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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 14 · 2 years ago

RSCD Budget issues during the Covid-19 Crisis

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of Inside The Margins Patti Singer delivers the headline news and we discuss the budget issues the Rochester City School District currently faces. We will also play a clip of the Richard McCullough interview from The Roc City Showcase Podcast.

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Well, hello and welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, not Wilson. Well, covid nineteen continues to dominate the headlines and I don't think that's going to change anytime soon. We have to get used to that. And more news about not the greatest news. The numbers are increasing and people are still getting sick. We'll get into that and also some mental health stuff as well. I know we talked about that last week, but it's important for people to stay healthy, especially mentally, during this time that it's really easy to to set yourself out when you're kind of trapped with nowhere to go. But we'll get into all that stuff a little later on. First let's go ahead and get into our headlines of the day with the wonderful, fabulous patty singer from my nerve reporter. Well, Patty Oh my gosh, Mat oh my gosh, you are you boosting my mental health? I've tried to you. I'm tried to okay, thank you very much. So, as Matt said, we have numerous stories this week that are covid nineteen related. One of those is what is surge capacity and how our hospitals getting ready. Covid nineteen has changed how we live, how we talk about how we live. Terms like social distancing and flatten the curve are now in everybody's vocabulary. The latest phrase is surge capacity, that is, the ability of the health system to handle a large amount of cases in a relatively short period of time. On March twenty seven Monroe County officials and leadership from Rochester regional health and you are medicine explained a four phase plan to handle a massive influx of cases. In other covid nineteen news in the past week mayre lovely warring closed playgrounds, basketball tennis courts, athletic fields and outdoor recreation areas until further notice because of the virus. Monroe County announced a site for mandatory quarantine. County officials said they had several sites in mind should they be needed, and they chose, at least to begin with, the Forty Three Room Clarion Point Rochester Hotel on Monroe Avenue. In writing. As safe housing for people who cannot be in isolation in their own residents. School number seven becomes a site for grabbing go meals. The school will on Brian Street, joined other RCSD sites as well as recreation centers, to provide grab and go meals. Breakfast and lunch are at the school district sites and breakfast, lunch and dinner are at the art center sites. If you have questions about those sites, you can contact three one, one, two. Communities of color. For people who work outside of homes, the recommendation is to wash up and change clothes before reuniting with your families and national news communities of Color and immigrants who tend to live in multigenerational households, it's imperative for them that those individuals who must leave the household for work wash up and change clothes afterward before they engage with their families. The virus can be in the air for up to three hours and it can live on different types of surfaces for different periods of time. So far, what people know is the longest is about seventy two hours on a hard surface like plastic or steel. Masks are now required for hospital...

...staff at you are medicine and at Rochester regional as of seven o'clock on March thirty one, both the healthcare systems required that all healthcare providers, staff and visitors where surgical masks in the hospitals to reduce the risk of spreading the virus. Staff at the system owned out patient clinics also will wear masks, and the systems were in discussions about what to do with some of their looser affiliates, such as Jordan Hell Center, which has several sites in Rochester. As of this writing, they were staff. There was not mandatory masking, but that could change by the time you have your visit. In our opinion pages, Michael Vaughan is saying now what? Why not start talking about what happens after Covid nineteen? He wants to begin that discussion now. He says that we know the information about the virus, but we need to start to look ahead. As we spend time talking about recovering, we provide folks with hope and optimism in a will to live. This will to live as powerful and creates initiative and energy. While we are still in the midst of this pandemic, we will give folks something to look forward to to, a goal to reach. Columns George Payne says that trump's final act is a global tragedy. He writes that instead of a president who tried to take proactive steps towards stopping the coronavirus, we got a president who pretended it was not real. The only chance to stop it was missed, and he said that the president trump failed to seize that moment. In our cover story this week, Roches, the City School District Superintendent Terry Dade, tells ward of education in his budget presentation that this is as serious as it gets. Day told the board that for each item that they want to go back into the budget, something will have to come out in order to keep the plan balanced. The proposed budget totals more than nine hundred and forty eight million dollars. It calls for about fourteen million dollars more in revenue than the than the previous budget. However, that is offset by spending reductions and the plan does call does propose eliminating two hundred thirty six staff positions. That thank you so much, Patty, and, as always, you can find more detailed information on all the stories that Patty just mentioned on the minority reporter Dotnet. You can see all the stories in detail and you can also subscribe to the MINUIT reporter at the set as well. And, of course, if you have any story suggestions, tips or questions that you want to ask the staff of the minority reporter, you can send your emails to editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And also you can find links to the minority reporter, as well as past episodes of all the inside the margins episode episodes on our website in inside the margins. RADIOCOM and with that will go ahead and take a break. Patty, you stay right there. Will have more with petty singer after this. This is inside the margins. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Welcome back to you, inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson, and I'm here with petty singer from the minority reporter. All right, Patty, before we get into more covid stuff. Well, this is, I guess, still covid related. My guess is that this covid nineteen situation is not making things any...

...easier for budgeting for the Rochester City School district. Would you agree with that statement? That is that is true, because the budget, and I can find that here. They'll be rustling of papers during the whole time. All, you're fine. That is because, okay, so funding for the budget comes from the state, the city, the federal government and other sources, things like grants along those lines. So seventy seven percent comes from New York state. Now the budget, state budget was passed. Budget was passed on April first and the school district did get the thirty five million dollars it was seeking to cover last year, the last academic years deficit. So the state was already going into the budget cycle looking at what six billion dollar deficit before covid. So code is not cheap. No, no, is. It is taking a toll, financial toll and emotional toll, the whole bit. So financial part of that is going to have to be paid for somehow. The budget was worked on really before anybody knew how serious this was going to be. So the district is getting his money from the state. But, as you know, as our count this says, as Michael Lan says. Now what? Okay, maybe we're set for this year because of the way the budget was worked out before we knew this, but at some point these bills are going to come do and how much money are we going to have for other things when we're paying off covid? Right, right, it's a question I would ask you. I'm not sure if you would know the answer to this, but I'm going to ask. The fact that schools are pretty much closed right now and the schools can't get any extra income from things like sporting events and and and selling tickets and selling, you know, merchandise and food or whatever goes along with the sporting events and other activities that the school may have while it's operational, does that impact the budget as well? I don't know the budget line by line. My guess is that when you talk about extracurriculus things like that, there's probably some estimate for how much that will bring in. That's not the problem for them being, you know, sixty one million dollars in yeah, right, right, right, coming up. But but you're right, it does you know who been her and frank and right, take take care of the pennies in the pols. Take care of themselves. So yes, I mean all revenue matters, I mean, but the school still have expenses because the teachers are still being paid, they still have contracts, you know, people still in the contract and they're still receiving salaries. And don't forget, they still have to provide meals. Somebody is paying for all the meals that are being provided. So they still have expenses. Even though there's nobody in the classrooms. Education hasn't stopped right, right, right. Yeah, Nope, yeah, I certainly understand it. I know that the amount of money that the extracurricular stuff that the school does is probably not a lot, but I'm sure that it's still does go towards something of the school and they're probably lacking that. But at the same time, though, you're correct, they still have to pay the teachers. They sell to pay the faculty that's there. Is everyone there who are who was part of the schools that are they still getting some sort of compensation, and I'm a talking about just the teachers per se. I've talked about other faculty members who would be there, even like bus drivers, custodians, those those things. Are they still getting money as well? Well, my understanding is a contractual obligations apply. So, depending on what the contracts are, they they...

...would. They would have to live up to whatever the contract is. Now Custodians are working because the schools have to be cleaned right right shut down. So is every custodian working? Maybe, maybe not to probably want to limit the number of people who have access to these buildings, but the buildings do do have to be cleaned. So it wasn't like everybody just, you know, ran away and nobody. Nobody worked at all, I think. I don't know how they set up to get volunteers or people to do the meal things like that. But again I don't know what all that what each contractual group calls for. To know, if you're not driving a bus, are used to being paid. I don't know what the contract is with the gust drivers right. Another thing I wanted to talk about is that I know because I have a have a sixteen, almost seventheen year old daughter as well, and they've switched to online learning, as pretty much all the schools had. Now everyone's pretty much learning online, or they're having supplies delivered to them, or they're even setting up some instances where students can drive up to the school, almost like a drive through, the kind of drive up and they get handed their stuff and then they drive away, because they pretty much were forced implement these alternative forms of education. And this is more of a your opinion, because I know you you won't know the details of this question, but I wonder if this may be something that they may consider doing in the long and the long run, just giving students opportunities to distance learn, even at the high school level. I think that would have to be district by district because look at the city. There's a digital divide here right absolutely crest so many families. That don't mean we're sitting in our homes with plenty of computer equipment to do this, but there are a lot of I mean I'm sitting looking out my window in the city down a street and I guess that there may be homes and I'm looking down the street at that do not have access to US right. So then then it becomes a unequal I think if we go back to whatever the good old days were, I think distance, distance learning can certainly on meant things, but until you got everybody who who has all the equipment to do distance learning, and I can tell you so we're essential. Is A news organization. Yep, I could go into the office and I'll Boston set us up to work from home. I got to tell you, you know, days that the sun is out and I'm working from home, I would rather dig in my guarden, you know. So there's also the distraction effect of that. If I'm in the office and my colleagues are there and I'm distracted, I may go out for a walk around the building once or twice, get a little fresh air, come back and do my work. Is At my colleagues there that are also doing their work and I see, okay, we have to get this done, team work, all that stuff. I'm home and it's and if it's a nice day, temperatures fifty in me, and I you know, okay, if I started digging the guarden now, I've three beds. I don't want to do them all at once. I can do one today, I could do one a few days from now. I won't get so I'm thinking of all these other things and I'm not fifteen. So how do you commit a fifteen year old to total distance learning? I think there's a place for it when we get back to the good old days, but I think we're along way from replacing that until we're going to guarantee that every student in every school district has the access to be able so it has the tools. I thought you were seventeen, maybe eighteen, patty. So another question I I wanted to ask if we're going to just real quicker than I want to talk a little bit of out the mental health aspect as well, because we're on the subject of learning...

...a distance and I totally agree with you. I don't. I don't think it's probably something that's going to be sustainable for everyone. But but my thought process would be people with disabilities, people who have trouble maneuvering around the school, people who are incapacitated or stuck in a wheelchair. Perhaps this may be an alternative for them. Now, if they can, you know, it's very hard for them to get around the school building and maneuver from classroom the classroom. Maybe this is maybe this may be an option for them in the future. The first thing that comes to my mind is separate but equal. We get rid of that right a long time ago. Brown right, one thousand nine hundred and fifty four. You can't have but equal right. And we have the ADA and the buildings are supposed to be as welcoming to someone who can walk and open a door for themselves as someone who can't. And the other thing. Years ago I did a certificate course at one of our local institutions of higher learning and one of the courses was online and my critique at the end when we evaluated it was I cannot believe we paid money for this. There was, you know, after the first couple weeks, and again I'm not there could be some instructors that lead a wonderful online course, after the first couple weeks it was very hard to find these instructors to be online, to have, you know, to have the classroom. In my academic career that has spanned graduate degree, so I had, you know, I've been fortunate enough to attend a lot of classes over the years. I have found that I have learned more from my classmates in a discussion that I am ever from an instructor. And there's something about, yeah, you can chat and you can put your questions in, but as all of us who have done zoom conferencing in the last couple weeks have found out questions get missed. You, yeah, you can raise your hand and the function then somebody has to see it. I don't know, maybe I'm just old school. I just find that a facetoface in person classroom experience really can't be be Nope, I agree with you. I've done both online classes and in school and I've always preferred being in the classroom versus at home, which I guess the reason why I ask that question is you know the art of the segway. We're going to segue now about isolating from your students, and you're quite yeah, you like how I did that. Uh So, the fact of the matter is we, a lot of us, are stuck at home, and we were. You and I were kind of briefly the discussing this off are earlier. People situations are different. Some people, because they work, they use that opportunity to be away from everybody and that time that they're at work is used to get things done and it's kind of your own space. But now you're stuck with everyone in your household pretty much all the time and on the flip side. There are people who don't have family members in the household and they live alone. So they used getting out of the house as a way to see people and now they're stuck in the home by themselves all the time. Both aspects could be extremely mentally challenging, in my opinion. I think I don't know, we need opinion on that. I think that's probably could be proven out by by fact. I'm calling this the blizzard that will not end because we get stuck in a blizzard. It's two or three days. You go out, your shovel, you know, they clear the street, you're back to normal. This blizzard we have no idea when this wizard will end. So we have no idea when, when we're really going to be able to get out truly, you know, freely, finally get that last bit shoveled from the end of our driveway that the snowball keeps putting back...

...there, you know, and be able to bust through and bust out. And I think that is part of the anxiety. You know in a blizzard often the meteorized meteorologist are wrong and it lasts an extra day, but you know that blizards going to end at some point. And this the sun's going to come out, you're going to get outside by this is good. Just going to be over. Spring will common will melt. We're just stuck, I think, and such uncertainly. We don't know what it's going to end and I think that is adding to the emotional burden that people are carrying. When is it going to be over? Right, right. So now we were also talking Maror lovely waring is already pretty much closed access to parks. So people don't have that Avenue to exercise or to get away from it all. And I guess, so to speak, and that's being done now in New York City, where the parks are being closer. I remember when Cuomo give that speech about the parks still open, get outside, exercise, and that has been pretty much taken away now. So now your avenue of being outdoors and doing things as becoming smaller and smaller. You can still take a walk up and down the street. That's really as much as you can do now. And as the weather, as you said it when you sit out, when you're sitting at home, you see the sunshine and all you want to do is get outdoors and do stuff. Now that's being kind of taken away from you. That's going to be I think it's going to be really hard for a lot of people. Well, the the let me just back of the parks are open for a hiking, for jotting who. That's right, absolutely, Tay. Basketball. Rightty, you think of the park as the basketball whoop ris right. So I went by the tennis courts at Genese Valley Park the other day with the day she you know, sign this executive order, which was a Friday. I went by right after that and talk to people playing tennis and yeah, they will. They sort of expected this whatever. They still finish their tennis games. Not like they ran from the court when I said Hey, playing, no, rpd rolled up and said Hey, get off these wall. But you know, three days later I walked by there again and the nets were down. There were no nets on the tennis courts. I have not been by cobs hill to know if they took, you know, the the nets off the hook. Are you going to do? Take the hoops out of the ground? You can't do that. They didn't they you can't close off a ball field. You know, if you go out, if you take your son or daughter out to go play catch or go get some fly balls. You know, is our bed going to roll up on you and go you can't do this. You know, they don't want the pickup basketball games. They don't want to pick up soccer games. You know, I was going to invite a friend of mine to see if she wanted to go outdoors and hit pickle ball. Well, if the two of us are standing across a net from each other and there's only two of us, yes, we're maybe sharing the ball. When we brought some hands and you know, all these things. You think about the towns. Did the towns take down the pickle ball nets that are that are outside? You're right. So. So the things that we can do is getting smaller and smaller. I play hockey. We haven't had a hockey game to the rink closed in the beginning mar trait. So we haven't played blacking our last three or four weeks were we're canceled and I texted a friend the other day I wish I was a runner or could play hockey because I needed some vigorous physical activity right walk. I think guy I was I was just I was cranky. I'm annoyed. You know, I'm everything that a lot of people are feeling. A walk down the street wasn't going to do it for me. I needed vigorous physical activity, which is why, you know, on a sunny day I'm going to go out and dig in my garden, because that will be some vigorous activity for me, because I'm used to at least once a week playing hockey, having a vigorous, you know, vigorous exercise. Exactly right, I did. I did hear. A friend of mine told me, and I haven't not going to lie and say I play all the time. I used to play, but I don't play a lot of anymore. Golf. I heard that the golf course is some of...

...them are still open, which I can understand, me because if you are a golfer, you a lot of people have their own clubs and their own ball and if you if they separate people far enough you takes you a while to catch up to somebody. But I don't know if that's really vigorous either. I mean it can be. It's tough and it's the walk is nice, but that's and plus. Not everyone has the finances to play golf. Golf could be expensive as well, but but that's that's still one of the things I think you're still will do. But you're right. For the most part you can jog, you can hike, you can walk, but the the basketball, the tennis, that those kind of things are pretty much done and and I don't, I don't I get what you're saying. You can still walk in the parks, the partner stills and clothes, but the fact that you're not really supposed to do anything vigorous like that, I think it's still mentally frustrating to people. Well, it's it's part of the isolation because, granted, somebody will go out and shoe who's by themselves, but then the basketball sound, the basketball. You who will draw a coup? A lot of people. Absolutely yeah, if you're not playing a game, you're playing force. I guess we're playing around the world. So yeah, the walls being passed around, I mean it's limiting contact with other people and that is difficult to do for a long period of time for pack animals such as ourselves. Right. My last question for you, Patty, because you know why I've grown to become a friend of yours. Has We've been working at? How are you holding up all there? Thing one for you. You know in when you're in the news business, you've got to deal with this a lot. It's sometimes comforting and sometimes not, you know, to be in the news conferences and here all the stuff that's going on. It's sometimes it can be more overwhelming because we are bringing this information to you. You can choose, not right now, later when we're done, to turn off, you know, unplug your headphones, turn off your radio, all that kind of stuff. You can choose to do that. We have to put that out there for you. So it can be it can be draining. You know, the interesting and later we can do another time. We can pick this up. There's a big thing about trauma, trauma inform care, when you talk about kids with adverse childhood events and even with adults. What is the effect of trauma on people, Short term and long term? Everything about covid is mental health people. It's really the Yes is this is a physical illness, but truly, to me, in my world of ramifications, are far more and mental health. What is the trauma that we are going to deal with from this, from dealing with covid? Is it the trauma of a stranger walking down the street and they're not far enough away. Right? was there a new, stranger danger? Right, you know that we have what's what's the trauma that we have if we get diagnosed with the disease, any disease, but something is curable or not. I mean, these are things that were to be talking about and textbooks going to be written about three years, in decades. Yeah, this is this is changing the world. This is going a sense of world war three. It to my way of thinking, that what the involvement is and what the ramifications are. So I mean to get back to your question. I'm a menicognator, so I think about all this stuff, which is why, on a Sunny Day, I'm going to go out and play in the dirt and get some dirt therapy, because I'll look at my works, you know, and write and think about something else, because it Shakespeare said, the world is too much with us, and that is very, very true, and these past weeks and for who knows how much longer? Yeah, no, I agreed. After the world that is going to be here after this is over, I'm so curious to see how that's going to be. I'm everyone's different. Every so some people are were never huggers and handshakers, in the first place. So...

...their world may not change too much. But a person like me, who I've always been a person who shook hands and gave hugs. I'm a very, you know, physically affectionate type of person, I don't know how that's going to be received after this is all over. So that may just change the person that I am because of that. Who knows? I have no idea. We're going to see all that after this is over. But hanging there, patty, you still continue doing a great job. I you know I you do liver great news and I know the news is at all positive right now, but you keep positive. Promise me that at least. Patty seeing everybody. Thank you so much, Patti, for being with us today. All right, we're going to go ahead and take a break and when we come back we'll talk probably more mental health and also the Rock City Park. The Rock city showcase podcast is up and running and we're trying to bring you some some some happiness. Will talk about that as well. We'll be right back. This is inside them are. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Welcome back to inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. So we continue on with the Rock city showcase podcast and it's been doing very well. We're getting a lot of great feedback from it and I thank you all for listening. By the way, you can find all episodes of the Rock city showcase podcasts on our website. That's inside the margins, Radiocom and of course you can find it on the IHEART radio APP and I heart RADIOCOM and wherever you get your podcasts. So this week on, well this past week, the roxody showcase pad podcast, our guest was meteorologist Richard mcculla and he was great to talk to. I just want to share a clip of that with you and if you want to hear the the interview in entirety, you got to go to our website or I heart radio or wherever else you get your podcast. So so take a listen to this clip with Richard mcculla and we will end the show with that. Want you all to stay safe and remember this will pass. We will get through this and I also want to send my things to patty singer from the minority reporter. She's always fantastic and you can again go to the minority reporter Dotnet to get all the full versions of these stories and topics that we covered today. All right, we will see you next week. Enjoy this clip from the rock city showcase podcast. This is Matt Wilson from pree Type Virgins and we'll see you next time. This is the rock city showcase to Richard McCullough, meteorologists and broadcaster with thirty five years of television behind his back and radio as well. So another question, Richard. I saw I was doing a little homework on you and I saw that you are the president of the Rochster Association of Black Journalists, which I also think is pretty spectator because again, like I said, as a as an African American that and who was now in broadcasting myself, it's great to have leadership examples such as yourself. What made you want to get involved with that aspect of broadcasting? I think it's very important that to recognize the fact that we've had some fine, wonderful journalists and in this country, in our country, going back to the time of Douglas, Frederick Douglas who was probably one of the most famous journalists, and I think it's very...

...important to recognize that it we should be very proud of Douglas living and working here in Rochester. He inspires so much. It's so many people today, but I was honored to well, actually, let me tell you this some at when I first came to Rochester in one thousand nine hundred and ninety four, I was approached by the folks that the the the folks the black journalist, and I joined in ninety four. So I've been associated with this organization. It was the black communicate. It's initially I've been associated with him for twenty five years. I'm, you know, made Rochester my home and so I've been associated with him for years and I think it's very important that we tell our story. It's very important that we cover our stories. Is Very important that you have people of cut, black people, covering the news as well, so that we can be fair. They needs to be diversity in the coverage of news. You if you don't have the diversity, you don't have the sensitivity of understanding how topics, stories, how tragedies affect people. We need to tell our stories, we need to be represented and and I'm very proud to be, to have been the president since two thousand and fifteen. I've been elected a few times to lead the organization and I'm very proud about our work and and that's I think I'm very happy that you are too. I think it's amazing that you do that and it's you're definitely someone to look up to in the African American community. And I was talking to someone else the earlier there's a few stations, radio stations in general, that are that are that target and African American audience, but the bigger stations tend to not, and it's it was always nice to see you on the bigger networks representing brought African Americans in broadcasting, in journalism. So I think that's it's very important that you be recognized for that and I just want to I appreciate that you are a part of that. Thank you very much, mad I really appreciate it. I still see it as an honor and I don't I don't I'm not complacent, I'm not a I'm not to find. Let me just say this. I'm not defined by my image on television or radio. You know, I'm defined by WHO I am, but I mean I don't because famous fleeting is they say. But let me just say that it's an honor. I love what I this is the thing I wanted to do since I was a kid. And you know, a lot of times you see me on television for year, you see me smiling and I'm so happy and jubilant because I'm because I'm doing something I wanted to do. This is I was a kid. You know, I have people write me and say, well, why are you so cheerful? I say, well, because I'm very happy about I grew up. Tell you this. I mean by I lost my parents at an early age. Man, I mean my my mother and my father were my greatest mentors in my life and I knew, I you know they. I knew my mother for eight years and my father for twelve years. They imprinted in me the the course of what to follow in my life. They were the they were the ones that infrom. You learn by example, you learn, you learn from your parents, you learn from those elders and I learned and we learn. We we were five of US actually. We learn from them and how they themselves and how they ran the household, and it was not perfect by any means, but they were working class people and you know, we weren't rich or anything like that, but you know, we they worked hard and they stay and they impressed upon us the importance of education and we follow that. And let me tell you something. When my mother passed away, my father was raising us, and then in those three years after my mother passed away, we followed the same schedule. Getting up, going to work, going to school, rather going to school, and then when my father passed away the summer sixty nine, it...

...was the same thing. We just we got same schedule, stay in school, no nonsense, no drugs, no sex, none of that nonsense. We kept with our studies. We stayed with it. And this, you know, this is what this is the way I grew up. This is my experience. So I'm very happy about the course that I followed and and I'm jubilant and happy and I want to know, I want to send out positive energy, and that's why, that's why you see me so open and happy and that kind of thing, because it could have been worse. Right, absolutely right leaf. You know, you pass it are you become an orphan at twelve. You know it a lot of their a lot of meet things out there. there. There's a lot of evil out there in the world, but we stuck together. We made it happen. Absolutely excellent. No, that's and it's I said, it's a great choice. I know that you have your masters degree, so I know education is important. I'm actually still in school getting my master's degree. So someday I'll someday I'll catch you, Rishart. Someday, someday I'll catch you. I also very intrigued by this as well. I know and I've heard of the actually, yes, listen to a few of these as well. I know that you are involved with the American abilities television network. I think that's another fashioning thing, that that you are so intuned to help people who are hard appearing, who are suffering from hearing law, still get the news that they that they that they need and desire. Tell me how you got started in that. You know, this is one of the great things about living, just living. You learn and you meet so many people. I've you know, look, I grew up in Washington DC. It worked in Baltimore for several years and work in Los Angeles about a decade. I work, I worked and lived in Cincinnati. I live all over the country down to South Carolina. You learn, you meet a lot of people, diverse world that we live in. When I came Rochester, I I actually work with people that had hearing loss and and by the time I was about to leave channel ten, I was I talked to my pastor. I said, well, what, you know, what should I do now? We're about to leave this the station. I was thinking, this is the thing about me, Matt, I like challenges. I'm a person. I like challenges, you know, I like to be I like to be challenged by things, and so I was thinking what could I do to use my talents, my production talents and and so forth, what could I do to do something good for mankind? I guess I was, you know, thinking that light. And so I was looking at the cable television that we had there on the big channel tenstet the weather lab there, and I was looking at it as thinking, you know what, we have nothing here for people with hearing loss. What happens? What about people? I started looking at I started researching hearing loss and I found out that there was at the time it was like thirty million people had some kind of hearing loss. Hmmm, and then over time, now sixty million people have some kind of hearing loss. Man. So at the time when I left Channel Ten, I decided to start American abilities television network programming for people with hearing loss. I don't have hearing loss, but I met a lot of people here that do have hearing loss and I thought it would be an interesting challenge to try to create programming to help that segment of our population. So that's where it came from and I've been we've been worked. I've been on the CW since two thousand and eight and we we'll store. We're going very strong providing that information, education for people with hearing loss and ways to perfervent hearing loss, because a lot of times we young people don't realize that they're destroying their ears when they listen to loud music or with those little earbuds. Man, they can think it. Once you want you destroy...

...the ear, the ears, the cells in the ear, hair cells, once you destroy them, they don't grow back and and that once this hair cells are destroyed, you lose you're hearing. Do you have a topic that you would like to discuss on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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