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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 5 · 2 years ago

The College Dilemma

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Should you go to college right after you finish high school? Is college right for everyone? We interview Jim Salmon, Certified Home Inspector and Radio host (WHAM 1180), Dom Genova, Car Dealership Owner and Radio Host (WHAM 1180), and Dr. Kim Young, College Professor and Journalist to get their thoughts

The tune station one good point nine extreme Yo. What up, everybody, it's Mike and rich from the music matrix. Be Sure to listen to us as we discuss music's most important topics and help US support local artists and musicians in the area. Be sure to tune in every Tuesday morning at Zen on one hundred point nine F'm wxir, or online at one hundred nine wxircom if music matters to you, you'll be tuned into the music matrix. Hey, folks, it's Jason Taylor here, host of evidence of design. Please tune into our show on Saturdays from eleven am to twelve PM, where we dig into political economic analysis of issues affecting us right here and right now. Come think with us on a hundred point nine F M W X ir. Only in Rochester, New York, marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. That's right, we are back and thank you for joining us for this edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson, and Yeah, it feels that we've been gone for a while, because we have been, but it's good to be back doing what we do best here now, if this is your first time joining us for inside the margins, what we do here is we cover topics that a lot of other shows don't cover, especially for groups that are considered marginalized. Now, when I say marginalized, I'm not talking about any specific group. There's a lot of different groups out there that that can be considered marginalized. We're talking racially, or sexually or gender or even income levels or socially, you know, poor versus rich. A lot of divides out there where people kind of feel targeted or left out from general public conversation. So today we're going to deal with a topic that's near in dear to my heart, and it's about college. Now, the reason why I think this is an important topics because I am in college now, myself, bleed or not yet. I'm an Ottle Dude in college, but this is my second stint at college. I have already graduate with my bachelor's degree and I am now in college for my masters, and this is not me taking a chance to gloat or brag about me being in Collis, because trust me, and it's expensive. There's not much to brack about. But I did go to college right after high school and it was not a successful that was my first time ever being away for my family, you know, doing it on my own, and I was not used to that. I wasn't ready for that. I didn't really even know what I wanted to do. I chose a major because I thought it was something that I wanted to do and I did not do well and I ended up dropping out and it took me good twenty years later for me to try to do it again. So so the question that we're going to attack is is it good for people to be pushed into college right after high school? Now, I don't know if you've noticed, but there is a debt problem with college right down. People are extremely in the whole when it comes to what they owe for college. We're talking people. The average that I looked at it's thirtyzero. So the average person owes thirtyzero dollars after they come out of college. Now, so the question that is asked is is college for everybody? Number one, so should everyone be pushed into college? And number two, should you do it right after high school? You know, should you take some time to maybe figure yourself out? You know, and it's again, it's there's a stigma out there where people who have gone to college versus people who have not gone to college. And you know, some of the people who have not gone to college sometimes don't feel like they are even on even playing fields with people who have gone to college. Or there's there's even like a a social divide there, right, if you go out with people, people who are educated or who have been in involved with higher education seemed to kind of flock together, and people who are not also seemed to flock together. It's weird that way, but it's true and I've noticed that even with me, when I did not graduate college, I still kind of went with the perception that I did. I kind of just went with hey, yeah, I went to college. So I just kind of pretended...

...that I finished college because that's how I felt. I felt like if I did not keep that front that I went to college out there, you know, right, you know, and I graduated, that I would be looked at differently and I don't know why I felt that way, but I did. So I for years. I had that front for I mean I think I did go to college right I didn't finish, but all of my friends and even places that I worked at all believed that I finished college and I did not, and it was in you know, it's embarrassing to even mention that. Like why would the jobs that I had after high school didn't even require me to be in college. I did not need a college degree to get the jobs that I got, so there was no reason for me to even pretend to be in college. You everyone who worked with me, who were at the jobs that I were at, most of them did not have a college degree and it was not required. But I just felt I don't know. My family, every one of my family, on my brothers, especially my parents, different story. You know, they found success without needing for your degrees. But my brothers both went to college right after high school and both graduated with degrees. My brother, my older brother, became a CPA and my younger brother got a degree in like graphic arts, and you know, they're both doing very well. So I think just I don't know, in my family I felt like I was the outcast, so I felt it was necessary to not be honest about how what I did in college. But you know, now I am agree a college graduate, I have an associate's degree, I have a bachelor's degree and I will soon have a master's degree, and I feel like that was stupid. I think that's funny that, now that I actually have degrees, that I feel like what I did back then was idiotic. I did not need to do that, but that's that's how it is. People have that perception, people think look at you differently when you don't have when you're put into a your categorized, and that's how I feel. So I wanted to get opinions out there. I used, you know, we did a little research and we also interview people. So we interviewed people who did go to college and have found success. We've interview people who did not go to college and also found success, and then we interview people who I kind of in between. They went to college, got a degree, but they destinarily don't think that that was why that they're successful, you know. So that's what we wanted, what we want to tackle today. We want to talk about the stigma in College, in the college dilemma and the fact that a lot of people who do go to college and once they graduate, wait, once they graduate college, they end up right back at home with their parents. Is that funny? You spend all this money to get an education that supposedly going to help you out and get you this high paying job. Went in reality you end up right that get your parents house, looking for a job. Well, at the same time there are people out there who never went to college, who have been on their own forever and make good livings. So it's just funny how that is and we just want to kind of see why that is and we are going to look deeper into that. First, let's go ahead and keep you up to date with some current news. This is AP news and will be right back. I'm Timid Bar Our Jersey City, New Jersey, Mayor Stephen Full up say as an armed couple pulled up slowly in front of a Jewish market yesterday and deliberately opened fire on the people inside. From our standpoint, there is no question that this is a hate crime and anti Semitism should be called out aggressively and firmly immediately for what it is. The attack which evolved in a lengthy gun battle resulted in the deaths of the man and the woman and three people in the market. Before that standoff, the to killed a police officer. They are also suspects in the death of an uber driver over the weekend. Investigators say that to identify themselves in the past as black Hebrew Israelites, a movement whose members have been known to rail against whites and Jews. President trump denounced the attack and anti Semitism at a Hanneka reception at the White House. With one voice, we vowed to crush the monstrous evil of anti Semitism whenever and wherever it appears, and we're working very hard on that and I can tell you that that we have a lot of people in government working very, very hard on that. Federal Reserve Board Chairman Jerome Pole says key interest rates will remain where they are are. Economic Outlook remains a favorable one, despite global developments and ongoing risks. With our decisions through the course of the past year, we believe that monetary policy is well positioned to serve the American people. Powell signaled the Fed expects to keep low rach unchanged through next...

...year. The Pentagon is considering several options to reduce the number of troops in Afghanistan. Are Commanders I've spoken to with them, General Millie has feel that we could reduce our force presence there and still be able to conduct that mission. I'm interested in reducing our force presence. Defense Secretary Mark Esper says one option is to shift to a narrow, narrower counter terrorism mission. This is AP news. All right, and we're back and thanks for staying with us here on inside the margin. So, as I stated earlier, I looked into this college dilemma and I interviewed some people and got their perspectives on this and we're going to go ahead and play what we found by asking these people their thoughts and then after that will reflect them that and see what we took from everyone's opinions as far as their thoughts on going to college right after high school. But first let's go ahead and play some music for you. will go ahead and let you run wine and listen to some great music, and then will we come back? We will play in college dilemma and after that we will talk about it. This is inside the margins. Will be right back. If tomorrow is judgment and I'm standing on the front and the Lord Ast me what I did with my life. H I will stay. I spent a year. If I wake up and we see destruction and and I feel you can't, it's okay if you're coming with me, if I lose my fame and I'm sleeping and it's okay. If you're sleeping as we staying, and no matter, it's okay. And if I should die very don't cry, cause on earth and no manner, what the people say. I've been waiting for. You have the Judgment Day you're listening to inside the margins...

...on one hundred nine Xir, extreme independent radio and Rochester's Urban Alternative Music Station. I don't want to do that. I know, baby, baby, is what you give me. Someone I don't never love. I love my life. Was All I didn't wanna face. We see another day sudden away. Maybe you try, you could. Maybe it's because I wasn't you give me some thought. Because of you. This is one hundred point nine FM, extreme independent radio, your urban alternative. Well, back to inside the margins. So, as I discussed earlier, we're going to take a look...

...until this college dilemma and to see if going to college right after high school is actually a great idea. So here is the piece that we put together with some interviews. It's called the college dilemma. Research completed in two thousand and seventeen by the American Sociological Association shows that from one nineteen sixty seven to two thousand and twelve, the percentage of eighteen to twenty four year olds enrolled in college increased nearly sixty one percent. In one thousand nine hundred and sixty seven, twenty five and a half percent of eighteen to twenty four year olds were enrolled in college. By the year two thousand and twelve, that number increased to forty one percent. As enrollment increased, the cost of higher education increased as well, while student AIDS stagnated. This cost students and their families to take on historic levels of debt to fund college going. Student debt has doubled in the past decade topping one trillion in the aggregate, with the average college graduate debt or owing thirtyzero dollars. Rising debt levels have fuel scholarly and public concern about the potential impact of student debt on the well being of young adults. Many scholars have expressed concern that rising student debt is contributing to the boomerang generation of young adults returning home. Simply put, students have too much debt and do not earn enough after leaving college to live on their own. This epidemic may also be the cause of the increased vacancies of jobs in the trade field. According to a recent article from MP are, high school graduates have been so effectively encouraged to get a bachelor's degree that high paid jobs requiring shorter and less expensive training are going unfulfilled. This affects those students and also poses a real threat to the economy. So, if college is so expensive and is the cause of so much debt and struggle among young adults, why does college enrollment continue to increase? Our high school age kids being pushed into college without a chance to explore other career paths that do not require a college degree? Jim Salmon is a home inspector and a radio host. He found success without going to college after school. Simon believes at college isn't necessarily for everyone. I think it's always been my contention, and I can apply it to myself, that not everybody should go to college. I couldn't wait to get out of school and then I went back and tried a couple of semesters of college and I just didn't like it. I was more of a handson type of person and there are people that that are more hands on, that could learn a craft on art, you know, to be able to study plumbing, electrical, hands on types of things that you don't learn in college, and you can make just as good at living, or more than if you went for four years and then had all this college debt. Fellow radio broadcaster and car dealership owner, Dom Jetto, though, holds a master's degree in marketing. He believes college can be beneficial as long as there is a skill being learned that can be used in the workforce. Well, the whole thing about education, education, there's two ways of looking education. Education supposed to teach US something you don't know, which is all well and good, but you need education that teaches you how to make a living also. So, I mean, let's put it this way. You can get a education and education in Russian history, and that's all well and good and you're going to have a college degree, but does very little job opportunity for somebody who has a degree in Russian history. Now you're going to have big college debt. You're going to have a very specific job that's open to you, but it's going to be very narrow where you could well, you can get a job as a car mechanic, a technician we call him these days. You have very little dead, if any, debt at all. You're making sixty, eightyzero dollars a year. You have a great life for yourself. You don't know a lot about Russian history, but you can actually make a life for yourself. When asked why college debt continues to rise while so many trade jobs sit empty, Simmon believes that high schools as well as parents may be at fault. This trillion dollar that we have in our nation from college student loans was caused directly by eliminating shop class from high school home economics. That's another whole discussion. Shop Class, metal shop, would shop all of that stuff, but taught people that really had hands on skills when they were younger that hey, you know, I can be a carpenter, I can build stuff. But then all of a sudden your parents say no, no, you have to go to college, so you go to college and you know,...

...you come out to the other end with all his dad and it's just it's unnecessary. We need to get back to the basics. We need people to build things and you can make just as much money as a plumber, electrician, Mason, you know as you can is a starting engineer, something like that. A lot of us the fault of the parents, maybe not completely their fault, because they've been condition that if their kid doesn't go to college they're not going to be successful, which is not true. And you go there and you you go through college, which is for most people's a fairly good experience. You learned something, but when you first go in you have no idea what you really want to do and some people change it up and whatever. Next thing you know, you come out of there and you know forty, fifty, s hundred thousand dollars and you can't get a job anywhere near what you were trained for in or what you thought you were going to get based on what you studied in college. General beliefs college can be beneficial as longest students come up with a marketable skill set and have a backup plan for success. My daughter graduated with a degree in English. Now, a degree in English is really not marketable in and up itself. There's very few people want to go out and have a interview for somebody to diagram sentences or know the works of Shakespeare whatever. But what she did is she ended up going to law school and use the education as you got being an English major to get a law degree, which is a marketable skill because of the people that need lawyers, and she's working for the Department of Justice now in Washington DC. So that's the difference between getting an education and getting a skill set. You get education, but has to ultimately result in having a skill set that's marketable. Somebody's looking for a job. Now you can go to bosses or anyone of these trade schools and and get a degree in in the trades and do very, very well for yourself. A plumber, electrician, a welder, they're all jobs that are that are going wanting and we encourage people to have to go for the degreat. What's not the degree, it's having a marketable skill, and that's what I believe in, because there are a lot of people that I know working at the dealership for me now that have never gone to college but they're doing very, very well for themselves. I have this expression to not everybody would teach the piano to can make music. So we don't want to discourage you from trying to be a big league ball player, but you have to also understand that there are very few big league ball players. So you have to have your plan B. What what if your dream doesn't come true? What are you going to do? Because we keep we keep on telling our children you can do anything you want to do. You can't do anything you want to do. I mean, I told my daughter, I said you never going to be sure. It stop for the Yankees. You're you're too sure, you're the wrong sex, you don't have a big league arm and jeter is going to be there for a while. This is years ago. Yeah, but, but, but you can do what your talents are. So find out what your God given talents are and exploit those hows and also have a plan B. I mean, I did not. I wanted to be a vice president of a Chrysler. I end up being a card dealer and it's a long story, but I ended up better off than I would have been. Salmon also believes that's tough for guidance counselors to push high school students into trade jobs because a potential backlash from the parents. You know, it's a two edge sword because the parents don't want to believe that the counselor saying your kids not good enough to go to school, when actually it's not about that. It's about each individual and talking with him and whatever. I remember my guidance conseilor back in one thousand nine hundred and sixty something. He said what do you want to do with your life? And I said I want to be an astronaut and his reply to me was, Jim, astronauts don't get seas. You know, I don't know what to tell you. Well, he was right and you know, one of my radio partners here for a long time said to me, you know, I've never known anybody that made as much out of as little as you did. So you know, I'm you know, I'm glad that I was able to make a good living. I mean this community has been really good to me and I enjoy being a home inspector. But it's a pieces and parts and the two by fours and a basement foundation and all that other stuff. But you're not going to learn any of that in college. Dr Kim Young is a professor at the college at Brockport. Before becoming a professor, she worked as a reporter and journalists both in radio and television. Dr Young believes the college experience is so much more than just learning employment skills. Going to college is an opportunity to really embrace all kinds of different disciplines, to look at the liberal arts, to look at science, to look at mathematics, to look at Fine Arts, all of those kinds of things and expose yourselves to new ways of thinking about the world. And that's what higher education was always meant to be. It's a way to learn to think about things in new ways. Should all students go to college to find their path? Probably not, but I think at least opening the door to to college for people provides just a long term kind of a place in the world.

Dr Young says that people need to change that we think about college. You know, in thinking about my own children right there was never any question that they would be going to college and as there was none for me with my parents, it was just sort of an expectation. Having said that, that doesn't mean if any one of the three of my kids had decided that they they wanted to take some time and didn't want to go that I certainly would have supported that. But I think from an educator's perspective again, I think I think we're looking at college in the wrong way. I think what people are thinking is that there's this sort of magical gift that you're given keys to the kingdom, if you will, that once you transition from high school and you go to college, then the world will open up. And again, that's only up to you. And and what I caution people about is that college isn't this panacea for a job. That's not what a higher education was ever intended to be. Higher Education is a place where you learn a whole lot about a whole lot, and not just this technical school. So I think we have to be really careful about the way in which we view high your education. It is a place where you learn a many different things, least of which is about yourself right along the way. Young does believe that there's sometimes can be a stigma against people who work in the trades and that stigma can be overshadowed by success. Yeah, I mean I think you you know, even mediated image I was talking about this with somebody and there's the movie grease or the play a grease, and you know beauty school drop out, and so I think there is a sort of a segregated thought about that, you know, tracking students one way or another. But I mean, I do think that there is somewhat of a stigma with that. But but again, in the long run, does it serve that young person well to go off and learn a trade, then all the better, because somewhere down the line, you know, the people who stigmatized you because you went into trade school, you'll be charging them a whole lot of money to fix their toilet or fix their plumbing or you know. So the jokes on them. Genovas says, the only person that can make you feel an adequate is yourself. I think a lot of people do do that. But then that has to do with your own focus at control. That has to do with your sense of pride and your sense of of self esteem, and your self esteem is dependent upon you. Your self esteem has to beend nobody can make you feel as an Eller to Roosevelt statement, actually, nobody can make you feel inferior without your agreement. You have to accept that you have to feel that way. Now my mechanic is twenty two years old and go to college, got a house in a boat and and whatever. You know what, he doesn't need somebody else to validate this for himself. He's validating in here in his heart. He knows. And somebody can say anything that they want about you, but if if you take it to heart, you let it bother you, that's that's on you, that's not on them. After twelve years of consistent schooling, it is only natural to want to take a break from the luring process. Sendon says students should take time to think about their next days of life and not let themselves be pushing to college right after high school. I guess if money's no object, you know and you're not going to come out with the debt, you know there are some families that can just pay for it and have plan for it or whatever. Okay, fine, but if you're going to wind up coming out of there not knowing what you're going to do, really not enjoying it, other things than your mind, why do that? Push back a little bit on that. Be sure that you know. Go out and investigate some things. Take some time it's not right for everybody to just go to college right out of high school. Maybe you need a year to travel around the country or figure out who we are. So I think before you rush into that, you how to really sit down and think it up. By by eighteen or so, you should be able to formulate a little bit of your own future in your head. Dr Young believes that college offers doing as a chance to grow as a person in general. She says that students are exposed to people that they may have never encountered without college, and this promotes diversity. You know, many of the things that go on here at college are outside of the classroom. You know, many of our students come from places where people don't look anything but like them. So they're seeing the every day of their lives. They're exposed to people who think like them, look like them, dressed like them, and so when you come out of that environment you're exposed to all kinds of different people who come from all kinds of different places, and what happens is your mind opens to new possibilities and all of those perhaps stereotypes you've held of...

...people that don't look like you, sound like you've talked like you walk like you think like you maybe your mind then opens up to a rich experience of the world and it is life changing and it matters. That was the college dilemma. Will be back to reflect on what we learn from those interviews after a few songs. This is inside the margins. Will be right back. Hey, this is cassie hat tack, with girl from the kitchen table, talks Saturdays at five PM. You're listening to one hundred point nine of them. The X Ir, Rochester, New York, wing and mony again. When does a pain never and when do the two start running? When does you get over with big? I hear what you say much sweet that's not making sand. So we can I see? When can I see you again? When can I heart beat again? When can I see you? When cannot breathe once again, and we cannot. When does my some baby again? Where water again? And what if I still am n truly over what I was supposed to do? This you and I'm saying breaking send. So when can I see you? When can I see you again? When can my heart beat? When can I see you again? And when cannot breathe once again, and when can I see again? These fee is not making say so. Can I see you again? When can I again? Heart beat again. When can I see you again, and when cannot be what's again, and can see? Let's see you. Look. Do you have a topic that you would like to discust on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Anyway, even if you cannot stay, think it for me. There is I just wont by shown a Canon. Nigger. Don't you dumb baby. Love me now, don't you do every day?...

Who All sleep? Don't you know? You ever fish? But yeah, that's so undercover. Love it, Cham light a longs. Be Right or be only what you make me. Baby, don't woe away, don't be so shakey. Watch your mind. Don't want your money be sweep. Don't you know who sleep? Don't you know? Yet you are designed. Yeah, you're listening to inside the margins on one hundred nine r extreme independent radio and Rochester's Urban Alternative Music Station. All right, welcome back to inside the margins. So that was the college dilemma. And what did we learn here? So the opinions from the people that we interviewed kind of varied. I think everyone agreed that going to college right after school is not for everybody. In fact, going to college period is not for everybody. But there's three thought thought processes there, right. So one was, you know, college just might not be for you at all. It might be better for you to learn something technical or hands on or learn a trade to earn your income. And if you learn a trade, there is little to no debt when you do that and you come up with the skill that you can use for the rest of your life and you could make a very great living doing that. So that's the first thought process. The second thought process that we heard from our friend Dom Jenda. As he said, going to schools good, but if you focus on more than just education, you got to focus on a marketable skill and he gave the example of his daughter who went to school for English and that may not have been the, you know, most marketable skill that she learned because unless you're being an England unless you're going to going to become an English teacher, there's not really a lot of feels that require an English degree. But she used that to get into law school and of course being a lawyer is certainly marketable. Everyone eventually may need a lawyer and regardless, and we're not talking about lawyers like for divorcest off, but even if you buy a house or, you know, a car, if you get into a car accident or you know, anything like that, you're going to need or a lawyer or your will and like that. Lawyers are definitely...

...useful. So if you go to school, you become a lawyer, you're probably going to make a good living. And then there was the third thought process. That was from Professor Kimmy Young, and she said that college is important because it's we have to rethink the way that we think about college. College should not be thought about as this end I'll be all of making our earning income, that it's not a touch, it's not a you know, trade or a technical school, but rather the experience of college is what's what is important, because you learned a little bit about everything in college, right, or a whole lot, about a whole lot, is what she said. So and also it promotes diversity. So if you're a person who is just used to seeing a certain kind of people, like if you're a black person, if you and if you only hung up with black people, your entire life, you know from the from the inner city, or if you're a white person and you've only hung up with white people from the suburbs or maybe the country for your entire lives, when you get into college it is a way for you to intermingle with people from all races, creeds and colors so you can learn you know, or you're see people who don't just look like you and talk like you and have the same thoughts as you. You see people who look different and act different and have different thought processes throughout. So those were the three thoughts that we came out with after making this film out of this. It actually it is a film too, but we'll talk about that some other time. But we've obviously did the audio for this. So here is my thought. I think everybody is right. And you say, Matt, that's the easy way out, and it might be the easier way out, but that's actually what I believe. I think everyone in that piece is accurate. I don't think collegis is for everyone and I worked at a college also. I worked out a college out in Dansville and I won't say what the college is, but if you've been to Dansville you know that there's only a few options for a school out there. So you probably can figure out which college it is, but I'm not going to see it. But I worked at a college and I helped students out who were enrolling in at that college. There was a high number of people who were tenant that college who weren't your traditional student, and I want to say traditional student, we're talking about students who, you know, ages eighteen to about twenty five. That's your traditional college student right the younger age. There were a large population there of adult learners, people, you know, age thirty plus, who are going back to school to try to learn something. And I learned that that school that you know, everyone who was there, it wasn't necessarily everyone who who's there wanted to be there. They thought that that was this is what they had to do to make an income. Now, the older people who were there had already lived lives and have already figured out what they wanted to be and what they wanted to do. So now they're going to school because they need to get a degree in the field that they have decided that they want to work the rest of their days in. And those people ended up being successful a lot of times because they were very focused on what they wanted to do. Some of the the younger students had no focus, had no determination, didn't know what they wanted to do and some of them barely made it out of high school, you know. So they came to the college with, you know, a low GPA from high school and college is obviously is going to be much tougher than high school. So it's if you struggled in high school, chances are you're probably going to struggle in college also. So that's the thing. I think. When people think about struggling in high school or being told that college isn't for you, they automatically think you're saying you're too dumb for college, you're not smart enough for college, and that's not true. There are people who work and plumbing or in landscaping or in any of those trade feels, home inspectors all those, who are much smarter than I am and they know how to do things that I will never know how to do. So because because they were not built for college and didn't do well like a high school in college does not mean that they are not educated or smart people. Just means that that format of education or that method or being, you know, good with those different ways or methods and college we're not really meant for them. They had skills in other areas that they could use to their benefit. That skills that I don't have. So I would never call someone who is making a great living at something that I don't know how to do an idiot for not going to college, because I'm the idiot. I'm the one that's in debt and I'm still not getting...

...paid that much right now, to this day. So that's not true and I think that's the problem. Is People have that stigma. People feel like they have to go to college because they don't want to be called stupid or dumb or Oh, you're in I remember when I was in high school people would make fun people going to bowse these. Why would you make fun of someone going to bows's? They're getting a skill and they're going to be the one charging you money to fix your stuff because you don't know how to do it. But but that's it. I'm telling you. I'm sure it still is to that way today, that people in high school make fun of some of the kids who go to bows's instead of going to other the classes. So college is not for everybody. People who people don't, people don't want to continue that high school or education format, you know, for another four years or even more after getting high school number two. I also agree with what Dom Jenivis as so Jim Simmons said that, you know, you should take the sake some time and think about it, which I think Jim's right down. Jen of as said that if you're going to go to college and if you're focusing on going to college for primarily getting a degree so you can find a job. Now I would want to preface that. If you're if you're focusing on going to school to get a degree to get a job, then you have to make sure that you're getting a degree in a marketable area. You get skilled somewhere where it's going to be it's going to get you a job. You don't want to be a person who gets a job and you know degree in Japanese history, because that's great and all and you have a degree, but who's hiring people who have degrees in Japanese history? Probably not a lot of people in the states. So if you if your whole reasoning for going to college is just for you to get a degree to get a job. Make sure that you you can still dabble in the dream field, but have that plan B of Hey, I took this as a miner or I you know or whatever. So you know you have a skill that you that you can use to get you a job. And number three, I do think people who lived sheltered lives or not even sheltered lives, lies where they haven't interacted with a lot of people. They have. They're the kind of people that haven't ever left their neighborhood or their block. You know, going to to Gates is a big trip for them or going outside of the city at all. are going inside of the city is a big trip for them. If that is you in college, might be something that's good for you because it will expose you to a whole new world and you may need that. You you might not think that you have stereotypes or any racist thoughts whatsoever, but you may just because you have not been exposed to other people or other ways people think. Everyone that you've been around thinks the way you do, looks the way you do. So you automatically, if you're told that all of this type of people do this, you're going to believe that because everyone that you've encountered in your life that you consider close to you as told you that. So you need college, because college will expose you to a whole bunch of different people from different races and different sexes and different religions, and you will have come out probably a better person because now you have been exposed to a diverse world, and that's might take on that. Let me know your opinions on this. I would I love to hear from you. You can email us at inside margins at gmailcom. Again, that's inside margins at gmailcom. and not only can you email us about this show, but if you have any thoughts on any topics that you want to hear because they're important to you, we want to do our best to make sure that you are heard. Okay, well, that will do it for us for this week's episode of inside the margins. Thank you for joining us and it's good to be back and we will be back next week with the brand new topic. Thank you so much. This is Matt Wilson and will see you next week for inside the margins. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. You're listening to one hundred point nine w x ire LP in Rochester, New York, the home of extreme independent radio. Find US online at one hundred and nine W X IRCOM.

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