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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 22 · 2 years ago

Police Reform in Rochester

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Well, hello and welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. News continues to happen, the protests continue to go on. There is a call for change, for more diversity, for, you know, to maybe defund the police, and we'll get more into that as well. Also, we have openings. Phase three is now official, so more businesses are open. And what does that mean? Maybe we'll touching that as well. But before we get into those topics, let's go ahead and get into our headline news with the minority reporters, petty singer, Hey Patty, how are you? Hi, Matt, thanks so much so. In what will be an ongoing story which is just going to change and develop in the days and reeks to come, state legislator, who legislators have pushed for police reform. One of the big things they're pushing for is opening police personnel records, saying that that would make law enforcement departments more trend as parent and helped address issues of brutality. According to proponents of this reform, what has closed records is called the privacy rule, is known as fifty a. That prevents the public from knowing whether a police officer has been disciplined. will also applies to firefighters, paramedics and correction officers. Repeal of fifty a is a cornerstone of legislation pushed by the Black Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus, and it was signed into law by Governor Andrew Cuomo. It was one of several pieces of legislation aimed at police reform. In some neighborhood news, the west side farmers market is opening under covid nineteen guidelines. The market supports local farmers and small businesses. Open for the season on June ninth. It runs to mid October. The markets in the parking lot of St Monica Church at eight three one genesee street. Covid guidelines mean that the market will not have gatherings, but it is a safe place to buy food and wash stations are available. And all farmers, vendors and volunteers will be wearing masks. Physical distancing will be practiced. The divine nine exceeded a fundraising goal for food length the Rochester Black Greek letter organizations exceeded the goal that it had set. The goal was twenty five hundred dollars and in an online event, the divine nine, as the local the organization is known, raised three thousand seven hundred and forty eight dollars. Lap Steel Guitars, dark Everett Campbell died, but his music and his logs live on. Campbell, the lap steel guitarist of the Rochester based group Campbell brothers, died may eleventh the age of fifty three. In Georgia. Campbell formed a band with his family called the Campbell brothers, consisted of Chuck and Philip and Philips Sun Carlton. The band began in the late s and played a significant role in mainstreaming the sound known as sacred steel music. Rally's reinforced the message that black lives matter. For eight minutes and forty six seconds, under a relentless Sun and the cloudless Guy James Wilson Knelt on a concrete sidewalk along genesee street. The license practical nurse at the Woodwood Health Center, which is part of Anthony Jordan Health Center, participated in the white coat take a knee. That happened on June fifth. It was part of a weekend of rallies, protests and memorial events for George Floyd...

...and other victims of police violence. More on the census. In this week's edition we talked about the federal funding where that the census. Why the sense is important for federal funding, congressional representation, business decisions and also the important of having every child counted. In opinion and editorial, drome Underwood and Don braveman right that the covid nineteen pandemic as painfully reminded us of long existing disparities in the way people are treated in this country. When Roe County is not immune to the inequity of suffering being an education, housing, employment, promote justice or healthcare, people of color have experienced that's we disproportionate outcomes. For decades. Those items and more are commonly referred to as social determinants of health and these undesirable outcomes are evidence of the trench systemic institutionalized racism and in the BIS quiz section. This Week Kim Mitchell answers a reader who asks how they can write a business plan. Mitchell answers about the research that can be done for a business plan and what the elements are for a successful business plan which can lead to a successful business. That thank you so much, Patty. As usual and as always, if you want to see the full versions of these headline stories, you can go to the minority reporter Dotnet and you can see the entire stories that we that she just mentioned. Also, you have the opportunity to subscribe to the minority reporter on the site, and I always say this, I'm always will. I suggest that you do. Supporting local media as certainly important, especially in these kind of times, and I think the minority reporter gives the you the information that you can use, especially for, you know, these times in this climate. So certainly go ahead and subscribe to that if you have the opportunity. Also, you can catch any episode of inside the margins, including this one or any other ones that you missed, on our website at inside the margins, Radiocom and also wherever you can get your podcast, where everywhere I hired apple, wherever you get your podcast. You you should be able to find this as well and you we also have links to the minority reporter on that site and you can also submit questions to us as well. Okay, let's go ahead and take a quick break. This is inside the margins. Will be right back. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. It's Matt and Patty and this is inside the margins. Welcome back. All right, Patty, let's go ahead and get into it. There's a lot, a lot to talk about this week. So the one thing I want to jump right into because one of the studios that I work at happens to be right where the some Murr Muriel was play. I can't talk today. Murals was a painted. The black lives matter mural is painted on the street right by Mlk Park and Manton Square. It's, you know, very nicely done. It's huge. I couldn't even get a full photograph of it from the sixteen floor. But the thing that I worry about is it's more like a Bandwigan thing, because a lot of different cities across the country are doing that. They're painting the BLM or the black lives matter wording on streets, which is great. I mean again, that's there's a nice that we're getting that that out there. But I think in my opinion, and I'll let you you know, retort this as well, it's almost like shiny key syndrome, like you see all these murials and paintings...

...and beautiful things, but that's not actually getting anything done. It may distract people thinking that this is look at the look at what we've done, and maybe makes you not focus on okay, we have these protests going going on, we have the attention of America right now. This is probably the time to now try to push things forward and get things done rather than just have beautiful paintings and pictures about what's happening. What's your thoughts on that? Well, okay, we're to begin. I guess my question I had when I found this was being painted on the street is that cars are going to go over this, it's going to get messy and as it gets messy and not touched up right away, what is that going to say? We can't keep crosswalks painted in this community. Right sometimes you go places and the tape will come up on them or whatever. You know, just drive around, walk around and see see how crosswalks to have fallen into disrepair. crosswalks do not, are not emotionally politically charged. My concern is that as cars go over this and it shows somewhere and tear, what happens? People may think that's a ridiculous thing to be concerned about, but if this is a symbol of something bigger than that, how we treat that symbol can be interpreted. Yep, and I agree with that. I okay, so right now, as as I well, as I went to the building a few days ago, they had it blocked off and I haven't seen it since. I got to check it out and see if it's still blocked out so you couldn't drive over it. But eventually they're going to have to open it up because people, people are going to park there. That's it. That's going to be a heavily used traffic area. So you make a good point. If you want to have a piece of artwork and of display what's happening in the times, you're right. I don't think putting it on a street that's going to be driven on. It's probably the best the best way to demonstrate that, because it's eventually going to not look as pristine as it did when you first did it. Again, like I said, I'm not knocking the artist. He did a he did a very good job. I know doing a painting that size is extremely difficult, so kudos to the artist that that took that took his time and I heard that volunteers came and even helped them with it. So that's all. That's cool, but I again just coming from my standpoint. I think now is the time to start actually having things done, start meeting with people that can get things done. I know, I know governor Cuomo's already mandated that the New York state police departments across the state tried to start doing things to restructure the police force to try to make things, you know, more acceptable, more acceptable and also involved the community a little bit more. As far as what's happening, these are the things that we had ship we should be focused on and trying to actually get things done for real the paintings and in the artwork and all that stuff. It's great and I don't want to take anything away from anyone who's doing things like that, but the the world. We now have the attention of the world. The world is now aware of what's going on. Every country around the planet knows that we're doing this. So now that we have everyone's attention, instead of continuing to do beautiful artworks and stuff, let's now say, okay, now that we got your ears, what are we going to do to resolve the problem that? I think that's what we should be doing now. Agree, but one of the things I'm hearing is, all are we rushing now? People will argue, you know, four hundred years. Come on, you've had enough time. It's been four hundred years. Understood, but when you let's talk about involving the community in changing the dynamic of the of the police force.

Okay, so what is the community? Mayor Warren was in a news conference earlier in this week and was asked. One of the questions she was asked was, well, what do you think about defunding police? And she responded by saying she gets an equal number of emails a day from people saying don't defund the police and she has to serve the entire community. Right. So when we talk about community involvement in what a twenty one century police force looks like. What is the community that gets involved and that community if, if a portion of our community has been saying we have not been represented historically, we have not been listened to, our concerns have not been been addressed, we want to be involved now. If other segments of the community are pushed away, is that justice? That's I think that's a really fair question at I'm going to try to answer that the sort of I guess I'll all address it on the I don't think I can answer it about I'll address it. So when you look at the protests that have been happening, especially around this area, the cool thing that I've noticed about the protest is they're very multicultural. They're very diverse. You see an ECLECTIC combination of all races, genders, creeds. It's not just a bunch of African Americans marching. It's pretty much a lot of people. So in my opinion, I think that we can do something abou now. Now this is again. This is another pearent opinion I have. I was reading something in the paper and wasn't a local paper. Was it was a national paper and it was in regards to a police officer in DC and the protesters were approaching him and he's an African American police officer and they're like why are you a cop? And he's like, well, do you want me to not be a cop? Because if if people like me aren't police officers, then the police force is all white. Is that what you want? And the protester was like no, that's not what we want, and the and the COP explain, Hey, when I take my uniform off, I'm a black man. I'm a black officer right now, but when the day is over and the uniforms off, I am now an African American male. So when I get pulled over, I have to be I do the same things that that most African American meals do. Have to be very slow, explain everything, especially if I'm carrying my piece from work. I got to tell them, you know, hey, I'm a police officer, there's a gun in the car, I want to get my wallet. kind of please get my wallet, because I got to do all that stuff because I he can he he was describing that. He understands what it's spike and and the problems that people go through. So he wants to be part of the solution to and he thinks that him being a part of the police force as a positive thing because he experiences both. He experienced his life as a police officer and he experienced his life as a black man, and I think people like that definitely need to be involved with what should we do, because they know how they're treated when they're not in uniform and they know how the treated when they are in uniform, and it's I think it goes both ways. Sometimes people can get a little harsh, especially in these times, against the police because they've seen and then dealt with a lot of the negative that's been seen by the police. And sometimes the police can be harsh on the African American community. We can. You've seen what happens to the African American community as well. So we need to find balance there. We have to find a balance and we end, I think, having people who represent all walks of life in the suburbs, in the city, in the nicer parts, White, black, Puerto Rican, Asian police officers, police officers of all colors. They should all be part of what this new thing is going to be. Should not just be, you know, okay, it's the same police force. We're just going to change the rules a little bit. Now we have that everyone kind of get involved in and talk about what's appropriate and what's not appropriate. Right. So a couple things on that. So the ECLECTIC mix of people agreed. But that group...

...of people was of one mind, which was do you from the cop right, right, FN pig and flipping them off as they as they walked away after the police had created a safe space, and then blocking traffic making sure nobody rogue, you know, got in to try to try to mess it up. So they were. They were different, of different colors, different races, different sexual orientations, whatever, but they were of one mind, which was police are bad and so and that said so for me saying that the community, you would need to find people who want police, who like support, not like police, that's that's a that's a value, but who support what police do for communities. They need to be represented as well, and the point you made about having police representation on this is absolutely huge. And the police, you know, the police organizations in this state, are very upset right now because last year they had to deal with criminal justice reform, of which went which was passed without any input from law enforcement. And so now we have and and you know for good reason. Bail should not be proxy for poverty, a poverty proxy for bail. I fight if I have that backwards. Just because you you can't afford five hundred dollars shouldn't mean you sit in jail for a long period of time waiting for your case to come up. But in between that and letting somebody in, giving an appearance ticket for somebody who has a low level who has committed some type of violent offense isn't the answer either. All right, so you have to come up with something in the middle. Police were not invited to that discussion. Now to criticize the police. They were not very articulate when they held news conferences a year ago about why the exact what they wanted. Asked, what do you want? They just they jumped up and down and said we don't like what we have. So they weren't they weren't terribly constructive, you know, all right, but but but at the same time, you know, in a sense they had a point. You change the rules of us and you didn't ask us. They're saying the same thing now. Okay, so an excerpt from a letder that local Patrick Phalan, who is the chief of police in Greece, is the president of the New York State Association of Chiefs of Police. He wrote a letter with Jeffrey Murphy, who is a sheriff, who is the President of the Sheriff's Association, and the last paragraph of their letter says the time has come to hear each other, to support each other into work collaborative, collaboratively to bring clear, transparent and bacbased information, ideas and reforms forward. Let us work together to affect the positive change we all wish to see. Let's do so in a way that accomplishes our goals without endangering the police officers who already risk so much for the communities that they serve. I would I would put forth that, no matter what side of this debate you're on, you really can't disagree a whole lot with that statement. No, because if you're saying we need reform, we have to have reform, then if someone says okay, yes, let's get to reform, let's sit down and talk about this, not shout at each other about this. Right all, right now, that point I agree with totally. I think that's the problem is that it's the problem is the climate and the end even the climate before what happened to George Floyd. Unfortunately, we are in a very, very divisive climate right now. We have been for quite some time, and it's really hard for someone, and I'm not trying to disrepect anybody, but someone sensible, to talk, because everyone is either this side or...

...that side. It can't be like hey, let's talk and kind of figure out what works the best, because that's the only way that I think that we're going to have a resolution. You can't not you can't get eradicate everything and make it just one way, because if you do your you're neglecting the other side and they're going to be very upset and no one's ever going to get anything accomplished and they're going to be angry, and that's what we got to stop. We we have to talks have to start happening right now. What's happening is aren't talk. There two sides yelling. They are angry people who are angry at the police and they're angry. Police are angry at the people that are angry at the police and everyone's yelling at each other. We have the okay, everyone's stopped yelling. Let's let's have a meeting, let's sit down, let's discuss what what's what is the best outcome? We still need law enforcement. You can't have people even even just minor stuff, but if you don't have lights, traffic lights, but if people just running around driving through trafic lights without without without any you know, revocations for running a red light and crashing into people, you there has to be some sort of law. But they're also has to be justice, and I think that's where the problem is. One side sometimes just wants law and order, just law and and and you know, you need to obey. Other people just want justice that. They don't want law this. They don't want law, they want just to see justice for what's happened. You need law and you need justice. You need a little bit of both and we have to we have to balance that out somehow. Correct and and and one of the things you mentioned before, and and I think even in this letter which is on it's The New York, New York Association of Chiefs of Police, their facebook page, so it's New York State Association of Chiefs of Police. Their facebook page has this entire it's entire letter. So seizing the moment. They letter at the letter mentions that and I think you may have I thought I'd heard you say that earlier in our in our conversation. But so this is a moment and people want to see the momentum. Go with the momentum, carpet dium, all that, all that stuff. When you do that, though, when you see something, when you when you react quickly, you may be acting out of haste and not completely thought through. So I'm going to make it may not be the best analogy, but it's one that comes to mind right away. In the COVID situation there was an awful lot of pressure open business now. Do it now, open now that we had some local businesses that wanted to do dying in seating way. I think the way even before phase one, and we had a supervisor who wanted to do outdoor seating before that was allowed, and governor came up and said no, we're going to do this in a phased, in measured way. And that was Covid, which you also could argue as life and death. Yeah, right, people do fund it. Some of people in our own community have died from that. Yeah, far more people than have died from police violence. I wouldn't we met two hundred and forty seven people in what three months have died from covid so if you're just looking at numbers, I'm not saying one's right one's wrong, but if you just look at, just excuse me, the numbers of this, that's a lot of people. And the state in our region and says every single day we are taking a measured approach to this. What is the difference? Why can't we take a measured approach in reforming police over a short period of time, not saying you know, okay, we're going to let this go another forty years? No governor has said a deadline of April first for the police to reinvent themselves. That's not that may be enough time for odden. It may not even enough time for Brockport, because talk...

...about all the issues that are going out there right now. Maybe enough time for I did, maybe enough time for fairport. Is it enough time for our PD? Is it enough time for the county? Right you look at the number of people served in the diversity of that constituency. So why are we so slow and measured in covid which is taking lives on a weekly basis in our community and we are rushing in something that will affect every citizen, because law enforcement touches everybody in one way, shape or form, and seemingly at a breakneckt speed into that. Well, here's I'm going to flip that a little bit too. You are correct as far as we're opening, but what about closing? As soon as a death rate started hitting everything, we shout everything down, we shut everything down right and that's kind of right now. Now we're not reopening the police and stuff. We're kind of we're coming in that shut things download right now. You just what I'm saying things. Finally, it took a long time because a lot of a lot of police violence or racial profiling or even in the time when there was, you know, the Stop and Frisk thing that they were doing, which is which is terrible thing, but that wasn't capture on film. People weren't seeing all this stuff. So this is one of those instances where everyone and in the world got to see this guy die by being apprehended in cops, but by police. So when the numbers and covid hit, we shut it down and now we're kind of in the phase of real reopening the rioting in the protest. This is kind of the shut it down phase right. This is kind of about we we've seen what's happening. We now need to shut this time. We need to put a stop to it and then we got to figure out how to fix it. So you and one instance I'm going to agree with you. We definitely don't want to rush things, but we do want to see the moment. We don't want to see the moment where we're like canceling, like I saw there's a there's a crowd of cancel paw patrol, the the puppy that play like the like the COP character and on paw patrol. That's ridiculous. I don't know what that's not going to do anything. Where they took the guns away from Elmer Fudd or whatever. You know, those things are stupid knee jerk reacts at that aren't going to solve anything. But we shouldn't put anything to law right away. But the talks should be happening right now. The sooner the talks began to happen the LET. The sooner people stop yelling and being so angry. If we're doing if the thing with with group think, and I know we talked about group thing a lot, is if people are protesting and they don't see anything happening, they're going to continue to protests, are going to continue to be mad or can continue to do things until they start seeing things happen. So the only way to stop all this nonsense is as as to start at least show that you're doing something right. But if you just if you too, okay. So if you show your doing something, is there a risk in it? There's an expression, and I'm going to be pusher it, but something when you'd something, when need something done. Ask anybody who do nothing or something, something along those lines. It's kind of a running around in a circle. Right now. I got saying is that, yes, this is a moment where let's turn a moment into into an hour, a day, a week, a month. Right, let's not let a moment, a moment can pass. But how do we stretch out this moment into something that is going to be meaningful? What are we going to let's look, let's let's go fifty years in the future and let's look at the Review Mirror, let's look at the history books, and what do we want written about this time, bright that we made something meaningful. All right. So in the the package of legislation that was proposed by this caucus, repeal a fifty a governor, sign that...

...false n one one complaints. Governor, sign that office of a special prosecutor. Sign that. There were a couple things that I thought should have been important that he did not put in right away on this, one of which was medical attention for persons under arrest and issue a fairy to obtain medical care. Right, not, that's that's that would be that. That officer who walked by, yeah, the buffle, that's right, and he wanted to stop and do something should have great. So, granted the fact that there was a medic fifteen seconds behind. Does that count in this or not? But but here's something about rushing, rushing something in all right, falts nine and one complaints. So under under the law, Governor's law prohibiting race based nine one one calls, and you can look online, a minority reporter, we have the Senate and the assembly build numbers here. Recent years have shown a number of frivolous and false calls to nine hundred and one one based on the call was personal discomfort with other people and not for any particular threat. The new law makes it a civil rights violation to call nine hundred and one one to report a non emergency incident involving a member of a protected class without reason to suspect a crime or and imminent threat. So My, my scent, my feeling of personal safety is not going to be yours. Your your a, your male, I'm female. You're a larger person than I am. There's physical dimensions involved here, all kinds of stuff. All Right, I send a note to Rogers Squeeze Department asking what this law will mean for nuisance complaints, Loud Stereos, loud parties, people in their yards late at night making noise in neighborhoods. To make that call is that? Now is the caller subject to being arrested for violating someone civil rights? When the base is really loud in that car? It's been in front of the House for twenty minutes. By the time an officer gets there the car's probably gone, so there's nothing there. They go up to the house. Did you have a lot of car here? Know of the person. I'm going to charge that person with making a false call and it's race bating. That's one of my concerns about rushing into things. No, right, and I agree. I know we don't have a couple minutes left, but yet I agree with that. The talks of that have to be have because you're right, you don't want that, but you also don't want like you've seen me for the lady calling the police because the guys having a barbecue. You know that. We also don't. We don't want to, we don't. We don't want either. Are Those happening? So you're but you're right. And when I say take action, I don't mean hastefully put laws into action. I mean here's I guess what I'm saying, and after this week we're not to going. Fortunately, back in the s there was the Rodney King Incident and Rodney King was pretty much beat on television in front of everybody, and that incided riots as well. What was the outcome of that? Nothing, nothing changed. No, no, no rules are put in place, nothing change. People, people saw it happened, people got bad, people rioted, people protested and I think the cops were even quit it at first. So really absolutely nothing happened. The moment was not taken advantage of people got mad and rioted and then they pretty much forgot that it happened and nothing happened this time. I think that time it was mostly just United States that have their eyes open. This time the whole world has her eyes open. There are other countries also protesting alongside the United States. Eyes are open, everyone's watching. Now that everyone's watching, things should start to happen. I hope at least people want to initiate stuff to have happened. We don't want to have the same you know instance happened where this guy's, you know, dead on film.

Everyone's mad at their protests and then we're back to square one again. We don't we don't want that way. We have to have things actually change. It happen this time around. Correct. But are the people who lead rallies and protests able to make that transition to creating change, or do you now need a new set of people so so every everybody realizes, okay, now we need to make change. Do we now need a new set of people to lead that, to lead those those negotiations to change? Can the same? It's easy. It's my analogies. It's easy to get elected, hard to govern. No, no, I so I agree with you. Whatever you want to get elected, right, but okay, now I've got to govern. So we've got this moment. We've coalesced people. Now we need to turn this into something that in fifty years we're going to look back and be proud on. Can the same people do that or now? Do we need a new set of people on both sides to come and get that work done? Right? Nope, I totally agree with that. And after this we're gonna have to get out of here. It's like if I if I know that I something bad has happened to me and I know that I've been wrong, I'm not. I'm probably not going to keep my for myself. I'm going to hire a lawyer who's probably going to be more articulate with the law in order to speak on my behalf. It's same kind of thing. You're right, the people who are angry and leading the protest may not be the actual people that should actually speak on it, because the people who are put into the position to speak on it may have a better understanding of law and can be more articulate about it. Patty, as usual, thank you so much for joining us. Don't forget guys, make sure you check out the minority reporter on the minority reporter Dotnet for all the stories that that you heard Patty talk about on the headline news portion and also, like I said, you got to support local media. Subscribe if you can. Patty. Thank you so much. I always appreciate you my pleasure. Will talk next week. We certainly will. All right, let's go and take a break. This is inside the margins. We will be right back. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. All right, so what I want everyone to take away from this show this week is the importance of conversation. Now I've I've seen both sides here, on the pro black lives matter movement side or the African American side. They're tired of explaining. They'RE TIRED OF PEOPLE NOT UNDERSTANDING WHY we're upset. They're tired of not people not understanding why this movement is needed. They're tired of trying to explain themselves. They think that people should now understand after so many years of this going on and on and on, that you should already know what this is about. You should understand what the black lives matter movement is about, and there's no need to explain it to you. And if and if you don't get it now, then you must be one of the enemies. I've also talked, and this just happened recently, to a person who completely did not understand what black lives matter was because they were only getting their information from one or two different news sources, and those new sources were describing and defining the black lives matter movement as a terrorist organization, terrorist organization that is trying to overthrow white people and, you know, slaughter and kill them and on all that stuff. Now that's ridiculous, obviously, but here's the thing. She generally genuinely believe that because she was told this by her friends and also all the news sources, and...

...she was given fake documents in fake memes that kind of coincided with her theories. I'm not making this up, this is true. So after I educated her and brought her to the actual black lives matters matters of website and she could see exactly what the movement was about, she changed her viewpoints. And she apologize and she and everything, and that's my point. You can't draw lines in the sand if you want to move forward. I've always said this and I will always say this. Racism is strictly based on fear. When people are afraid, that's when people start to hate. If they're afraid of what you're going to do to them, if they're afraid that you're going to overthrow them or you're going to are you're going to take over their towns or take away their guns. You know, you've seen all that stuff, right. So when people are afraid, they get defensive and they become a little more, I would say, racist. I'm not trying to defend anybody. Obviously be some people just will never get it. But don't turn your back on everybody because some people are being some people are just being misled. Some people are in the wrong circle. They have friends who are pretending to be loving of everyone and they and they're trying to convince their friends that this movement, movement that's happening is against, you know, unity, against everyone being together, and we all know that's not true. The majority of people listen to the show probably understand that that's not true. But some people genuinely believe that. And again it's not because they have hatred in their hearts, because they're being misled. So don't turn your back to them, don't turn away from them, don't say well, you should know, and if you don't know, you're part of the problem. I'm not going to help you know. We need to come together to make things change. We've tried this before. We've had riots before. We've had lights and sixty four, we've had riots during the Rottney King beating. We've done this before and things haven't changed. There's a reason for that, because we get mad and we riot and we beat our chest and we tell everyone what we want, but then we don't actually have the talks and have things change. The convert this is it. This is our chance. It's not even just the United States looking. The whole world is watching us right now. Other countries are participating in demonstrations as well. Most people understand now that things have to change. We have finally gotten the attention of everybody. Now it's time time to have those talks, to actually implement change. We can't just continue to be upset and point fingers. We have to say, okay, now you know there's a problem. Let's talk about resolving this problem. And that's where we are now. We don't want to rush into anything. We don't want to, you know, settle for things that aren't really going to help us, but it's time now. It is time to have those talks and I love seeing everyone come together and I love seeing the protests and I where I work, I have a great vantage point. I use it to see a lot of it and it makes it warms my heart because because if you, if you've, I've she been to one of them and if you and if you have a chance to go or you see it, it's a diverse crowd. It's a very diverse crowd. White, black, women, men, Puerto Rican, Asian, whatever. Everybody's involved because everyone wants change, and that's good, because it looks like the majority of people are on our side. There are obviously going to be people who are not that. That is that, but they...

...are. There are those people that are confused. Yes, there are people that are against it and there are people that are for it, and then there's that funny middle area where people are just confused and don't understand what's going on. And if you want to implement change. The best way to do it is to have talks and that everybody understand what's going on and then talk to the people who are empowered to actually get those changes in action. Thanks, as always, for listening. I certainly appreciate it. I know these are weird times. We're going to get through this together. We're community and will always be a community. I'm ATT Wilson. This is inside the margins. Will see you next week. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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