my life. Right it's we don't want police involvement or we want less police involvement. We're on but we're also crying for more police involvement, more help. It's petty. You hit the nail and it's tough it's tough to find that balance. I'm not I'm not laughing because it's funnycause it's not funny. It's just it's hard to digest what you just said. Where there's there's Christ to hey, you know, defund the police and back off with police involvement, but now there's like, Hey, we need more police involvement because crimes are going up. So what do you do? What do you what do we actually want? It's like we are asking for two completely different things, but we want results and it's it's hard. It's hard to find the right answer to this. I don't have an answer to this. I do know. All I can tell you is I I've said it since day one on this show and I will continue with you say I we need police. You can't get rid of police. And no matter how much you think it's a good idea to eliminate police and just have forces of public safety, people who are just going to talk and help, there are people who are going to commit violent crimes no matter what you do. It's that's just part of life and you have to have people who are out there who are trained to respond and handle people who are committing violent crimes. You have to have that. If you do not, people who commit violent crimes will continuously do it and not be put away or have any, you know, negative consequences for doing what they're doing. So we have to find that balance of okay, we don't want what would happen to George Floyd happening to our to people. You don't want someone with a knee on the neck for nine minutes and emt saying hey, this guy's down, should we do something, and he's like now I'm going to keep them down. We don't want that. But we do need police and we have to understand this. If you don't have police, violent crowns are going to continues to go up and there's gonna be no one to stop them. So in her her last sentence on this she says I want to reinforce at the entire police department, will continue doing everything within our power to protect the citizens of Rochester and want to work collaboratively with you to identify meaningful solutions. So yeah, that goes to what to we're saying what what are the solutions? There was up study that came out last week that funding for our PD had increased over a period of time and it showed that crime had gone down in that period of time. Is there a relationship the more you fund the less crime you have? I don't know. Can we put the money into other avenues that can reduce crime? Sure we can. Of course we can, and we probably should be funding job opportunities for for children and young adults, absolute and education. Of course we should be doing that. But in a in an era where everybody wants, to quote the chief, real time data and analytics, we have to see, we have to measure everything to see what what's working, what needs to be adjusted or what needs to be to be scrapped. But yeah, I agree with you, Matt. I mean public safety is abroad topic. It is absolutely right what and you're going to define it based on your your biases, in your in your in your wishes. So within the definition of public safety there is room for police, there's room for job training, there's room for Behavioral Mental Health Counselors, there's room for a lot of things in public safety. Yep, absolutely agree, and I think you and I, even...

...when we first start talking a lot of this, even before a lot of of the details about prude or anything happen. Ever, happened. You know, I had already been talking about mental health and something that's always been kind of not looked at as deeply as it is now. I guess it still needs to be looked at more deep more in depth, and I think you're right. That's an avenue where we can do better. We can learn more about mental health issues and how to approach people who are mentally ill or are going through an episode and see the best ways to keep everyone safe. These are things that need to be done and no, I don't think anyone's going to disagree with that. But we also have to understand, you know what, if there's no one out there to stop people doing bad crimes or violent crimes, guess what's going to happen, Pattie? Violent crimes because no one's out there to stop them from doing the violent crimes. You have to understand that exactly. And with mental health. People in the mental health field will say that people with a diagnosed mental illness and more likely to harm themselves. Then that's the people right, but there are, but there are lots of lots of people who are walking around in some way, shape or form psychically wounded or not not well, and those individuals need to know that there were some services for them, not just the services we seem to have. It seems you have to somehow involve the system to get services right. There nine and one. Mental health distress, I use suicidal maybe, and then everybody shows up. What about people who just are having a series of bad days, where they go yeah, yeah, Yep, a series of bad days can lead to a series of bad events. Right. So, yeah, that's a bit it's a very good point. Well, Patty, I know this is a discussion we're going to continuously have. I it and it's a I think you and I both agree. It's a tough discussion, right, because there's everyone. There's right now, as you, as you said, said, most the city, a lot of the people, the Patroos of of our city feel like they were done wrong by leadership and they have almost zero trust in leadership right now. So they want to scrap everything. They're calling for everything to be scrapped. However, you can't just not have leadership and you can't you can't just not have people to help you keep your neighborhood safe. Even though you may distrust everybody, you still need their help. So we got to find that balance of okay, how do we build that trust back and how do we keep everyone safe? I wonder if people on various floors of City Hall appreciate the Metaphor of that. They they cheated on us, they broke our hearts. Yeah, yeah, on all floors of City Hall, I wonder if there is this appreciation of the fact that their actions are in actions. Broke a trust with people and just getting that back, not just so can you trust police? Can I trust what my elected officials are telling me? MMM Yeah, yeah, that that's that's tough. You know, will endit here, Patty, and then we'll take a break and going turn up next topic. You know, I know you remember this too, right. So, when you first heard about George Floyd, there were people that, I know we're all that I'm so happy that was something that would never happen in our city. There's I'm so happy that we would never see anything like that happen at our city. And then, guess what, it happened in our city and three months earlier it happened, not even afterwards. So so when people were saying that we're the people who knew what had happened, going Oh, were. I was gonna say another word,...

...but you know, we don't have a run big enough right now. Yep, and realize that they were they were holding a chicking time bomb and they were just trying to see how long they can hold it before it exploded. I think you're I think you're right. I think you're absolutely right. All right, all right, okay, I'm sure there's to be more to come on this and will I we're going to continue to talk about this, the violence and everything. Hopefully we can see some changes and we can see that that upward ticks starts spiraling downward a little bit. All right, Patty. So we talked about it last show that it was only a matter of time before it happened. And guess what? It happened. Patty, weed is legal. So what does that mean for people right now? And how and when will you be able to legally purchase we we will talk about all of that coming up after this break. This is inside the margins. You're listening to inside the margins. One under point nine, W xire extreme independent radio and Rochester's urban alternative station. Welcome back to inside the margins. All right, so, Patty, we talked about this last week that the fact that it was pretty much imminent that marijuana was going to be legalized. And guess what? Weed is now legal. When I say legal, I mean recreational use of marijuana. Medical marijuana had already been legalized it to an extent, but now recreational marijuana is now legal. So some things you can do right now, other things you're going to have to wait a little bit for, Patti, and that's my understanding. Oh Joy, you know I did. So one of the things is was talked about tax revenue with and this is a something I don't understand and hopefully things will become clear. Basically, really not. This really is going to make over the next year. This is going to ramp up. So you're really can't. You can't go out tomorrow and go by some week. It's going to take its voute. I think April, first two, twenty two, I think, is when you'll be able to this is really gonna be visible. So one of the things that the mayor wants to do with her reparations program is to use tax revenue that will come to the city through marijuana legalization. Talking about you know this. This text, this text stream presents an opportunity to think about things like reparations, to think about a universal basic income, to think about programs that can fund homeownership, things like that. I all good things that should be discussed. Sure, I it makes me sound like I'm, you know, a prohibitionist by saying why are we looking at these things through syntaxes, for lack of a better yace. Okay, so and and isn't this won't. So. One of the things reasons for legalizing is that minority communities affected by again, we talked about over policing drug you know, minor drug offenses. Really know, nobody's heard in this but they've been you know, you have a couple a couple joints, a couple of months you're arrested and your record and the whole edgings can scaped from them. Right. So, PAT, couple years ago we're got to expunge those records and now with legalization we want to put opportunities in communities that have been overpoliced, just proportionately affected by drug is shue marijuana issues and try to make that right. I can't get past the...

...fact that these communities will be exploited. Yeah, I know we talk. I did I we talked about this last week. I'm it's somebody explained to me how how that won't be exploitation involved in this, because I I'm I guess I'm stuck on that and I guess I need to see exactly how this is going to work. So the revenue is going to be divided. Municipalities will get some tax revenue, and I want to say that it is three percent to a municipality in one percent to the county. Now, if you opt out, if you'RE A municipality ups out, you will not get any of the any of the taxes here. So cities, towns and villages can opt out of allowing adult use cannabis retail dispensaries. They have to do that by the end of this year, or nine months after the effective date of the legislation. So by December you may be seeing some communities opting out of this. If you live in I'm going to make this up because I don't know Hilton. I've no idea what Hilton's going to do. Have no idea what gates is going to do. No idea what Palmer is going to do, Henry, Rietta, Penfield, we don't know. Right they can opt out of that. So the tax revenue, forty percent will go to education. Forty percent to community grants reinvestment fund. Not Quite true. What that is? Twenty percent to drug treatment and Public Education Fund. So twenty percent, the least amount, is going to drug treatment, M and Drug Education Funds. This is like to me. To me, this reminds me of the tobacco settlement years ago. MMM Right. It was supposed to go to prevent for smoking related issues. Often it went to the General Fund. New York is broke people. Hey, covid cover her hoy did a number on finances. Yeah, that's a fact. That is a fact. So what is a community grants reinvestment fund? What's that going to look like? Forty percent to education? Is that going to mean that that will make districts whole? Or because the state, you know, the things called this, different types of state aid. Does that mean they're going to not get down in one area and have this cover it? You know this forty percent? I don't know. This been very confusing to me. So, but is this also the state's share? So what happens to the city? What happens at that three percent or one percent that goose to the municipality or the county. What are they going to do with it? Yeah, yeah, and again, I'm sorry, I'm a broken record. People should not be exploited for this. Yeah, and you know, I guess in my neighborhood I'd like to see more places to go buy some fruits and vegetables. Then they have a cannabis dispensary open up. I hope this one doesn't open up in my neighborhood. I just yeah, for a lot of reasons, I hope it doesn't. Over the fact of of we don't have a in my nineteen world neighborhood and really is not a good place to go buy some vegetables. Yeah, no, I hear you now. I think I kind of explained how I feel on this whole thing last week as well. I think I'm still kind of where I was. I'll explain briefly if if you missed it. So for the criminal acts aspect of it, I'm for this because I do think that it should be decriminalized. I do think that people who have had...

...the records tarnished because they had a, like you said, a couple joints or a couple blunts or arrested or something like that. That should not affect your livelihood. I don't think I'm again, I am not. I want to make sure this is I'm saying. There's the record. I'm not a weed smoker, so it's not like I'm excited because I get to smoke a join or something. That's not to think of that that I partaken. However, I still kind of put it on the same line as alcohol, because they're alcohol is also devastated and continues to devastate many lives. Right a lot of people do find themselves becoming alcoholics or having issues with alcohol or Gwi or all types of other problems with alcohol, and it's legal and it has been for quite some time. So I think I think it's I think it's the everyone says, a lot of people have said that marijuana is the gateway drug. I think alcohol the gateway drug. I think once you have had a few drinks in you, your inhibitions begin to kind of soften and you are you are more willing to do things that you may have not been more willing to do before you were integrated with autohol. So I think, in my opinion, alcohol usually leads to a lot of other things. It's not. It's not marijuana. So on a criminal and on a criminal aspect, on that side, I think it's fine. Now I'm going to what you said about the exploitation. I'm with you there because you're because, just like I don't want to see a liquor store on the corner of every block, I don't know if I want to see we dispense me on the corner of Free Block either. You're absolutely right, because that's going to make people more willing to go to those stores or dispensaries to get that instead of doing other things. And you know a lot of people spend. I think I mentioned before last week two patty that cigarettes are what, ten dollars a pack? Now, eleven dollars like that? Yeah, something like that. So if you're not if you're working a minimum wage job and you're not making that much and you're having trouble paying your rent, but you're still buying a pack of cigarettes every day, right, what is what is that? Seven days a week? That's seventy bucks a week. And if you have those nights where you go out and have a few drinks, you baby smoke more. So you throw those on top of that. So now and your three hundred dollar a week paycheck, you're spending a hundred of it on cigarettes. How much of that now is going to go to marijuana if you're buying the legal version, because I'm assuming the legal versions probably be a little more sponsor than this, the street version. You understand what you know? I have to all those all that, all those taxes. Yet the thing too, that with alcohol. So if I walk by the door of the bar, if the bar is the doors open. It summer I met you, I may smell the alcohol, but there is a you know, there is a serious pollution effect with smoking marijuana. This is what I mean. If you want gummies, if you want all that stuff, I don't want to smell cigarette smoke. I don't want to smell marijuanas. It's a it's a quality of life, it's an air quality. It's a neighborhood issue. Oh, I mean, I live in a neighborhood where the wind is blowing a certain in direction, the local barbecue joint waists over, and that also can be you know, it's an air quality, air pollution. Hey, I like I like Barbecue Patty. Come on now, issue well, but you want to smell stale Barbecue's works from all day long. Right. No, it's one thing when the neighbor you would you're growing out. It's another thing when there's an establishment that is in a neighborhood doing that at all. Do So. I mean if we I sound like get off my lawn, you kids, get off my lawn, get off my law. But again, you know, we...

...go back to the story from this week's mine already report. Right, education or legislation which fixes quality of life issues. Jose Peyo was talking about dirt bikes and Rachel Barnhart was talking about fireworks. HMM, smelling weed in the corner is a quality of life issue. So question for you. I guess this is just I'm throwing us out he because my wife also the same thing. She hates the smell cigarette smoke. She hates the smell of marijuana smoke, and I do too. I'm not really smoking, the smoking are is annoying and I don't like it. And so if they made smoking marijuana illegal but they legalize like the gummies and the brownies or whatever else they do, would you still have a problem with it or no, I'd have less of a problem with it okay, I mean medical marijuana. It's not. Is Not smokable, right. It's all these other forms, tinctures and things like that. Like in a a medical form, I would have less of a problem with it. It's you'll lot. It's just the smoking really really bothers me. We also we don't know about lung disease. No, that's true. That's her from smoking and we gotta cause more of a problem that our health system that also is broke, is it going to be able to, you know, to to cover, to deal with how many? How many more lung related diseases are we going to have? Right, nope, no, again, it's all the portraymaker valid. I guess. My my thought. I'm on the wait and see side of this, because if if we see marijuana legalized and we see drug related crime go down, then I think it's a win and that that's that's kind of how I look at it. But if that's not the case, then another conversation that will have to add. Right. So, so maybe maybe some of the violence we're seeing, and I don't know, there's maybe some of the violence we're seeing is marijuana dealers are fighting with each other, but we still have a big yeopioid problem. That's yeah, that's so. So the marijuana. So they're out of the marijuana business, but did they go into the pill business? Yeah, at you know, dat it look at, let's quote the chief data and analytics. We're going to have to get a boatload of thads to see if this is if this is if the consequences are the intended ones or what coming up with unintended ones? If we come up with unintended ones, how do we address those? Right? Nope, I guess I think it's I think it's fair and I just want to wait and see. I'm I'm not. I guess I'm not. I'm a grumpy old man, but I'm not a good off your old my long red helmet. Yes, all right, patty, we are running at a time. Obviously you did another stellar job, so thank you so much for be with me today. They just want to remind everybody all the headline news that you heard Patty talk about, including the whole voting issue that's going on and it's a big story everywhere. They have a story about that in the minority reporter. You could check that out and all the other headlines at minority reporter dotnet. Get the full versions there. Also, you will have an option to subscribe to the minority reporter. You can get the like I said before, you get the digital or the hard copy with whatever your preference is. It's a great way to keep yourself informed on stories, it issues that matter to you most. So go ahead and take advantage of that opportunity. And also, we love feedback. We have to hear from you. So if you have any comments, questions, suggestions for the minority reporter, you ahead and submit an email to them at editor at minority reporter DOTNET. Again, that's editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And if you're just tuning in right now, Ow, you missed the show. What's wrong with you? But that's all right. You can go to inside the margins RADIOCOM. Every single episode of inside the margins going to be found there. Also, we are on all podcast formats, including iheart and wherever...

...you get your podcast. So, Patty, I'm assuming they'll be some news going on this week. So how about we do this again next Monday and let's try to remember to talk about the Covid vaccine sites that are that are open charity starting this Thursday. The you can go to the WW DOT Monroe County dotgovn sign up for those. They are targeted to fifteen zip codes in the city where vaccination rates are far below those of the rest of the county. Yeah, these are supposed to be stay dedicated. Unlike the Hawkeye site, these are supposed to stay dedicated to city residents. So let's be tracking that and see how well that that works out. Next to the point I wanted to get into. That today we just ran a time. We'll definitely talk about that next week. Be One of the first topics we're talking about. All right, Patty, let's get out of here for Patty Singer. I am Matt Wilson. This is inside the margins. Will see you next week. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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