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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 36 · 2 years ago

Rochester Police Accountability Board's New Executive Director

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The Rochester Police Accountability Board names it's new Exectutive Director and staying safe for Halloween.

You're listening to one hundred nine FM, W X R LP, in Rochester, New York, the home of extreme independent radio. Find us at one hundred and nine w Xi rcom Hey, everyone, can Jan the cruise here inviting you to check out my new show, vibe out with Kajana on one hundred point nine w x ir, extreme independent radio. Now, this show focuses on Jazz, blues and Soul Music from all eras, on the arts of all kinds, and was created to be a platform to help local and indie artists get more exposure. So if you are looking for a place to listen to jazz, Blues, Soul Music and music by local artists, then come vibe out with Kajana every Tuesday afternoon, two, two, four PM on one hundred point nine w x ir, extreme independent radio. Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Now, it's true that Rochester is facing a financial crisis, but we're also facing the public safety crisis. One costume this city not only the lives of its people but untold millions and settlements and police overtime. Investing in institutions led by local people committed to long term community driven change. It's not just the right thing to do, it's a money saver. With the resources it needs, this board will how Rochester become a national model for reimagining public safety. Now this board has been working tirelessly and we'll continue to do so. Our immediate priorities are these. will be hiring diverse, talented staff to supplement this board's expertise. Will be sitting down with our community and its leaders and we'll be educating the public about our powers and the work ahead. Lasting change comes from the community, from the bottom up. This board has been moving with our community every step of the way. We're going to keep up. So it's time for me to get to work. Thank you. Hello and welcome to you inside the margins. This is Matt Wilson and you just heard this. That was reports from the minority reporter about Connor Dwyer Reynolds being selected as the executive director for the board the police, I kind of dully board, and we're certainly going to get into that into more detail after we do our headline news. We're also going to talk about Halloween. Now a lot of you, just like myself, have younger kids who, you know, this is a big one of the biggest times of the year for them. Right they love Christmas and then Halloween's probably the second best thing for them because I get all that candy. But obviously covid is going to impact that. So we'll talk about that as well and go over some guidelines. But before we get into both of those stories, let me go ahead and introduce someone who gives meet guidelines to keep me on the right path. It's the minority reporters, patty singer. Hello and good after you, Patty. Every week the pressure you well, talking to somebody last week, we said the only person we can control is ourselves. Right exactly. I you know, I I'm big into...

...hell. Have a background, and not could, not a critical background, but in health and health education. So I do try to share that knowledge. I hope I don't say the word should, should be a full of shouldn't should. So I hope, but thank you and thank you for this week's pressure. I appreciate that. Well, my pleasure, fatty. So I guess we're going to jump right into it after that. Absolutely let's go right ahead any longer. As you know, it's every week seems to be busier than the previous one. In the past week, City Council committee will consider a law firms deep dive into roches police department policies. Council voted eight hundred and two on October thirteen to send the proposal to hire wilmore Hale to the public safety, Youth and Recreation Committee. New York has made June teeth a holiday. Governor Cuomo on October fourteen signed that legislation. Deadlines, you should be a well, there I said that word deadlines. Along the way to the November Third Election Day, we suggestion be aware of early voting, which begins on October twenty four runs through November. First at various places in the city and in some of the town's. University of Rochester Medical Center has announced and it's equity and Anti Racism Action Plan. Some of that plan comes from what Medical Center CEO Mark Toddman said on June thirteen at a rally organized by the Black Physicians Network. The mayor answers community questions at a local church, not just a Marrit lovely Warren was a guest at First Church of God last week and she took question from members on a variety of issues. A new role will give patients more access to their medical record, and that may cause confusion and worry. The federal regulation takes effect November two and it will mean that test results, such as imaging, will be in a patient's chart, perhaps before their doctor has been able to explain the results to them. In more health news, what should response to a mental health crisis look like? Many people in the community are not just reimagining police but reimagining the response to someone who is in a mental health crisis. And other election news. For people bringing absentee ballots to polling places, the Monroe County Elections Commissioners have decided on which type of box to use to collect those ballots and in opinion. George Pain writes that disagreeing with respect is a patriotic duty, and Reverend Michael Vaughan rights about change from within. That's thank you, Patty, which is a wise woman who once told me I should not shut all over myself, so I tried not to as well. Thank you for the headline news here and if you want to hear the full versions of the heatlines that Patty just talked about, make sure you visit the minority reporter Dotnet. You can get the full versions of the headlines. They're great for all the information that you need for local things that are going around, like you're heard here also. It is also something you got to do support local journalism. It's very important if you want to hear stories that are important to you in your community, you have to support the you're list to tell the stories. So go ahead and subscribe to the minor reporter. You also have a chance to by the way, I also want to mention you can get a digital or a hard copy version, with whichever your preference is, so go ahead and take that option as well. If you have a suggestion or if you have any comments or questions, you can send that to the minority reporter as well. You can do that by sending your email to editor at minority reporter Dotnet and they can take that up with you and see if they can implement your ideas of suggestions. And, as usual, if you want to hear any past...

...episodes of inside the margins, go to our website which is inside the margins RADIOCOM. You'll hear this one after it airs, of course, and all the other ones previously that we've done will be available on that website. And also the rock city showcase is found there as well. That's more of an entertainment show. So if you're looking for local artists and entertainment and food stuff like that, check out the rock city showcase. You get your information on that as well. All right, when we come back we will talk about the new chief of them, sorry, the executive director of the Police Account Accountability Board, Connor Dwire Reynolds. Also Halloween and more on inside the margins. Will be right back. Hey, welcome back. It's Matt and I'm here with patty singer from the minority reporter, and Kudos to Patty and the minor minor reporter for being out there and getting the information about Connor dwire reynolds becoming the executive director to oversee the Police Accountability Board. And it's funny. Last week we talked about everything comes down some money, and you know the lack of the money that the police have and money money. Money is pretty much the focus of earth because no one really has money, and I think that was kind of a topic also. That was brought up when Connor dwire around was talking about how the Accountability Board could be successful. When it was that correct, Patty, that's that's what I heard. You know, he is as equip says. He started off by saying three things. You know, the Board has the board has the expertise to do this. Of the board's going to continue to work hard, and then he says, you know, with with the right financial resources. You know, and I don't know what is what is the right financial resources? I mean the the Charter for the Police Accountability Board doesn't give a specific doesn't say it's going to get x number of dollars, right, is it? Excuse me, a talks about sufficient funding. What is sufficient funding? He went on. He compared, he brought up Oakland, California's Police Accountability Board, Type Review, a civilian review board. See, he said, you know, they ad four million dollars and they have a backlog of cases. I don't know. I mean to me as a as a is a city resident who wants to see the best public safety we can have and again that term. Were starting to her hear the term public safety order the term policing. Oh, if public safety is the umbrella term, or if that's you know, if you're in whatever grade, you learn to write an outline, right, Roman numeral number one, public hey, you know, policing, be mental health, see social services, whatever falls under that public safety. We're starting to hear more of this public safety. So then the question has to be asked. Well, what is public safety? To some people it is policing. To other people, which, as the article just we talked about, response to mental health. To other it is it is social and economic in the sense of fair housing, right, you know, those types of resources, making sure people have those, because if people have safe places to live then you know, the need for policing maybe reduced. So so what it? What is public safety? So right now we look at it as policing. Yeah, change that, make that, make that broader, but there's still the same pot of money. All right, so if you're not going to necessarily, right now there's about seven hundred torn officers in the Roche's police department. They all need, you know, a salary and health benefits and things like that. So if you want to reallocate money. We're are you taking it from to put some place else? And is there, if you use the Oakland model,...

...is there four million dollars? I mean, what is the price tag really for the Police Accountability Board, the nine members? It's voluntary, non compensated. Right. So He, you know, he reynolds, talked about the money that they have. Now. He gave a figure of four hundredzero dollars. I did not see that when I read the Charter. When I when I read the bill, I didn't see a dollar a month. So that may have been what was what's been talked about. Initially four Hundredzero. He has a salary range of about seventy two to the there's a salary range for the Executive Director of seventy two to the mid S. We don't know exactly what his salary is going to be. So he talked about four hundredzero dollars. You could that can hire about four or fulltime staff and the answilaries that they would need to do their job. But he talked about, you know, there's a potential to have lots of cases. He said, you know, dozens and dozens of people on the staff. I don't know if that's what the community voted for. I don't know. We'd have to ask them right yeah, I was gonna say I don't know what the community may have expected the police accountability board would be. I don't know what the staffing is of the Civilian Review Board. I think right now, and listener will correct me if I'm wrong, right now things are still being the center for Dispute Settlement is handling cases now still, I should say. Yeah, I'm not sure of the staff of the Center for Dispute Settlement and I'm not sure everybody at the Center for Dispute Settlement works on anything that would have to do with police matters. You know, that's probably a big staff that works on lots of things to have a staff of dozens and dozens working in on one topic. Again, you know, I didn't apply for the executive director job because I don't know how to manage so I don't know what that entails. But as a city resident is a taxpayer, I thought, well, wait a minute, this is this what our community voted for? You didn't apply, Patty No, no, from our show map, see that dedicated it and I appreciate that. Outside sense of loyalty, and that's to I mean, I don't know. I guess I would have to ask go find people who'd say, did you vote in favor the PAB mean, seventy five percent of voters did. Did you? What did you think? Did you think it was going to be? I don't want it to be a bureaucracy. Yeah, so what I heard, and I also heard again this is this is me, not patty singer, representing minority reporter, but patty singer is a city taxpayer, to city resident. Does everything have to come down to money? Is it always about money? And people are probably snickering on sunch your naive, maybe I am, but is everything always about money, and is that sort of the third thing out of somebody's mouth is the money? So so this is the question I guess I would ask, because you brought up a very good point. I guess number one, the one thing that we have to think about is how many cases do we expect the Accountability Board to oversee or have to take a look at and put their time and efforts into? And I think that would probably kind of answer how much funding would be needed or how many people need to be working on said case. So again you're right, I have no idea how all this stuff works because again, I also didn't run for this, because I have no idea how are, what the expectations of the money is going to be used for or how it's going to be directed to. But my thought process has maybe start off with a set amount and just see if that is going to cover because right...

...now, obviously the circumstances are particularly die right now because of everything that's been happening but ongoing. In the future we may not have, you know, cases like this. I'll hopefully we don't have as many cases like this going forward. You know, no, obviously don't know what the with the figures of all. I think you're talking about Daniel and we don't know that the prude family will bring first case. Well, the PAP there. There are enough to me. There are numerous investigations into who knew what about Daniel prude. And Yeah, when they I don't know that it would be having. People would say, oh well, you're suppressing this, but I don't know if it makes fiscal sense to have another investigation because in in one of the headlines of this week is that, you know, count wants to do this again. The council already has one investigation going. This other investigation would be this, this what what the mayor said would be, this deep dive into Regis Police Department policies. Well, first of all, that's what the PAB is supposed to be doing. Yes, and they said and they they were upset about that. The whole law from it was yet in the first time. So already are we running counter to what the PA be supposed to doing? And I'm asking that as a as as not as a rhetorical question. Know it's great question. No, are we starting to run counter to what they're doing and are they rightfully feeling undercut here? I don't know, I don't really answer to that question. But so this the rumor hail would be paid a flat fee of two hundred fiftyzero dollars. Now that is not taxpayer money. That comes from what they call federal for for that federal forfeiture funds, which is collected from, you know, drug dealers at all kinds of stuff, money that ends up being forfeited for whatever reason. So that's not coming out of yours and well, not your pocket Room Jack the city, but it's not. It's not coming out of taxpayers pockets, but there's also a hundred thousand dollars being paid to the Chelly em refirm. That maybe coming out of taxpayer pockets. I believe that is. Again, someone will correct me if I am I am wrong on that and so I apologize for that. But that was never said that that was coming out of forfeiture funds. It was very clear that the two hundred and fifty thousand dollars would be coming out of fortuit morfiture for so I guess I wonder how many investigations do we need before people start bumping into each other and going into an investigation trying to find a foregone conclusion? I don't know that, but I think the more, the more time we we need to know what went wrong. We also need to know what we need to do better. So yes, we have to look back, but if anybody who's driven, if you looking back in your rearview mirror from too long, you're going to hit the car in front of you. No, I agree with that and I also agree you don't want two or three year eight different designations over one thing happening at the same time. And I guess that's what we also have to kind of kind of figure out is we got to make sure we are assigning the correct or appropriate people to investigate things. We can't have a law firm and a common billity aboard doing this and investigating the same thing. We should just have one person or group of people looking at these things. And you're right, you don't want to. You don't want to or you don't want to over do overkill on stuff because your people are mighty fine conflicting things and you may end up getting nowhere because no one's no one's on the same page and you want everyone kind of be in the same direction, looking at the same things and trying to figure out the conclusions. And you and the goal is the whole goal, and you said it perfectly, is to not have things like this continuously...

...have to happen again in the future. But it still goes back to the question I was asking as far as the money situation. What I just wink at your opinion should that? Should there be like maybe a set amount to start out with, like okay, we're going to make sure that we have this about of moneys out aside for this year and then we'll see if that was enough or if it was too much or if it was or if if we need more, and then we can re assess it, you know, at the end of the year for the next year, instead of just trying to put a ton of money into it and you know and see what you have. Right. So he mentioned the four Hundredzero MM. So again, you know, it's theirs. It's the first days, the first news coming right, all right, right, questions, but we're who is going to do the accounting for the police account of the week for right, accountability is its middle name. So I would think that the taxpayers would want the board to be accountable for how it is spending month. Some of this, to Matt, goes back to it. I was thinking about this this morning. Is like, what is it kind of voting? What is what is justice? And I'm I'm stuck on the on my perception that the word justice is being used these days as a synonym for revenge, and that worries me because justice isn't. In my sense, justice isn't revenge. We've talked about this before. I can I get here the eye rolls of people here. She get you down. My definition of justice is wanting for others. The rights that you claim for yourself. So if the right I claim for myself just to walk down the street and not be bothered by police because I'm just walking down the street, I want that for other people. So to to write that scale because other people walking down the street may have been harassed by police, do I get revenge for that? No, I got to find a way to make it so just walking down the street doesn't bring, you know, the wrath upon you. Right, right, I don't want I don't know. I you know, allowed to it. I don't know how to do that. That's what I want this community, in this table that we hear about, to be deciding that. How will we, how will we affording rights to others that we claim for ourselves? All be doing that? Right? Does that, after cost ext millions of dollars? I don't know that. But to to put people have to get paid. We're capital society. People got to get paid. I understand that, but I guess I was a little concerned, or as a taxpayer, that this was the this is kind of what I heard right out of the gate that with proper funding, we can fulfill we can fulfill, you know, fulfill this vision. I mean he did acknowledge that the cities in financial straits. I don't know. I think the money has to be as much of a discussion as the social justice part of it right now, and you're right that the again, I think you and you and I have said this, I think numerous times, and we certainly do agree, that the focus of all this in my opinion, and this is my opinion, I believe your opinion is similar, is to secure the future, to make sure there is so make sure in the future, if something was a problem, we eliminate that so or we try to elimit it that so it's not a problem in the future. It's going to be it's going to be hard to go back and try to find each individuals in it where this happened and try to punish everyone for every time it happened. And that's not what we that I don't think that that's what...

...we should be focused on either. I think we should be focusing on okay, we acknowledge it was a problem, let's try it. Let's try it to get rid of this problem so no one else has to go through the problem again. At the same time, I also understand this is the accountability board. So when, if and when there is a problem, people have to be held accountable for it as well. So I certainly get. I certainly get both sides. And when you when you investigate to try to hold somebody accountable, you're going to, like you said, this is a capitalistic society. People who are doing those investigations and stuff will need to be conversated for the time that they're spending working almost cases. So it you're right, the money does not to be looked at. Is certainly going to be an important part of of making this successful, I believe right, and that has to be again. The Police Accountability Board has to be accountable for its spending. Right, I agree what you were talk when you were talking, it made me think of restorative justice. We hear a lot about that. I think that's this school district has is working toward that. We hear about that just in general. You know what is restorative justice? Looking up restorative justice dot org. Repairs the Huh, excuse me, repairs the harm cause caused by crime when victims offend is and community members met to decide how to do that. Results can be transformational. It emphasizes accountability, making amends. So can we take that sense of restorative justice, can we overlay that over what we say justice for Daniel, proved, justice for prepaid, justice for anybody? Can we lay over this restorative justice, which doesn't seem as I'm as I'm skimming this, as you watch me Skim this, I'm not seeing revenge and and and punishment. How did it when when victims offends and community members, it's restoring it repairs. The word repair, not punish, right, you know, I we need to think about that and do we need to overlay that on all the things that we're looking at now, not just when, you know, two kids in school have it out right and and or somebody goes in and it, you know they shoplift or something like that. What if we looked at what if we looked at a restorative justice? What if that that was our lens for everything? Right, you know, with me, and I think we brought this up with the with the mayor, and the move on to the hallowing stuff in just a bit, but we when I look at justice also, one word always sticks out in my head. It's intent. The intent that someone has usually plays a role on on what kind of quote unquote, punishment should go with the crime that they did if someone intent. So let's say you and I were walking on the on the street and I tripped over a rock and fell and kind of bumped into you and and in dinges doing so, you fall over and you fall on the ground and you you saw for an injury. I did not intentionally hurt you. I did hurt because it was me that knocked into you. That cause you to be injured. But I don't believe in that aspect I should be penalized, or were not that. Let's not say penalize, but I should be punished for causing you that injury because that was there was no intent there. However, if I shoved you, if I was walking, I was just in a bad mood and you were next me and I shoved you to the ground and that cause you injury, then there should be a penalty for that. So intent is always the most important factor to me when you're when you're ruling Justice out towards someone. That's why people spend time in jail at you know, if you if you get into a car accident and someone...

...dies because of that and it was an accident, you're probably going to go to jail. But if you were drunk and you it's a Dwi, you killed somebody, you know, you intentionally got behind a wheel knowing that you were intoxicated. So there's a different outcome there. And that's kind of how I think about justice in my that's just how I view it. Right, you know, it depends. Why wasn't there as was a psychologist or psychiatrist and said no, I know it was Freud that said there are no accidents. But Fraser Crane right, there are no but but there are. You write. The intention, intent is a is a big thing in this. I mean if if you have a fender vendor at a stop like, what was my intent and tent was it to run into you? It just my foot slipped off the break right, whatever. But yes, people rush to judgment and rush to punish and rush to make themselves whole. I think if you look at restorative justice, there can be a way you can still make yourself whole without having your you know, without having the other person's aut all insurance triple right. Right, again, complex topic. We are going to be revisiting this absolutely. Yeah, yeah, we're certainly not. Yeah, as you no more and you know we kind of like to hear from you on this. It said then email. We can read it next week. So let me listen about this. You obviously have people are listeners. Obviously have thoughts on this too, and and you know, share them with us through your emails. Ye, Nope, and parbricus group point. I would definitely, I'm sure pattie would, to love to hear about your thoughts and we can anything that you any thoughts that you have, we can bring up on the show and we'll discuss it again. If you want US sense of the minority or you can do that. It's editor at minority report DOTNET. Don't look at it for you. Or if you want to send it directly to us here and inside the margins, you can send it to inside margins at gmailcom. That's inside margins at gmailcom, or directly to me, which is Matt Wilson at inside the margins RADIOCOM. Either way we'll look at it. I'll if it comes my way, I'll bring it up to patty. Becomes passuation, bring up to me. We'll discuss it on air. Your thoughts and your questions about the Police Accountability Board. All right, great, great time to segue now into Halloween that's coming up just in the matter of like a week or week and a half or so. That's that's coming up, and people are a little nervous, patty, because obviously this Halloween's not like last year. Last year you pretty much the kids put the costumes on, you went to any house you wanted to, knock on the door, ring the doorbell, got candy. Guess what, there's Covid nineteen still out there, and not only still, it's re emerging, becoming more fierce again. It's a before. Like I say, maybe three or four weeks ago it wasn't as bad. We were seeing the numbers dwindled down and now we're seeing the numbers rise and it's happening at schools and it's happening at public places. So there is a lot of concern about covid nineteen and trick or treating in Halloween. So I believe there's some guidelines that that were set forth, as far as I'll wing goes for this year right the county, Monroe County, has put out some so and guidelines for that. But so the county executive and the health commissioner are now doing weekly news conferences one o'clock on Thursdays and they, I believe, are streamed on the counties youtube and facebook pages. So for people who want to watch, they can. They can watch on their own. They they don't have access to asking questions. Again, if you have a question, you want to email me at editor at minority reporter dotnet before noon on Thursday, because I'm going to be watching those. You know. I can try to get your your question in, but you can watch this yourself. So documentoza and the first one of these last week...

...said that the numbers are up. Testing is up. So the more you test, the more you will find. It's not to say that you know. If we weren't, if we didn't test at all, they'd be the same number of cases out there. We would know about it. Very equal. Zero known cases right inflow. This all right. So in flew what flu season? At the beginning of the flu season, there's a lot of testing that goes on because the physicians in the health systems wanted know the is has flu arrived. So anybody who comes in with flu like symptoms, anybody, but a lot of people coming with fool like symptoms will get a flu test. So that flu tests are really big at the end of October, November, December, maybe a little bit in the beginning of January. So then there's a pattern. Then the health systems know who's coming in what the symptoms are. This year they're getting a sense. There is less testing. No longer. The flue season goes on because your there's an assumption being made that the person coming with these symptoms has flue. COVID symptoms are there. You know, there a little bit different. I can't smell anything, I can't taste anything. I've got, you know, the symptoms have have changed and been different from what we've expected sort of a quote unquote normal upper respiratory infection to be. So there's you need to be testing for that. My point is that in the end of flu season, or is it later, gets in flu season with fewer tests. If you look at the numbers of confirmed flu cases, they may not jump a lot, that doesn't mean people don't have flu right being tested. So the they and and the state the local health officials want to test because they want to know how much is out there and where, and where our potential hotspots and where do we need to do more on make raising awareness of testing. Obviously there's no treatment for this yet, but where do we need to maybe get the message out more about quarantining and isolation, and maybe where do we need to get the message out more about masking and physical distancing for seeing increases in in the number of cases? So testing is important. You you may not like what you find, but you know the the test has to be done to know. So, that being said, more more cases, more from more testing. There are there want to use the word cluster because that's I think cluster has sort of a definite term when we're talking about the number of cases and where there are increases in younger people. Mendoza wasn't terribly surprised by that. School activities, you know, we're getting to seize looks a few sports where we still have a lot of districts that have hybrid learning. So it's not going to be unheard of that the tend to nineteen age range going to show a few more cases than it did at the beginning of September before we went back to school. Right, right. So, that being said, Halloween, trick or treat. One of the things that Mendoza said in you quote probably not a good idea. In it was indoor haunted houses. I don't even I have not seen any signs for any. To be honest with you, I don't know if you have a yeah, there, there are. Yep, they're are. I know. I know that for a fact because my teenager asked if she could go to one and I told her no. Well, under the under. So there's a there's a flyer that the Monroe County put out.

It's on Monroe County dot go. Of Halloween dues. Don't Flyer. Don't participate in activities that involve a lot of screaming, shotting or singing within twelve feet of other individuals, especially indoors. So that would be I mean people who are running indoor hunted houses aren't happy to hear this. You know, Mendoza said. It's dark. You don't really knows who's right next to you. It's hard to keep that that buffer space. And this is probably an obvious one. Bobbing for apples is a bad why? I wonder why that would be? Is it because your mouth, your mouth was going into the water with much other people ask is yeah, unless you knows your bombing and chlorinated water, I don't fortunately, I'm allergic to apples, so this is not an activity that the other thing is, don't if, if you want to play trick or treat this if you want to, if you want to turn your lights on, have people come to your house, don't use a big bull to distribute candy. Yeah, makes sense, into each child's bag or line pieces up on the on the driveway or on a table. So you know, you don't want to have lots of lots of little grabby's in there. Stay within your household. Is that, you know, and that's a big thing. So I went back to work at a fitness facility and one of the things when we had our training to go back was to if people come in in a group, you know, ask them of you people coming together. Ask them a you part of the same household, and household has a bit of a loose definition. Yeah, because it could be friends who always work out together and it will I to say, Matt, no, just because you don't live with the FO people you come in to work out, you can't work out with them, but try to, you know, stay in the group, dance with the one who run yet you know, there you go. I think it's that's a great way to say. Here you go. You know, stay with stay with the people that you that you are with. Don't be, don't be a butterfly right and our littill be and flip from and flip from group to group. Limit you t treating to nearby neighborhoods. You know that's going to limit the time that you have to be in a car with other people. You know it's going to mean you're walking, is going to mean you're outside. Clean up a lot, watch or sanitize your hands often. I mean you people were were, you know, the grocery stores. They were coming home and washing, sanitizing the groceries and washing his you probably should want you have washed your hands all the time when he came home from the grocery store, shopping or anything. Those probably a good idea five years ago, let alone five months ago. So washing up more frequently. And the big thing about a mask is the is you may have to wear two masks. You may have to wear the nose and mouth covering and then you may have to wear the mass it makes you look like spider man, well, Black Panther, or whoever you're superhero is. You're superhero didn't. Didn't wear something underneath necessarily, but you have to do that. Makes you look like whoever you want to look like. Is it going to be protecting your nose and mouth? It's going to let you speak? I think usually have a nose hole and unful from a hundred years ago, a little plastic mask, yeah, with the holes in them, I know you're talking about. Yep, where you got to wear the proper we have to cover your nose in your mouth properly. Yep. You know what? I suggest? Everyone being Ninja's this year, because then you's always have their faces and noses covered and you can use those masks. So everyone just being Ninja. You'll be fine. I know, with what I'm doing this year, and I'm lucky and I know that everyone has this.

Can do this. Is My children go to daycare there. They go to a daycare and you know, separated classrooms for a small amount of people and they're doing a little halloween thing for the kids at the daycare where they're just going to go to each classroom and you know they're going to be supervised by multiple adults and they're going to be sanitized and watched heavily, and that makes me more comfortable about the interactions that that that they're going to have. What trick or treating soul. Instead of me letting them go out in public with a bunch of strangers getting their candy, they're going to be at the daycare where they're already at anyways, and just visiting other rooms that they're not part of, but being watched and getting candy that way, and they're in a very safe and sanitized environment. So if you have an option like that, I'm not. I'm not sure everyone does, but if you have kids that are involved in some sort of daytime daycare activity, I know a lot of them are doing that and that may be an option for you this time around. Instead of having them going house to house, you can keep them kind of in that same environment that they're kind of used to anyways. I get my I guess my question that is not being familiar with how they're they're running those. I guess bringing kids to different classrooms, is that sort of taking them out of their their classroom is their family, yes, or whatever, nine in the morning to three in the after whatever time they're there, that classroom is their family. Are you then sort of mixing families like what? That's actually a great question, and they've the way, the way that they found they got around that is. So the majority of classrooms have multiple adults that watch the kids. So each room is going to have one of those adults stayed behind and handle the candy. So a group comes in, they get the candy, that group leaves and then the next group comes in. So you're not going to have multiple groups interacting with each other. Each group still going to stay together and only interact with one adult from each room that's getting off the candy. Okay, so it's almost like it's almost like a group of kids in the neighborhood are going to Matt's House and Matt Standing there handing out the candy like Matt normally would, only it's just the teacher in the day care. Long. You got it absolutely correct. All Right, okay, okay, all I think, I think I get the picture of that, but still you still a lot of them moving around. You know, I don't know, and I'm sure they've cleared it with their health department. So who am I to play? Yeah, they have the I guess. The only reason why I feel a little bit more comfortable doing that is because they're already in that building anyways. They're already in that wing of the building where they do they do their schooling and yes, they don't normally go into those classrooms. However, they're already used to the pretty much the teachers who are involved with that. So it's a it's it's an environment that they're acclimated to there, they're used to, whereas, and again, it's differ for everybody. If, if you have kids in the neighborhood that are still accomated to seeing certain people in neighborhood, that's which it's I think would be a similar, similar experience. But if you are one of those neighborhoods where you don't really interact with your neighbors, that's opening it. That's opening him up to brand new environments, you know what I mean. So that's that is where it's a little different. Where in my situation I don't really and for fortunately, I don't see my neighbors and down my street very often. So putting my kids out there to strangers homes, it just get it just feels more comfort because I know each teacher and each classroom. I've met them, we've had we have a relationship. So it just feels more comfortable to work with people that I'm familiar with versus people that I'm not and I don't know their habits and all clean they are. You know what I mean? Right, and which is you know, what you said is interesting to me is if you don't know your neighbors, why would you send your kids? It's very good pointant. Yeah, right, and when we went we were kids, we didn't know every neighbor, but we stayed in our in probably within a three or four block radius, because those people would see us walk to and from school, they would have probably driven by when we were...

...out playing in the yards or something that so they would somehow, you know, we knew, we knew that that area. But yeah, I've always been surprised at you. You'll go to a different why would you go to strangers house? Even at the best of times, trick or treating should be done, but here I am being home. No, you're right. Even even when we did go door to door, I usually one to my mom's neighborhood. Are are my mother in laws theirorhood, because we do know the neighbors there and we're more comfortable with them. So, yeah, you're right, I'd if it's someone I don't know, I don't usually take them out there anyways. All right, we have to go to a break. So thank you so much, Patty, for everything that you've done today and, as always do, I always appreciate talking to you. Don't forget, by the way, before I lett petty go, she mentioned earlier that we're looking for your comments and your questions in regards to the police account, Goalie Board and also this for trick or treating Halloween. We want to know what you're doing, what your plans are. You know how you feel about Halloween this year. I'd certainly like to hear about it, and I'm sure Patty Wood as well. So you can send your questions or comments either to the minority reporter via editor at minority reporter Dotnet, or you can send them my way to inside the margins, at inside the mar inside margins at gmailcom or Matt Wilson at inside the margins RADIOCOM. And again, when you go to the website for the minority reporter, which is minority reporter Dotnet, you will have the option there to subscribe, and I always say you you will that. I'm not gonna say should you will be better off. You'd be better off if you help out local journalists. I almost did, but I didn't. I strongly encourage Patty. Thank you so much, as always. I appreciate it. Always, Mat appreciate you. All right, we'll be right back after this break. This is inside the margins. Welcome back to inside the margins. Okay, my final thoughts. Today is going to be about voting and I'm going to help you get to where you need to go in order to vote. You obviously can vote in November three, which is actual election day, or you can send up for early voting. No, early voting is from October twenty four, which is this Saturday, this coming Saturday. So Saturday October twenty four to Sunday November one. The dates and hours may very based on where you live. So to get your status and also you can look up where you can vote and get the Times at voter. Look up that elections dot ny dot gov. again, that's voter. Look up that elections dot ny dot gov. now, if you have voted before New York, you don't need to provide any ID or anything like that. But if you are first time voter, who registered by mail and you did not provide a copy of your ID with your registration. You may need to show ID to vote. Now. A current acceptable forms of ID, obviously as your driver's license or current and valid photo ID, or copy of a current utility bill, you know, like your your electric or heat bank statements work. Also government checks, paychecks or any other government documents that show your name and address. If you are unable to provide an ID, you will be able to vote an affidavid ballot. So if you don't have an ID, you can do the affidavid ballot vote. But if you have your idea, you can still show up and again to get the locations and Times that are best for you. Go to voter. Look up the OTER. Ok, youp that elections dot ny dot Gov. Okay, don't. There is no excuse for you not to vote. If you're afraid of the mass of lines that may be there for November three, vote early and make sure you get...

...out there between October twenty four, which is this coming Saturday, and November. onest you do that, you will avoid those really long lines and you know, I'll probably be a little sabor for you as well. If you are afraid of you know, people with the coronavirus. Will be less people doing the early vote and will be more on the actual election day. So don't have an excuse. You can do the mail event ballots to that's fine. But if you are afraid of voter fraud or all the other rumors that you've heard of, which are unfounded, by the way. But but if you are afraid of that, that's fine. Just go out there and vote. Don't let anyone give you an excuse to not go vote. Okay, all right, time for me to get out of here. We will see you next week. By the way, next week we see you, it will be early voter time, so get out there and do that. We'll talk to you next time. This is inside the margins. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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