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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode · 1 year ago

Vaccinating Rochester

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We talk vaccination sites in Rochester, the uptick in Covid cases and the concept of policing. 

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson, and Hello, welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I am your host, Matt Wilson, coming off of a pretty decent weekend. The weather is looking good. I think winter is finally behind us, but you never know. And upstate New York. All right, we got a busy show as usual. We're going to talk about the recent spike in covid numbers, especially within younger people, and we're going to talk about why we think that is. Also, we're going to talk about vaccination clinics, of vaccination hubs within the city. We're going to go kind of dive into that and see what's gone on with that. And also we're going to talk about a lawsuit being brought to the Mare and the police by free the people rock. But before we do any of that, let's go ahead and bring it someone that I personally am not suing. It's the minor recorders, patty singer. Hello and get morning to you, Patty. Oh my gosh, thanks for that, man. I I kind of appreciate that. Hope nobody else is going to soon as either. No, I would never see your patter. You know that. Thank you. Thank you very much. I will have to get you for breach of contract on the pizza things, but some point, you know the meal you owe me. You can collect Souon, I promise. Thanks all right. So our headlines for this week, as we talked about, and will go into a little more detail, covid nineteen vaccine clinics have come to each of the city's quadrants. Rochester Institute of Technology Seeks a grant that would put public art in historical context. The city has announced that Corporation Council Tim Curtain will leave as of June thirty. A bipartisan committee will study high speed Internet access in Monroe County. In some National News, American corporations are forced to take sides in the voting rights battle. The son of Jesse Jackson will help deal with the high costs of prison phone calls. In more local news, the person in crisis team underscores the general lack of mental health resources. The city and the police department are hit by a class action lawsuit to stop excessive force and racial profiling, and in opinion this week the Reverend Michael Vaughan says no to reparations, and Howard Eagle and a wise right about the race commission leaders. They say it is continued unprincipled behavior. Matt, thank you so much, Patti. Is Always and as always, you can get the full versions of those headline stories that you just heard on the minority reporter dotnet. So make sure you go to minority reporter dotnet. The full versions of those stories are available there. You will also have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter. I subscribe personally to it. I believe it's a great way to keep myself informed and get the stories that matter to me most involving my community, and I think that's a way for you as well. So definitely take advantage of that opportunity to get the digital or the hard copy version if you'd like. Also, we always like feedback, so if you have any comments, questions or suggestions, you can submit an email to editor at minority reporter DOTNET. Again. That's editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And, of course, if you've missed any past episodes of inside the margins, you can go to our website, which is inside the margins RADIOCOM.

Also you can find US wherever you get your podcast. I heard spotify, wherever. Doesn't matter where you go, we are out there. All right. I know Patty and I want to dive into this last week. So we're going to start off with this. The vaccination hubs, the quadrants for those clinics. Let's go ahead and get into that and see what that's all about. This is inside the margins. Welcome back to inside the margins and I am here with Patty. I'm okay, Patty, I know we ran a little we rid of the time last week. We want to dive into this. The vaccination clinics in the city. Looks like they've broken it off into quadrants. I know there were some issues with interstity people trying to get their vaccinations. So what slightly information that you have on these clinics that are in the in the city? Well, I mean they're they're set up at this point through through April. It a lot of clinics are depending on the back scene supply. They were at the beginning. So this was they now, I guess two weeks ago. Time Fly. So every Thursday there's the news conference that kind of executive and health commissioner have. So not the past one but the one before that. I asked why did it take fifteen weeks to get this set up? quadrants to the for the city, and you know, you hear about well, they don't know what the supply is, but you know they were setting things up for the Dome, setting things up for the Convention Center. They had these pop up clinics that they were using at churches and some other sites in the city, these kind of one offs to to get people, you know, in targeted areas and they were working with some community organizations to get people there. And those were really I don't want to say invitation only, but for lack of a better phrase, that was it. They was set up and they would go to a particular group and say we're going to have is here and they weren't really open to the public right as you would think of vaccination clinic should be, if that, if that makes any sense. So you know they're setting these up at the Dome and setting them up else where. You you know what. You get a sense on. I think it's on Friday or the weekend. They get the allocation for the following week. So they have a sense. As time will go by, you know how much they're going to get. The county has been adamant. Bellow has been adamant that he wanted to have an infrastructure set up. He wanted his infrastructure to deliver of vaccines, to exceed the number of vaccines St Right. You want to be ready to go so they could get as many as they could and show that they were delivering, because apparently the state rewards efficiency. If you get an allotment and you are able to distribute and administer that allotment, you get that allotment or perhaps more the next time. It's basically you're you get an allotment on performance. If you're faltering, you're going to get less vaccine because you're showing you can't, you can't administer what you have and sorry, who's more efficient will get it right. So, which makes sense. But I guess I still don't get why the city sites weren't in the mix from the beginning. Maybe they were, maybe just wasn't communicated well publicly, but it just struck me that fifteen weeks in now we have sites set up in the city. Now, to go back, people may remember well there was some controversy over the Hawkeye site, which is a state and federal combination the city. City residents in the same zip codes had a week's head start on making appointments and there was a great effort the weekend before to get people to you know, to leaflet neighborhoods and to tell people was there and to get them to sign up to get as many of the appointments as possible. So it took a week. In a week, residents of the city zip Cos it was targeted got about Elevenzero...

...of those appointments that were there for the for the month or so right when they opened it up to the rest of the county, fourteen thousand appointments went in hours. Right. So on this one, you know, I've got to I've got to agree with with the mayor on this that there wasn't enough time for serious she was she was right about this. You know that it's people in the city needed more time for a variety of reasons. Yeah, so you know, at that time. Were they working on these, on these quadrants things? I don't know. Here's some background information that I will really do people so they can get the information that I get on on background. Okay, why it's a tear. Some background or why it took so long to launch clinics in each quadron of Rochester. Establishing neighborhood critics was advocated for by the Vaccine Task Force and outline in its equity guidelines early on, but the approach was delayed by vaccine shortages and New York state's approach to managing the limited supply by restricting the vaccinators and who they could vaccinate. So apparently this was managed. The vaccination process was a top down was top down managed by the state. They were telling who could that, who could be the vaccinators and who they could vaccinate. So people had a localities how to follow that protocol. Again, I guess I don't know. I'm buying it and I'm not buying it. I would supply increased bat I'm back to the background. Yeah, supply increasing and weekly allocations becoming predictable and vaccinators being given the green light by the state to vaccinate everyone instead of restricted categories. We now have more local control over how to distribute vaccine and with us able to follow through on the Pod, which is point of delivery strategy, and city neighborhoods. Here I go good radio again, shrugging and yeah, I mean, I get it and I don't get it, but I just think that this should have been worked out from the beginning and I will I will maintain it should not have taken fifteen weeks to set this up. I guess that's that's my bottom line. Fifteen weeks is a long time to go through the vaccination process, to have these in the city, when you were talking equity from the get go. Above this is where you and I agree completely. Yep, if you're if your narrative is going to be equity, if that's your narrative, that's the point that you want to push up to the public, then your priority should be to set up those sites in the city. Right. If you're setting him up further away where inner city people don't have the means or transportation to get out that far, you're kind of cutting off a certain population from having access to the vaccine. So you and I are remote on this one. Totally, Patty, especially if that's your in if that, if you're just like hey, we're going to do what we can and whatever site was, the white size we get, we'll get and then we'll work on it from there. Fine, but your narrative was equity is the most important thing. We want to make sure that people who are under underrepresented, it upper underrepresented, get the opportunity to get the vaccine. So you would think that your priorities would be within the city, because that because you want to give those people the easiest access to get vaccinated. So you're I agree with you a hundred percent on that. I don't think that's the the right approach to that. That we had here. So someone will argue, well, we had the convention center. Yes, we did, which is not that far from the Transit Center. Yeah, you know people, we saw there was something in the city. But if your point is now you want to go into the quadrants, I guess, and you know really, why are we discussing this? It's it's over. It isn't. That is like we can't turn back time, right. But I guess the point is, couldn't you have taken some of the allocation from the Dome Arina and some of the advocation from the Convention Center and some of the allocation from the Fleet Center on Paul Road and use that to set up these these locations in the city. I don't have the answer to that question. I if you if...

...you're getting if you're getting. I'm going to make this up, making up this number right, if you're getting five thousand doses a week into Monroe County and I are you doing? Are you putting twenty five hundred at the at the Dome, two thousand at the Convention Center and you know x number at Fleet Center? Can't you take a hundred from each of those and put them some place outs again, I don't know that. We just need to put it. Would it make it seem with that scatter it too much? I don't know, but I'm just saying I'm a broken record. It just seemed to me to be a long time and we'll have to see what the numbers are. So I was finally smart see if I stored it on my dud. Always like it. I can get to it. So on April Eighth I did a screen grab on the states covid vaccine tracker M to see what the what the percentage of the overall population is, for for a blacks and Latinos. For the Tino's it was about five percent already been vaccinated. From blacks it was about eight percent either way. Kept fluctuating right. So we're going to see if I remember, Matt, so up to you to remind me every every week, every Thursday, because that's when these start. They're RS. Yeah, do another screen grab to see what the percentages are, to see if the numbers, the percentages are of minorities are going up as a percentage of all the people being vaccinated. Yeah, in the county and let's see if this is working. Now, common ground health and the black physicians network and others have started a speakers bureau to go into neighborhoods, communities groups, whatever you want to call it, to talk about the vaccine, to give accurate information, to answer questions. We'll see if we'll see what difference this makes over time. Yeah, Nope, I agree. It's it's certainly the numbers. When you look at the numbers for Latino and African Americans versus other populations, are still definitely disparity and I know we kind of touched on this a little bit. Obviously I do think access was definitely an issue. Also, I still do think that they're still as a distrust and in some circles and communities and in regards to the virus, to the vaccine. So you're right, I'm I am very curious. I now that there is more access available, access is easier for these communities to get the vaccine. I want to see if that is going to show an influx in the numbers of numbers actually go up. If they still don't, that we know that there's a different kind of problem exactly. And on Saturday the mayor in the county executive were at the Chreton, Pamela Jackson, our center to talk about vaccine, to encourage the community to go out and get vaccinated. And this will be the segue into another topic about covid is. You know, the numbers are going up. As of I believe it was Saturday, the positive rate was three percent. The positive rate hadn't been three percent in months. So some things going on. At the news conference on Thursday, what about? What would that be? In the Eighth Mendoza said that it's a it's a sign of the variance. He thinks that this is the variance. Are here in the community and that's what's causing the rate to go up. It is really up among young people. Yeah, the other day, I think in the in I think it was in the thirty year old age group, there were sixty cases among thirty year olds, both male and female. Teens, up among teens. And so now that we're starting to get younger people vaccinated, will those numbers go down? Because the men dozes said that among older people who have been vaccinated for a while, the numbers have have gone...

...down. They've stabilized and gone down. And now that vacts vaccines are available to the younger groups, will they respond, get vaccinated and have have their numbers level off? Right? I want to die deeper into that because I have some opinions in regards today. Obviously opinions are are kind of fact base, but that always so we'll discuss some of the the opinions about that. But you're right. I also notice, I look at the numbers, and you're right, that the numbers and teens and younger adults that's where the numbers are rising at the most. So looks like let's look something. Something's going on there and I want to discuss that and just get to get your thoughts on that, but let's take a break first and we'll jump back into this topic. In regards to the vaccine, the increase, I'm sorry, factine, the increase of covid cases within the younger population, I want to kind of dive into that a little bit, but first let's going to take this break. This is inside the margins. Will come back to inside the margin's okay, Patty, let's go ahead and get right back into it. So before the break we were talking about the rise in covocations. Where at the three percent Markdell, and you're right, we haven't been there in months. So it's it was kind of it was kind of strange to see the numbers go back that way, especially as the weather's getting better and people are going outside more. So it's still it's kind of weird that that's happening. But you pointed out accurately that the numbers are rising within the younger population. Twenty thirty year olds, four year olds to are in that category, and teens, children and teens are also seeing a rise, and the older population not so much. So a couple questions I want to ask you. The first one is, and you kind of already hit the toward that. Is that because of the vaccines? Is it because the older population had access to the vaccines first, so they have been vaccinated, so they're not seeing their numbers increase more. The younger population is now. Are Now just getting access to the vaccine. And the second question is kind of a two part question. There's a lot of people, if you talk to the to the younger population, there's an attitude of Hey, because I'm younger, I'm healthier, so I'm not as afraid. If I get it, I'll be able to you know, I'll probably just lose my my smell and I'll come right back. I'm not one of those people who have issues or any already. You know that history of issues or complications. And also, because I'm young, I should be able to balance back faster. So I'm not really in a rush to get vaccinated at also, I'm not worried about following the quote unquote, safety precautions to not get sick. What are your thoughts on that? I think your thoughts should be there. You you tell us, man, the one, you, the one who's recovered, right, I mean, Yep, and I don't want to oute you as far as age, but I don't think you've gotten I don't think you've started getting mail from a ARP yet. Right, not yet. Well, okay, you was the under fifty group. Yes, when you get to be forty, forty nine, you start getting the mail from AARP. So you haven't gotten any of that yet. So that'll give you a hint of what how old Matt Is. I appreciate. That's the age group. That's it's okay. So what's interesting about this is that as of on April six for females and males in their forty was fewer than ten cases each. Then it went up into the S. Yeah, now it's in the high teens. So it's still in the high teens among s females and males in their S. again, it went on the sixth. That went from in the in the teens to in the s. Now it's in the S, females in the S and males in the S. and mean we got forty two and two days over the weekend. Again, these are the days the tests the return Asolute days that report. It's the type that support. Okay, there's a days are reported. So on the ninth and ten the county reported among twenty year olds, forty two...

...cases reported among females and thirty one and then thirty two cases report among males. So we've got in in two days we've got eighty and sixty. How about a boatloader? Right, I can't do the math. Your fin a hundred and forty cases in that age group in two days. We had days for all the age groups. We didn't have a hundred forty rights. Exactly. Correct there. You're right. So you know, does it go to what you're saying? They feel healthy. They're not going to get vaccine. Now that that's they're eligible for vaccine. They we don't know. And we're going to have to wait a month to see when, because you get, you get, depending on which shot you get. You waither waiting three weeks or four weeks, and then you got two weeks after that for full immunity. So is this going to go on for six more weeks? Yeah, yeah, like is just like fuck's and Tawny Phil R. Six more weeks of Groundhog Day and then, you know, see your shadow and till spring shows up. I mean we may have to wait really six weeks or two months to see. I hope not, because it a three percent positive rate. You know, I worry about not lockdown, but I worry about restrictions. Come, yeah, coming back. Yeah, because that was the number where we were that started res in the first place. Here's the funny thing, Patty, so, I recently went to the park on the I believe it was on Saturday. It's a very nice day. Took my kids to the park well, with my wife as well, and here's just talk this topics. You think about this. Here's what I saw. So parents who were not even parents, just people who are there, who are older, who you obviously older. Any time they were they got near like a crowd in the park, they massed up, they did all the things that they were supposed to do right. When they got a little further away, they would take the mask off and keep to themselves. The same as my family. We get the same thing the young like the young parents, you get the ones that, like s and s, they never put a mask on with they they had their kids with that marap. They got their grouped up or not, they just did not put it on. It's I think it's a thought process that I've heard and again I can't verify. This is how everyone's thinking, but I'm just saying this is a thought process. That I've heard is that the older population, the people who were most at risk, have already been vaccinated. So they're not really afraid of getting them sick now and they're not afraid of getting themselves sick because the people who are most at risk for the most part of now taken care of. Okay, so let me make sure I'm understanding is so you saying that younger people who aren't asking are not asking because they say, okay, older people already taking care of that's that was up. I've heard this actually said by a few people. I want to out their names, but they said, hey, so most, most of the older people that I know, and this is not this is almost verbatim from a person that I'm not going to say the sort of person is what most of the older people that I know have already been vaccinated. So I don't think that the threat is as bad anymore and I'm not afraid of getting it, so I'm not going to be as cautious as I was in the past. So I guess the good part of that is that people were concerned for others. That is, yes, that's the that is okay. So they were conser, but they're not as concerned for themselves. I mean I find that. I find that perplexing because you know, you don't know really what the long term effects of this are. You never hit you either, right and so, but you don't know. I mean I would think if you've got a kid, you don't want that kid to potentially be exposed. And then do we know if there's a lifetime of problem? Right, covid right, or six months or or whatever? Yeah, it's...

...a weird it's a weird it's funny because I I talked to like my talk to my parents and I've talked to some other people and they're they're had. My parents are fully vaccinated and they're happy and they're looking forward to having us all, because we haven't really been over there that much because of covid now they're like yeah, we want you now. You were allowing you to come over, you know, because we feel a little bit more safe, and I'm happy about that. But it just seems the younger the younger population did not share the same concerns as the people who were able to get vaccinated first. They're like, okay, we're worried about, like our parents and people are old and now that they're safe, figure everything's cool. Now if I get it up, I'm healthy, I'm fine, I'll fight through it and and and whatever. And I've heard this from multiple people, which makes me which is concerning to me. You know, I really don't and hum, I mean if I remember to ask that on Thursday at the at the news conference, you know, tell me a text them. Absolutely well, yeah, ask that question at the at the news conference that you know they don't. They don't care about themselves, but they cared about other people. That, I mean, I just find that. I just find that interesting. Yeah, I do too. I do too. It bottled my mind, but you but you see, and you're right, when you see the they I think, when you go like college age, I like, if you look at what was happening, and like Miami during spring break, I don't think there were any cares there whatsoever. They just want to have a good time. But it but it seems like people who were like young with families, they were kind of concern about their their elders in the family. They want to make sure that they were okay. And the younger groups that they were around. They weren't as concerned with that as much. They weren't really he if I get it, I'll be down for a few days, but I think I'll be able to be the beat it and I'm fine. Again. This is just only from a few people that I've heard. I don't know if this would this is a general thought process, you know, but I'm just saying I've talked to some people who've said this. I know one of the things that I'm I've been watching is the hospitalization rate and people who were on in the ICEEU and on ventilators, and it's being reported now for the for the county, but they've stopped reporting, at least I haven't seen it on what they could call this dashboard, the percent of available with the seven day average percent the seven day rolling percentage of available. Yeah, I remember that and I don't. I haven't seen that on the dashboard in a while and I'm wondering. I you know, we're limited to one question, to one follow up and the news conferences and so it is hard, it's hot. You got to spend wisely. You know what you want to do. So you know, I'm I'm interested in that because we've got about twenty percent, between twenty twenty five percent of people who were hospitalized in the in the region, Yep, think lakes region, are in the ICU or on ventilators. That strikes me like one and four, one in five. Yeah, we may have enough beds and we may have enough ventilators. That may not be the issue, but one and four or one in five still is really messed up. Like, yeah, I'm with you. I might under stet with you on that. Yeah, that's that. Now, concervative vaccine, no matter which one you get, prevents hospitalization, prevents serious so that would lead you to think, okay, our younger people, the ones in the hospital. We don't have that, that data yet. We don't. We don't know that. Yeah, so, but in if that's the case and younger people are being hospitalized seriously, how does that bode for recovery? Yeah, right, well, listen, you mentioned it earlier and I will say it again. I'm pretty much recovered fully from from it now. I still have things are just a little weird, I guess, but I feel much, much, much better. I don't recommend anyone getting it. I...

...think if you have the option to not get covid I said I sincerely think you should not, and also I am next time we do this show, I will be vaccinated, I will have the I'll be I'm already scheduled to take the Johnson and Johnson maccine, so I will be vaccinated as well. So I'm still even though I have the antibodies and all that stuff that you hear that probably protects me for that decent period of time, I'm still going to get vaccinated because I just want to make sure. Number two things. Number One, I talked about how important is to go to get, to get vaccinated. So I can't not do it. I can't tell everyone to do it not do it. And number two, I I think it's if I look at the science, I think it's safe and I think it's your best shot to avoid getting it and and seeing your world return to some sort of normalcy. And if that's what you want and if you want to have things open back up, to see your families, to go to go to games, events, festivals, if you want that stuff to happen again, we gotta get that. What's the what's the phrase heard of beautity? Right, we have to get there. And if you're not taking the vaccine. We're not going to get there unless everyone gets it. What you don't want to do either. So let me ask you. So men dozes said the other day for People Johnson and Johnson the advantage. It's one shot. Wanted do something, but he said don't wait for it because it's scarce and apparently we're getting less of it than we thought we were going to be getting. Mendozes big point was to get vaccinated now from Memorial Day. If you get vaccinated now, with whichever Moderna or the fiser, you be protected by Memorial Day. That sure, you know seven ish or so right away. How are you getting Johnson and Johnson's? I'm under the impression that is being kind of reserved for people for whom a second dose would be difficult. Sure could just agree to get them get the mayor or whatever it was. I would say it was luck, and I'll explain this to you. So if you heard the news, Wakeman's opened up vaccination and their stores. So wakement you you are able to get vaccine. So I believe it was last Thursday, I believe, as when they opened it up to the general public to schedule Baxination appointment. Now at Wakeman's they had the Johnson and Johnson and I cannot remember if it was the fiser of the Madurner, but it was one of those. So they had they had the Johnson Johnson and had had one of the other ones and you had a fifty shot of getting whatever one that they had available. So while I was at work, my wife signed me up to get one and I got. I got hooked up with the Johnson and Johnson. It wasn't because I have put a preference down or I asked for it that that's the one that I got. So I so with a sort of randomly yes, assigning people right, almost like a study in a sense. Right, it's not a study, but you were. It was the luck of the draw look the SIGNI's exactly correct. Luck of the drunk, that would be exactly correct. So yeah, I didn't. I didn't, ever, preference because and because of the fact that I again, I do have antibodies. So if I had to do the two shot deal, I wasn't going to say no because I'm I'm I have a pretty decent amount of protection right now because of the added bodies. So I didn't really matter to me. But I just happen to get the Johnson and Johnson. That was the one that I was lucky, luck of a draw, to get. What she get, she got. But the Maderna, she yep. So, yeah, see what, you know, what a good wife to sacrifice the one shot to her husband and she has to go twice. Yeah, yeah, that that's just how that's just how it turned out. So but again, I think, and this is just my opinion, everyone has their own opinions on the vaccines. If I recall, the Maderna and the fiser both have a ninety five percent. What do you call it? A rate of protection? And the Johnson and Johnson, you know, except for severe,...

...severe issues with the that we know with covid they're all good for but for like the regular, milder conditions of Covid I believe it's like like seventy five or something like that. I can't remember. You know, when you get into statistics, and and I think is a nation, we're kind of as a nation generals at generalizing sort of mathematic right. Even look at even the experts have a hard time explaining in plane language what that ninety five percent right, yeah, that's good point. So this was what they say is for to severe disease, they all were all right, they all work. They all work the same. For the for milder symptoms, there's there's a range. But you know what it really in the real world it may not matter. YEA, that difference may really just be statistical. Yep, in a sense, and so for you as an individual, it may not matter. The point is, get the vaccine, but debts at the very day. That's what we're saying, right, let's move this thing forward and protect yourself. I think that that's we're going to go to break on that one, because that's exactly we're trying to say. It doesn't matter which we you get. Get the vaccine. I don't care if it's Johnson, Johnson fiser or the Maderna. If you get a chance to get vaccinated, to get vaccine to protect yourself, protective people around you, and again, get give yourself the opportunity open things back up so we can kind of return back to what we remember a few years back as what normal was. Right. There's what we want. So, but you're right, patty, doesn't matter. Get the vaccine. All right, when we come back free the people rock, Patty. They are suing the city. There's suing the the bear that's here in the police. Let's find out what that's all about. We'll talk about that. Were returned. This is inside the mark. Welcome back to inside the margins. Okay, so real quick, I wanted to bring this up. So free the people rock has sued Rochester, in particular the mayor, the current chief of police, the former chief of police for police brutality and racism and other charges stemming from involvement, I guess, with the police not being fair towards people of Color. So this one's difficult for me and I will explain why. So, as we discussed last week, we have had an uptick in violence here in Rochester. Violent crimes are homicides are up. There's another car chase that just happened which left some people dad. So because of the this, we are calling for more police involvement. At the same time we're trying to do things to lessen police involvement. And it's a hard one because I understand both sides. Right it's easy to understand why there is an issue with police right now. Look at the news that we're looking at this morning or that this afternoon. We're looking at another twenty year old shot in Minneapolis, right as the Derek Chobin trial is still happening, which Darren Chabins is accused of murdering George Floyd. So another twenty year old shot, Black Man, shot in Minneapolis. We saw some information in regards to an army officer, a black army officer, pepper sprayed by police because they, quote unquote, said they didn't they pull them over because he didn't have any license plates, when in the police video on the body Candida, you can see the plate, actually the temporary plates, on his car in the back. So also with Dan, you prude, obviously that happened here.

There have been some issues with police and people are understandably upset with police and absolutely reform is needed, training is needed, disciplinary action is needed towards those who are committing these acts that are not correct or our mistreating people of Color or mistreating anybody, people with mental illnesses or anything like that. It's that's there is a certain way you should approach situations and obviously these police officers are doing it wrong and I discussed before to I've had some interactions, interactions with police where they were treating me unfairly. So this is an issue and it does need to be rectified. However, crime is also an issue right violent crime is on the rise, and I'm not sure if covid has had anything to do with that or just people don't know how to resolve disputes, but violent interactions are on the rise, homicides are on the rise, violent crime is on the rise and there's a call to stop the violence and there's a call for more police patrolling and the high crime areas, but we're also calling for less police at the same time. So to me, it's certainly a weird situation and it's a difficult one and obviously it's hard to have an answer as to what we do. But I will say this, and I say this I mean this, I mean this, I mean this whole hardly. We do need policing. It's something that's necessary because there are people out there who just need help. There are people out there who, you know they're starving, like the person who's homeless who robs a loaf of bread right, that person is doing it because he's hungry up, because he's a criminal. So we do the way you approach someone like that versus a person who was an actual career criminal is not having a mental illness issue or anything this. They just chose a life of crime and that's what they do. You need. You need police for that, because there's no moderator that's going to work this out with actual criminals. However, we do need drastic reform with the police. We need the police retooled and retrained on how to approach people. We should not come in guns blazing, hot on minor traffic offenses or minor traffic stops. You shouldn't come out with your guns drawn because you think someone's license plate expired or they were speeding or their tailight was out. These are no reasons why you should come out with guns blazing and screaming at people like they are hardened criminals. At the same time, though, we need police interaction with those violent crimes. The pick team, the five team, all the teams that we have developed in order to assist people who are going through mental episodes or on crisis. They're not going to help with the hardened criminal criminals, people who are intentionally committing crime. That because they are disturbed by any means. That is just what they do. They are criminals and they steal and they hurt and they do whatever. There are those people that are out there, unfortunately, and you can't change those. But again, there are also a lot of people out there who are just going through some tough times, who have lived in lifestyles of poverty, who are trying to put food on the table or are just your average everythy citizen who accidentally broke a rule, like didn't stop completely at a stop sign or a has a traffic light out up, sorry, I tell light out, or the registration is...

...not right or their inspecial stick sticker and expired. That's like everybody has those kind of issues. Right. Those are criminals, there's those just people who made a mistake and we don't need aggressive policing for those instances. So I guess that's where I lie. I think there is I don't know if you want to again the suit may be necessary in order to look at how police treatment when it comes to African Americans and other people of color or people with mental issues has happened in the past. Maybe the suit will look into that and see if that, if that's an accurate thing to do. But I just want to make sure everyone understands that we cannot completely eradicate policing. That will not bode well for us. We need to read tool policing, we need to re educate policing, we need to probably try to have more people of Color on the force, people who live in the city, who have gone through city struggles on the force, people who have a little empathy know how to actually handle these situations on the force. But if we get rid of policing, I think that's not going to turn out well for us well. And the other thing too, is I think of okay, if I am and then I hope to hope nobody else ever is. You know, if I'm in a victim of carjacking, I think I may want somebody to help me with my mental health afterwards. Don't just go over to the perpetrator right right, come to the come to the person who mean to use the word victim it, but come to the person who has been the climb, has been committed against, Yep, and offered to I don't know, and this may be I get the sense that the pick team is only for the perpetrator. I could be wrong about that and this is really the first time I thought about that. Who is who is helping the person who's the aggrieved party right right here, I mean, if I'm if I'm the aggrieved party in a carjacking, I don't know that I want the pick person going to the person who tried to run me off the road, steal my car and kill me. Yeah, that's what's me. I didn't do something's right. That's that makes that makes almost no sense to try to, you know, figure out what the problems the guy who just robbed you while you're sitting there, sit there bruising, beaten, with your vehicle stolen, you like, like you're just sitting there by yourself with the person who jacked he was being are you okay? Yeah, you're right. It's a weird why did it? Why did you? I mean, and that that is, I think, somewhere down the road, perhaps that's part of rehabilitation in a sense, if you want to use that word. But immediately that person's a criminal, right, right, do out with them in that way. Yeah, and then if we want the restorative justice to do with that down the road perhaps, but what is the immediacy in front of you now? If someone is distraught, there's a your potential. There's, you may, suicide ideation and they don't want to see a police officer. Yes, and the person there, but have the police officer nearby because you don't know when a weapon may appear and something like that. But if there's violent crime, I I think you need to take care of the person for whom that crime is being committed against first. Ye, right, worried about their mental health, right, their stability. Make sure that the very cur safety for your right. Then we'll worry about the perpetrator, because the perpetrator made a choice. The aggrieved party didn't make that choice. Right, and I want to make sure that I'm clear on this. To every situation is different. Right. So, let's say a homeless guy who wasn't eaten for weeks went to the local crocer store and stild some bread. You know, you might not want to have guns blazing on that guy exactly. Don't you know what I mean? That?...

That's this is more of an okay, listen, not saying that stealing is right, but I understand why you did it. You know, you're starting right. There's a there's a so there's a deeper issue. there. Issue wasn't that you're a crook. The issue is that you're trying to feed yourself because you are starving. So that's different. Then, if then, if someone is we have arguments and people are like, you know, people were shooting people in arguments, and I think we need to in situations like that, we need to take care of the of the the party that has been on the receiving end of this. Yeah, the guy's been shot. Probably should be yes, and then let's and then let's work our way. Let's work our way that. You're right, use it. It's situational, but let's not lose sight of right. And I think that's the whole point of this conversation, Patty, is that we have we can't. It's not. It's not an all or nothing thing. It never has been, in my opinion. It's every situation is different. Every single situation is different, and it's like we explain, there some guy who carjacts you. Your approach may be different on someone's fleeing after cargooking for people. Then the guy with no shoes on his feet who does rob the store for some bread. Right, that's you. Actually, you should definitely have two different approaches on those people. You should not come out chasing down the guy for, you know, for a dollar twenty five the loaf of bread, you know, who's trying to feed himself. But the guy who's like, you know, hurt five people while stealing cars. You may want to be a little more wrestle with that guy. Right. Yeah, and and I think our public has to understand that. Right at see public service holes with bussitly me and Patty. I've done patty. We are running out a time. Thanks again. I always appreciate you on this show. Hey, don't forget. You heard the headlines earlier in the show. If you want to get the full versions of those headlines, go to the my new reporter on that again. That's that's minority reporter totten net. Go there. You get the full version of those headlines. You also have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter. You get the digital or the hard copy, whichever one is your preference. Again, as I say always, I subscribe. I think it's important to get the information and the stories that are important to you and your community. So definitely take advantage of that that option. And also, if you're just tuting in right now, you have missed inside the margins. Shame on you, but that's okay. You can go to inside the margins RADIOCOM and listen to this in all past episodes of inside the margins, and you can also go anywhere you get your podcast. I heartcom. Wherever you want to go, inside the margins is available. All right, Patty, I believe you are off next week. It's true. Yeah, so I will miss you dearly, but but we hope, I hope other people will do you always bring great information to a sound. You will be missed, but we will. We will be back next week and then when you return, will do it again on that Monday. I was that sound. That sounds like a deal, all right. Sounds Great. All right for patty singer. I am Matt Wilson. This isn't inside the margins. Will see you next week. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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