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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode · 1 year ago

Legalization of Marijuana

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We talk weed legalization and vaccine equity 

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson, and Hello, it is Monday. That mean it's another day for inside the margins. I am Matt Wilson. got a lot to talk about today. Obviously everyone's heard in the news the new legislation that's look look it's going to pass about legalizing marijuana and also what the funding will be used for if legalization does go through, which again it looks like it's going to, and we'll talk about that. Also, vaccine equity. We're going to talk about that in you know, discussions as to why some communities are not getting vaccinated as fast as they should. Is it on purpose? Is there a reason? will get we'll dive deeper into that. But before we get into all of those topics, first let's go ahead and bring in my partner in legalization, not crime. It's the minority reporters, pretty singer. Hello, Patty, good morning to you what you say again there. What am I? Your partnering? I'm not, M I don't know. I if nominated, I will not elected, I will not serve. I think I'm gonna I think I'm gonna distance my I'm gonna like that heisman trophy stead know where. I'M gonna stiff arm that one. That is probably a smart move. Yeah, yeah, definitely. Hi everybody. I'm here on my own relition today, distancing myself from my, quote unquote, good friend Matt. All right, let's let's get right to enough of this for Volity, excuse me. A grassroots analytics, which is a nonprofit, is offering other nonprofits fundraising options. The Race Commission report is titled No More Excuses. It's time for action, and that is also their agenda for fulfilling what their mission is. The African, American and Latino health coalitions suggest ways that governor Cuomo can achieve vaccine equity. The fairport police department has started a restorative justice initiative. The judge had been considering a delay in a venue change in the George Floyd murder trial in Minneapolis and president's former former President Bill Clinton, current President Joe Biden remember talk about Vernon Jordan, saying that verd and Jordan, Vernon Jordan, was in the freedom business. In the RPD, results of an internal investigation into the death of Daniel prude are expected in April. In opinion and editorial, state Senator Sammer Brook says why she will say yes to the covid vaccine, and the Reverend Michael Vaughan and his something something to think about, says, not a protest with an exclamation point, Matt. Thank you such as so much, Patti. And, as always, you can find the full versions of those headlines that petty just talked about on the minority reporter dotnet. Just go right ahead and go to minority reporter dotnet. While you're there, you will have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter. I am a subscriber. I believe it's a great way to get information in news that's important to me, that reflects my community. So definitely take advantage of that you can. You can get the hard copy or you get the digital version. That's totally up to you. Also, if you have any questions, comments or suggestions, they are always up to receiving that. All you have to do is submit your email to editor at minority reporter Dotnetic, and that's editor at minority...

...reporter DOTNET. And, as always, you can find every episode of inside the margins on inside the margins RADIOCOM. You can also find us on I hearn'tcom and wherever you get your podcast. All right, so we come back. We are going to talk about the lead legalization of marijuana and also a story that was the the minority reporter and regards to vaccine equity. We will talk about all that when we come back. This is inside the March has welcome back to you inside the margins. I'm here with Patty. All right, Patty, let's go ahead and dive right into this. So, as many people have heard by now, there's a bill to legalize marijuana. It was announced on Saturday and it looks like it's going to pass now. It could pass as earlier today, probably by Tuesday, but it could pass even today. But it looks like it has. It has a support in the backing for it to pass and they're lively. Warren Patty has been talking about using the funding that you can funding from the legalization of marijuana as reparations and using it to help out the communities that were most affected by the drug epidemic. Just want to talk about that and get some get some of your thoughts on that whole procedure and the end of legalization of marijuana in general. Well, I used to be for it and to quote groutio marks, to hopefully some of our listeners will know. You know, whatever commenced it, I'm against it. I'm against smokable forms of it, to be honest with you. Same Way, I think it should follow the medical marijuana which in New York state, Medica for medical marijuana that smokable for warms are not allowed. And I say that because every morning I go for a walk in my neighborhood and every morning I pass my covid test because I have no sudden loss of smell. Are you good? So I'm walking crossing streets and people were driving by me and I'm smelling weed. So that's coming from those vehicles. HMM. Yes, people drive intoxicated, they drive with alcohol, you know, in their system, but there are ways in which that can be tested. To my knowledge, there isn't a way that you can you can test an impair driver for marijuana. Now, some people might argue, well, if you do that, then you're back to the war on drugs and you're doing the same thing that got us here by over policing, for for marijuana and over policing certain neighborhoods. I don't know. I mean, I don't want to get into a traffic accident with somebody who's on, who's using alcohol. I don't want to get in a traffic accident with somebody who's use marijuana. Would it be the same effect if somebody you know, aid a Brownie for breakfast and then got behind the wheel? I don't know. I just think that that issue of how you're going to detect the level and people who were who are driving and smoking our are they ability impaired? How you going to, let's say, enforce that, for lack of a better word, but that concerns me. That's one issue that the concern is that people were driving while high. We don't like it with alcohol. We have laws against it with alcohol or we not going to have those laws from marijuana? Second issue is how will the money be used in communities which were over policed in the war on drugs and negatively affected by that over policing? The mayor wants to use some of that money for to start programs of universal basic income and homeownership,...

...noble, noble pursuits. She sent a letter out to community based organizations, into some nonprofits, late last week, I believe it was staying that she wanted to she wanted them on a committee that was going to, you know, start in April to look into what that was going to look like. Well, from what I could could fathom and having a few conversations with people, the letter caught a few people by surprise. They didn't know this was coming or they didn't know that this was the form in which it was coming. Right. So they they caught caught short on this figuring out, okay, what is going to be happening? What is this committee? There didn't seem to be a deadline on it. What are we looking at? One of the things I saw on that letter was they didn't, at least the news release that came out with the letter, did not have organization such as Consumer Credit Counseling Service from Rochester, which has programs for homeownership. So there are some existing programs in the community to help people get become homeowners. If that is what they at, that is what they choose to do so. I didn't see that and that my concern with this is, as can happen in this community, people like to run around and then run into each other. Yeah, that doesn't because there are things are already what's already happening. It's my experience in this community that people love to take credit and not necessarily that concerned about getting something done. But who got credit for it? I see this is a put this committee, this, this the way. This approach is potentially running into that. Hoping it's not. Now the other issue is how much? How much financing is the state going to release? So much? How much revenue is the state going to release from marijuana? Because one of the reasons it didn't pass, what two or three years ago, is we hadn't just come off of Covid in the state wasn't broke. Yeah, right, and everybody wasn't arguing which raised taxes on the rich and the governor saying you really doesn't want to do that. So we need another revenue stream. Oh, let's let's put another syntax, as they call them, out there. If it helped me out here, Matt, okay, because above my pay grade's absolutely right. So listeners. Well work in my way through this. If you're going to use tax revenue for either for reparations or to establish to help out communities have been overpoliced in the war on drugs, you're going to have to tax this product at a very high rate if you want to help out those communities. Would those communities be buying the product and would they be able to afford the high price of the product to then go back and help their community? I haven't seen a price list right for any of this. There's no menu yet with you know when you go to a restaurant right to put the menu in the window you can see if you like the food and you like the price or you walk to the next one. I haven't seen any of that. It's not to say it's not going to come out soon, because this is going to be part of the budget. Budget is supposed to be passed by April first. That's the end of the week. So yeah, this is going to happen pretty quickly. But I've got some question that. I am not against the concept of reparations, not against the concept of a universal basic income. I am all for Home Ownership. I live in the city. I would love to see more, more homeowners in the city. I think that is what the city needs, not not a lot of rentals. We need more homeownership. So none of that. I'm I'm against. I am against exploiting communities that have already been exploited for money that is supposed to go to help this community. That is my concern. Now you can rescue that. I just my footword. No,...

...no, no, rescue me on this, Matt. All right, so you put down a lot of information, and so here's where I'm at, Patti. I'm teetering and I hate I don't like a tter. I like to be definitive, but I'm teetering and I will explain because I agree with a lot of the point that you made. Also, the reason why I'm teetering is I look at this two ways. Want to look at it similar to alcohol, right, if you recall when prohibition happened, crime within out with alcohol, Alcopol and the drug that the that the drug dealers, but the alcohol kingpins of that time random up with gangster, the gangster and era. Once prohibition ended, a lot of that violence and crime kind of went down. I put marijuana almost on the same level of alcohol, because people called marijuana the gateway drug, but I think I'lcohol really is the gateway drug. I think your in additions are lowered once you have consumed alcohol and you're more willing to try and experience with other things because of alcohol. All I don't I wouldn't call necessarily marijuana, I think. I think I'll caohol. Is The reason why you've tried being a Wana sometimes. So that's kind of why I'm there. I think if you're going to have alcohol, I don't I will. I'm not going to be honest with you. I don't smoke. I'm not a smoker. I'm not really a fan of marijuana. I'm just talking simply about the legal revovocations of what happens when you are caught with marijuana and all that stuff. So on that note, they're in comparison with alcohol. I think it should have the same kind of legal legalization as alcohol does. I kind of put it on the same wave length there. Now to get to your point about exploiting communities. I do agree with you on that because I do think let's look at cigarettes. Cigarette smoke has been cigarette smoking has been on the on the decline for a while now. Right it's quite as finging down it's down. We're trying to allout a lot less people smoke now than fifteen, twenty years ago. However, smoking is still really high and minority communities and pork communities cigarette use is still higher there than anywhere else. In those communities cigarettes are it's been proven that cigarets will kill you. You will get, you can get one cancer and all types of other things with cigarettes. They're not illegal, but they are still use and they are still killing our people and in every single corner store or sells the cigarettes and and and my owas are still buying them at a higher rate than anywhere else. Sure, cigarettes are taxed high, which is where, when you're talking about the marijuana be in tax, I kind of would see it probably like cigarettes because if you, if you remember back in the s and S, a pack of cigarettes costs like three or four bucks. We're now a pack of sigerts across you like ten fifteen dollars, because most of the most of the revenue for a pack of cigarettes is is is taxable. However, people, poverty stricken people, are still spending their hard earned money or the money that they don't have to buy cigarettes that are ten dollars a pack and if you're spoken a pack a day, you're looking at fifty, sixty dollars or whatever every week, even more than if you out Saturday and Sunday. Right you, you're nearing almost a hundred bucks a week to smoke cigarettes. And I that's my fear is, if you're doing that to marijuana and people are doing the same thing, is that where all their money is going to go to that? So that's why I'm teetering pretty because you make a great point about exploiting impoverished neighborhoods and powerishy and impoverished neighborhoods. Alcohol use, tobacco use, drug use is always higher than in the reportedly higher than in the other nicer suburban areas, which I'm sure there's obviously that's going on there...

...too. But if you look at the reports of the numbers always show a higher use in the and the and the poverty stricken areas. So that's where I teeter. I see why I see another on one hand where if you legalizing marijuana kind of be criminalizes it and all of a sudden you may not be going to the guy on the street who sells that? You should might just go to the store. So so you can see crime kind of take a die because of that. At the same time, though, you are now placing little dispensaries next to the liquor stores, a little corner stores. So you're still you're saturating those poor environments with drugs and alcohol, which is also what we're trying not to do. Right, and you still can't buy ahead of brockway right, right, and and a decent looking head of lettuce in the city. So the dispensary. So will will people who have not had jobs? Will they be trained in the business of running a dispensary? To you know, I'm going to run a marijuana dispensary in my nineteen ward or my you know, Corn Hill, or my do we avenue neighborhood, and I don't know what's what's what? What's the moral ethical of this? Is I'm going to and I'm going to be charging my neighbor all this money that I know this person can't afford for another addictive substance. And and and you're not. I really don't think you're going to completely do away with the black market, because if you again, I don't know how these are going to be packaged. Let's set okay, for the sake of argument, you're going to get a state sponsored container. Amount of marijuana for ten hours. Are you're going to buy certain I don't know. I'm bad in the metric system. What's a Graham? All right, let's just that. Maybe too much, it maybe, but it's just, it's just, sir. Okay, that's fine. We say a Graham for twenty dollars or just making this up just because we need some numbers. It's going to be the advantage of this is you're going to know what's in. This is going to be hopefully produced to a stay. All right, so each each each each purchase you make will be the same. You'll be buying the same product, unlike on the street where there is fentinel in everything. Maybe an exaggeration, but fentinel was in an awful lot of stuff. True, if you're speaking the truth. So so I'm going to go, but I maybe can't afford, regardless of my race, I just may not be able to afford the state version of the weed. But I still know the man or woman I was buying from is going to absolve going to be. I still think there's going to be a black market for this. and Are you saying that that a lot of the crime and the shootings, just the shootings and the murders that we have seen in Rochester in the past several months, are those drug related? Because I don't believe I've heard our PD say that. And when you ask ourpd are these gang related, they start hemming and hauing a little bit and they start using euphemisms for the word gang. Yeah, so I don't know. Will will the violence be replaced? Because now, if, if we're seeing this violence that is drug related, is it going to be replaced by something else? We've got bigger problems here, people, and I think we're papering over them. Will put attended with with with with the marijuana issues and and I think we're using that. I'll give you another bad one, smoke screen. I think we're diverting ourselves from from issues. Issues like what do...

...we do? Do we do reparations, or do we do universal basic income? Do we get homeownership? How do we get equity and our institutions? What has the race commission said that we can put it really into effect? Let's do let's not do the hard work. Let's legalize marijuana because it's state needs a tax money. Let's put us up dispensaries and let the chips fall where they make. Yeah, I know. That's that's why take on. I'm not a teetotaler. I went to college. Go do with that what you want, a long time ago. But you've heard why I why I'm against US smoking and driving, exploiting the communities, a diversion from some of the things that we really need to fix. And what are we going to do next when we need tax money? Will we will we BE NEVADA? Will we legalize prostitution because we need the tax money? Yeah, we've got to have other ways. We've got to have other ways of raising money for the things that we need as a community of society and we want other than Syn taxes. Yeah, no, I again. That's why I hate they can say again. That's why a teeter, because the point that you make are extremely valid. The only reason why, and you and you are right, black barket's not going to go away. I will be completely honest with you. It's not. However, what I guess, what I would hope, what I would hope is they're still black market cigarettes. But it's not, it's not. It's almost no one even thinks about that really because you because if you're really heart for Sickos, you can just go to your local convenience store and some grocery stores. It's but it's there. Still as going to be Black Parken and people aren't going to be able to be to afford the the higher end. State. You know the state given marijuana, because I remembered Colorado's one of the first places where they legalized marijuana and there's still people on the streets who still sell marijuana and in Calorado, even when the first was legalize it, it didn't didn't change that aspect. But I do think, I think there will be it again. This is opinion. I think there will be less crime associated with it. However, I do think I don't know how it's going to impact communities. So that's why I kind of I teeter, because I think it's still I think it may, just like liquor stores in the communities on every corner hurt the community. I think have a marijuana dispensaries and every corner may hurt the community as well. However, I also can see possibly less crime because of the legalization marijuana, but you're right, that may just that just may emphasize crime on other drugs. So so who knows? I don't know, and I will also to end on this topic before we go to our break. You make another great point, is the only reason why this even a conversation is because of covid and it is because of the fact that we are so much in the whole on we need money so badly that we're looking at we're grasping at whatever we can to get money. And because this was a thought back in the day, now it's going to it's going to pass easily because of the because of the situation that we're in. So maybe we should do this, but we should maybe think about the best way to do it, and I don't know if we have yet, and that's I guess that's where I kind of stand and I would like to see, once the law is passed, are there, I mean, the genies out of the bottle to tast out of the two whatever, you're not going to put it back in there. So you're not going to. You know, I'm going to make marijuana illegal again. Once you legal outs, there you're right, but are there some provisions that you can work on the wall? You can change some things, you can see what's what's happening with with this and where's the revenue going? I mean I think of the tobacco settlement from what the s that went into. Most state, most many states use that in their general funds. They did not use it to help people smokers. Right. Health Hause, a lottery working to help out schools. How's that one working out? So so that that's my...

...concern on this that if you want to do this and you have increase in addiction or you need addiction Serviss, look at what are we talking about in this community? What's the conversation in this community right now? Mental Health Response. Yeah, so how will we working that in to this? Because it just like, you know, some people have their glass of wine with dinner every night and their one less of wine with dinner and they go on their day and there's no issue. Some people use a substance to help them get through culpe right the day, not not as just something to have because it makes the steak taste better. Right. So how will we going to address mental health potential, mental health ramifications from this. Yeah, look it. If this works out beautifully, let's come back and say, you know, Patty had it completely wrong and I'll say, you know what, this is working out great. I don't smell and all my walks anymore in the morning. I think now I have covid because I can't smell. I'm not. I don't smell weed anyone. I don't get my test anymore of the morning. I go for a walk. Great, it's working out. In neighborhoods, yes, we have created business people. It's working wonderfully. I'll say that. Okay, fair enough. Right now I have my doubts. Then if that's fair enough, that's fair enough. All right. Obviously there's going to be more to come. We'll keep our eyes on this. I'm sure it'll be passing any time now. So we'll keep our eyes and ears peeled as to when thats okay, Patty, when we come back we are going to talk about what you had actually in the minor reporter, and that is vaccine equity. I believe that the actual story was the coalition's had some suggestions on how we can achieve vaccine equity. We'll talk about that and also maybe reasons why some communities are hesitant to get vaccited. We'll right back. This is inside the margins. Welcome back to inside the margins. Okay, so petty. This next topic to me is, I think, one of the more important ones when it comes to our day and age and how we're all trying to survive covid and that's vaccine equity. Now in the mental reporter there's a story that it's a great story there that you guys did and it was entitled African, American, Latino Health coalition suggest ways Como can achieve vaccine equity, and if you want to see that full story, make sure you go to mightor report DOTNET and also, if you subscribe, you can download it and Readin fall. So that's been something that we talked about before and the suggests on how we could do that. So I had some thoughts on this as to why there is some hasn't. Some people are hasn't. To get back to the but before I get into that, why when I have you briefly talked about this story before I get into all that? Right, so, people are not familiar common ground health, which is the the regional health planning agency for the for the finger lakes counties. They convene to coalitions, the African American Health Coalition, in the Latino Health Coalition. They meet separately and they also work together. They sent a letter to Governor Culmo march eighteen. That was it was dated. It was it was a joint, joint effort and they had basically four priorities, not in any particular order. So the priorities were to allow flexibility and local decisionmaking in vaccine registration and distribution. They wanted to prioritize farm laborers. In the one D group, as you may recall before, just about everybody now with as to eligible for everybody can be out. Now. Everybody's eligible, but the eligibility has increased but supply is still trying to catch up with right vic way, they had this essential work. It is one a, D, One c. They wanted farm workers. This group wants farm workers because that's a big part of our area.

Absolutely as farm workers to be in the one B group they wanted to they want to mandate language access for people with limited English proficiency. That's you know, if you try to sign up for this and everything is in English, that is going to be that can be a real bad. Yeah, yeah, but to you. And they also wanted timely and meaningful data for informed local decisionmaking. Well, so I've been on that one. Okay, I'm going to hurt my arm break patting myself in the back. I've been on that for a year. I can remember one of the earliest news conferences, just when covid was just here, and I said to County Health Commissioner Documentoza, are you collecting data on but by race and ethnicity so we know who this is affecting. This was a year ago. Now the forms don't have that what so they've been playing catchup on on that information for a year. The state, I think it was only in mid to late February, on its code covid tracker, Covid Vaccine Tracker website, started putting racial and ethnic data on the website. Before you had to call the Department of Health. You had a way, maybe you got something, maybe you didn't. And so it's interesting in as of March, twenty one African Americans made up eight point three percent of people in Monroe County who would received at least one dose. A week later they're eight point two percent, according to data on the vaccine tracker, Hispanic or Latino were five point two percent. A week later their five point three percent. So this, you know, let's trot out all the cliches, moving the needle. This needles not going anywhere. That movie at all. Yeah, and so back to back to you man on why that might be all right. So, yeah, it's so I talked. I talked to a lot of circles in regards to who wants to get now this is not hard data that I'm going to talk about. This is more of the hear saying that I have, you know, on the circles of that I've talked to you and in the groups that are not minority, because some of the jobs I do are, there's a lot of people who are not minority, every single person, maybe one or two. Maybe one or two don't want to, but everybody else is like I either have got my first shot, I have our I'mory scheduled to get it. When it's open to me, I'm going to get it, or I've gotten both shots already. So everyone is on board to get the vaccine. When I talk to the minority communities that I talked to, Black Latino, a lot of them don't want the vaccine. A lot of them are fearful of the vaccine. A lot of them believe that the government's hiding something in regards to the vaccine. A lot of people think that people are dying because of the vaccine or they're getting these government trackers are being put into your body so they can figure out where you're at. It all times, a lot of fearfulness of the government. On the my on minority people who are minorities. They have these thoughts. Now, I like get it. Obviously, in some instances the government has not always been so kind to minorities and ethnic groups. There's been out. There's a bit of tainted history right. So I understand why there are people who are maybe you're not as trusting of the government as others would be. But I'm a person who, and this is me, and I know you are very much like this too, I'm a numbers I'm a science guy. I look at data. That's kind of how I make my decisions, not just on conspiracy theories and and and the government boogeyman that's...

...out to get me. And if you look at the numbers, even now, even though Covid I think the numbers are going back up a little bit. But nationally thousands of people, or at least at least a thousand people, on a daily basis, almost every day, reported die from covid. Daddy, almost every day at least a thousand deaths are reported in the nation from covid. As far as people dying from vaccinations, so far none, no death has actually been tied to the vaccination. Now people there's thoughts that people who have been vaccinated and there mate, there's a chance that that I could have something to do with that, but there's been no evidence to support that the vaccine was the cause of death. So on a daily basis, patty, a thousand, least a thousand people died from covid and on a daily basis there are literally almost no reports of people dying for being vaccinated. But people are, people think that people are dying from this untested vaccine. Now, look, I know I've I recently talked to Patty. I know you've known I haven't talked about this a lot, but I'm actually recovering from covid. I had it not not that long ago. I just recently came out of isolation and I'll tell you something. It's not fun. It is not fun. It is unlike anything I've ever had before. I've never experienced anything that like covid before. There was not like a like the common cold, as people some people say. It's a lot deeper than that and if you hear it my voice, I'm still not fully recovered. I don't think if you have a chance to not have it, I think you should do whatever you can to not have this effect you or your family members. It's a horrible thing. I have I have had one friend pass away from it. I've had another friend almost pass away from it. He was in the icee you on a ventilator, almost done. He somehow was able to get himself back and when I heard that I got on like I don't I have no idea how it's going to affect me. I don't know if I'm going to be one of the really serious cases, the really like cases or somewhere in between. Luckily for me, I had some issues. I had the loss of scent, loss of smell, very bad headaches like a Sun burnal over my body, a lot of egges and paints, staggering headaches, congestion. I couldn't stop coughing for a while, some some difficulties breathing, but I know I didn't have to go to hospital. I was able to recover at home and I'm lucky. So I don't understand why you would want to risk getting that when the numbers show you that a lot of people have gotten this and a lot of people die from it, and there's almost no numbers showing anything that the vaccines are doing anything near what covid doing to people. I read a line in an article. It was about something other than this, but it is appropriate to to say the heart has reasons that reason can't explain. It was written in a sense of relationships and you know why you were attracted to certain people and things like that. But as you're saying that the heart has reasons that reason can't explain, it is is. It is UN unexplainable, inexplicable to those of us who support science and who support a vaccine, knowing the risks of vaccines right why somebody would not want a vaccine for anything from measles, agree for it, for it for all, for flu shot every year. But there's an emotional component to this that I think those of us who can't wait to get a vaccine discount on other people and I think we discount it. I think that's a it's a it's not a...

...privileged thing. It's I think it's just it's just in an arrogance or not wanting to understand why somebody, why their heart, has a reason that that a reason can't explain, because they probably would know. If you, if you could sit and have a conversation, they might say, I know that, I know that, I know that, I got it. Yeah, right, numbers, thousand, thousand two, none, right, that's a real route, right as a thousand zero. Yeah, that's that's a real that's that's a route. I get it. No, I'm not going to do it. And how do you chip away at that? Now there is one of the stories that I want to be working on in the next couple weeks is there's a speakers bureau in town where they're going to be individuals going to be going out to to people who may be hesitant, reluctant, whatever word you want to use, and talk to them and and that's a question that I may want to ask them. Okay, so when you've gone out a couple times, what is that? What is what reason does the heart have that that the head can't explain? You know, tell me what. Tell me what some of the things you're hearing people have now. Often you will hear covids, not the flu. Often you will hear well, I got my flu shot and I got the flu. Well, it can take up to two weeks to get full immunization, so you could have been exposed in that period of time. The flu shots not perfect. I was in the Astra Zenica Trial and they have said that the and there's been some some issues with the data from astersenic. Are they really something? And then they release some more updated that it is seventy five, seventy nine percent effective against one of them, mill covid. There is no such thing, but against contracting the illness, hundred percent effective against serious illness and hospitalization. So you know, might I contract covid even having had the vaccine? Is Part of the trial. It's possible I might. I look at that as I get the flu shot every year. I figure if I get the flu, because there's no guarantees in life, I may be sick for two or three days, not a week. Right, if I am unlucky enough to contract covid after having a vaccine. Maybe I'm sick for two or three days, Yep, and I'm not going to end. I'm very rarely unlikely that I'm going to be hospitalized. Right, good, great time, play in the odds. Also with the right, with the flu, Patti, right, isn't it like? Some years has been like forty five percent. Of fact have some years it's been like the flu is the best guess, because what they do is they take what has happened in the Southern Hemisphere for the northern hemisphere and figure out what the strains are and they do the they do the best they can here. Before covid do these vaccines came out before they were covid variance. So this is these vaccines are against what the first round of covid that went through the world. In a sense, are they effective against the variance? I'm not a scientist. They could be. That could be like the flu vaccine and a second you have a variant. It could be like three quarters of active against that, again minimizing your risk of illness and further minimizing your risk of serious disease. Right, it's right. It's so. It's how about how about this theory. I'm sure you'll agree with it. If you wear a seat belt in your car and you get into a car accident, you could still get hurt or even be an it's still be a fatal accident, even if you wear your seat belt. However, wearing that seat belt can limit the amount of damage that's done on you when you're in a car accident. So it would just be wiser to wear one than not,...

...even though you still it's still may end up bad for either way. But that seat belt could save your life. Right, and you could get burned by the air bag deploying its right, but the air bag also can. Yeah, I mean, look at mad everything, everything is a risk and there's relative risk. I'm not a statistician. I can't define necessarily what that is for you and give you a percentage. But you're you're playing, you're playing the odds and you're trying to stack a deck in your favor. Right, right, and your and you make a valid point. I I've some arguments that I've heard. I'm like, I don't understand your argument, but there are others who just won't divulge why they're hesitant to get the vaccine and you're right, you don't. It's something in them that just tells them don't do it, because I don't trust something some of the arguments I've heard. I'm like, you know, okay, if that's what you really believe, I get it, but the numbers don't show that. That's probably true. But you're right, there's no way I can force I don't want to force anybody. I want. I'm always, I've always been a person I'm a proponent of freedom of choice, for you to choose how you want to live your life. I don't want to have anything mandated on you, but I just want to make sure everyone has the facts are. You know what I mean. I just want to make sure if that's the reason why that you're not getting the vaccines because you don't have that information in front of you, go to the CDC's website. Look at the numbers, look at look at look at just google how many deaths that have happened because of the vaccine. Look it up. So look at how many people have been vaccinated versus deaths caused by the vaccine, and then look at people have add covid and who have died from the car from covid and there is a huge difference and that number right. Again, there's not really been any proven deaths from the vaccine yet. So even theoretical or possible deaths from the vaccine are are still extremely mental and comparison to getting covid and dying from covid. So just have that information handy and make sure that you are up to date on the facts and that way you can make an informed decision. Now, if you have the facts and your decision still is to not, you know, that's that's your right. Cannot but make sure that you make an educate decision, not just a decision based on hearsay. And that's the point that I think these speaker's bureau, that's the point that a lot of folks from make from these coalitions, have said when they when they have tried to reach individuals, is that make the decision you want to make, but make it based on facts, not on not on fears. Right now, with pep, not not with not what you're front on the street. So you know, I heard that they put, you know, Nana, Nano whatever in your blood so they can track you, whether you know these are not proven things, that these are. You know, I could they be doing that. Hey, who knows, they could be doing anything, but I sincerely doubt that that's happening. I just want to just want to put that out there. But covid a serious thing. Like I said, I'm still I'm still recovering from it. My stepdaughter had it. We're trying to trying to keep our family not getting it as much as possible and I don't want anyone else to go through that. It's not it's not ideal from anyone to put themselves in a position to have those symptoms and be stuck in the house and not be able to go anywhere because you are isolated with a terrible, terrible virus. So just just stay informed and don't let people take you down the wrong road if you're thinking about get that getting this also, I think you made a point. I know that a lot of a lot more vacancies and vaccinations are available now right it's not as bad as it was before. I know it was...

...really, really tough to schedule a vaccination if you didn't qualify, but now, if you qualify, it's relatively easy to get vaccinated. There's still shortages in places. There's still more demand than there is supply their county. Every week we hear, you know, how many doses they get in and how they apportionate like that. So it's still there's still our challenges for for vaccine, the the Hawkeye plant I have I have not seen the update of how much how long that is going to run for up on St Paul. Not a hundred percent sure. I needed something. I need to check on or they'll be sending something out with that. See. So they're still trying to do as much as they can to get as much vaccine out to people who want as possible. Okay, all right, just something to think about there. All right, Patty, we're coming to the end of the show. Just before we go, I want to make sure that I remind everyone to get the full versions of the stories that petty talked about earlier today during the headlines, and also the story that we just talked about, the equity, the vaccine equisity equity. That's also available on the minority for as website, minority reporter dotnet. Again, you can subscribe while you're there as well to get the digital or the hard copy so you can read that and all the other headlines that Patty talked about earlier. Again, if you have any comments or questions or suggestions, you can submit that to editor at minority report. That again. That's editor at minority reporter dot that. I will certainly look into your thoughts. If you're just tuning in now, unfortunately you have missed the show, but that's okay. You can find our show on inside the margins, radiocom. All past episodes are there, including this one. You can also go to iheartcom, spotify, wherever you get your podcasts. Were there? All right, Patty. How about we do this again next week? I think about that. Was that introduction? I know that was. That was terrible. Yeah, I don't know, and I about that. Might people call your people and then aciate this? So you know, Patt I ca. I can't hear all the part. I can't hear you can't that one. That one I felt the breeze for. Patty. Singer, I am Matt Wilson. This is inside the margins. Will Sing you next week. See Yea. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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