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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 16 · 2 years ago

Keeping your sanity while sheltering in place

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of Inside The Margins Patti Singer Delivers the headline news, we continue our discussion on ways to keep yourself mentally healthy during social distancing, and we play a clip from the latest episode of The Roc City Showcase featuring "The Ca$h Man" Rich Jones.

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Good afternoon and welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. Yes, we still are in isolation. Looks like the governor has extended the stay at home orders until May. The team President Trump's talking about perhaps may first he may start lightning up the restrictions, but who knows if that's going to be the case. We'll talk about some of that and also some ways that you can deal with isolation, isolation and perhaps a stress that you're going through right now by being stuck in your homes. But before we do that, let's go home. Let's go to Rochesters best journalist, daddy singer. Good afternoon, Daddy. Oh my gosh, Matt, got to catch my grip. Beg You for letting me beyond the the show of Progester's best touch a hole all see there. We go. This is how we do with isolation. There's the vice president of the mutual admiration. You know, seriously, neither one of us have anything without you people reading, all listening. So I don't believe the thanks, in the praise and the appreciation goes to you. So thank you for joining US each week. Absolutely so. We are going to start with a non covid story. We will get to covid in a moment, but inning Han covid story for you. Older African Americans and Latinos are more likely than whites to get a diagnos of Alzheimer's disease, which may put a higher burden of care on their family. The University of Rochester Medical Center in January received a three point six million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health to study social connectedness in the overall health of older adults caring for a loved one with dementia. The social ties and Aging Research Center, called Star is a joint initiative of the Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry and the Ur School of Nursing. Mariah Canyon is Cordero, who holds a Clinical Faculty position at the R School of Nursing, to the star center plants to embrace diversity. The center plans to develop work groups that will help researchers work with community agencies to recruit minorities. In covid news, Rochester mere lovely warrants as to take a step back in dispute. After a large, peaceful visual to commemorate the most recent life loss to gun violence, the Rochester mayor urge people who think they have a dispute to settle, to step back and be mindful of the people that they love. The mayor said during an online news conference on April thirteen that it is up to each and every one of us to make a decision, a choice. We all get the same choice whether we want to save lives and protect our circle or we want to hurt our circle. Pulling the trigger, she said, is hurting your circle. Going out and not practicing social distancing is hurting your circle. In other Covid News, the Monroe County Sheriff's Office announced that on April twelve and inmate had tested positive for covid Nineteen Jill. The individual had been arrested by the Rochester Police Department on April seven and did not disclose that prior to his arrest on a weapons charge, he had been in close contact with a person who had tested positive for covid nineteen. The inmate was transferred to the covid compliment area at the sheriff's Brighton Facility. An announcement is expected at any time that schools will not open reopen this spring. Still on official but it...

...is looking more and more likely that schools will stay on a click mode, not a brick mode, for the rest of this academic year. Monroe County Executive Adam Bellow said the decision will be made jointly, with input from county officials, school districts and New York State. On April ninth, Monroe County Public Health Commissioner, Dr Michael Mendoza said in reality, the window of opportunity for us to real in schools before the end of the school year is closing. So the rights lawyers demand state numbers with all deliberate speed. As African Americans died disparently from covid nineteen. Is Often said that when America gets a cold, black America gets pneumonia or worse, and that has proven to be the case this week and the wake of reports that black people are contracting and dying from the coronavirus in greater numbers than other races and according to Christian Clark, who was president and Executive Director of the Lawyers Committee for civil rights under law, she's saying that we are deeply concerned that African American communities are being hardest hit by the covid nineteen pandemic and that racial bias may be impacting the access that they have to receiving testing and healthcare. New Measures of planned for black and Latino communities on the importance of covid precautions. Ministers may be making facebook videos and homes may be receiving robot calls. The city in the county will be using whatever tools are available to get out the word that social distancing its remains an important way to stop the spread of the virus. So far, Monroe County has not experienced that disparate health rate that we have seen nationally, but the fear is that it could and Mayor Lovely Warren said that if we do not exercise social distancing as well as staying home, we will see those numbers increased and we will see what is happening across the country. Tree right here covid nineteen changes funerals, but families still are able to say their goodbyes. Only one part of life has refused to yield to the pandemic and in fact the virus has made that part of life a starker reality. Families coping with the passing of a loved one, be it from the virus or any cause, must navigate new rules around how they are able to say goodbye. When it's on, visitors and hospitals make it hard, if not impossible, to be at the bedside. Social distancing means funerals are smaller but they can't proceed. Denece Williams, the president of D M William's funeral home and Rochester, said that for the families there's a lot of misinformation. She said she has heard from families that they've been told they can't view or it has to be cremation. It is not true, she says. Families most certainly are the point of contact and they still are in control. In editorials, columnist George Payne who saying that to leave God out of the pandemic. He's saying that something that always gets on his nerves is when religious people turn natural events such as earthquakes, floods and infectious diseases into divine acts of mercy and judgment. He is saying, let's leave God alone. There is no time for the blame game now. The situation is one that we made ourselves, is one that we are going to solve or be solved by. There was no sense in pointing the finger at God or waving finger at our perceived enemies on earth. Both actions, he says, are is a logical as they are cowardly. In the Bible says, every person shall bear his or her own burden. Michael Vaughan also writes about what our role is in the covid nineteen pandemic. He says it, while it is true that healthcare among African Americans lacks that of white Americans, there is a role that we as African Americans need to play, he says. Part of his focus is that African Americans are not victims and need to do what we can to take responsibility for ourselves also make the changes that we need to make for ourselves. He said that African Americans always will need assistence and support, because we, as human...

...beings, are never meant to do things alone. We need to lead instead of always following or looking for handouts from others or, hap hazard way, blaming others. Michael Vaughan says that we have a role to play in our own health and this denying, the denying of this, in the coming upset with officials and our society. That will help keep, at last, African Americans where we are. Thank you so much, Patty, as usual, and don't forget, as I always mentioned, if you want to hear the full version of the headline stories that Patty has talked about, you can visit the minority reporter Dotnet for all the full versions. You can also subscribe to the minority reporter on that side as well, and if you do have any questions or if you have suggestions for the paper, go ahead and send an email to editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And also you can find links to the minority reporter and all episodes of the inside the margins show on inside the margins RADIOCOM. All right, Patty, we're going to take a quick break and when we come back we will get into how it's you keep yourself from going stir crazy while being isolated. This is inside the margins. Will be right back. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Welcome back to inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. All right, so, before we get into talking about dealing with the isolation that we all are facing right now during this crisis, I briefly wanted to touch on the gathering that happened on Clifford in regards to that memorial service there. I know some a lot of people were upset about it because the records, with the information that we got, showed that there was perhaps a little over two hundred people that gathered over there and obviously they were not, you know, social distancing or wearing masks or anything like that. And people were upset because they said that they believe, you know, because Mary Lovely Warren came out and said that she allowed this to happen and there and people are like, well, why would you allow this happen during this time frame? So I just wanted to clarify on this real quick. Patti, and this is my understanding. I'm not sure if you understand different. It's not that the people who were holding the memorial service, they're called Mary Lovely Warren, and asked for permission to do that. What it really was is that they actually gathered already and then the call was left up to Mary lovely warrens who make them disperse or to allow it to continue, and she decide social she would not insight any more. I guess issues there where people would because people are already emotional and and in a different mental state. She didn't want to press anything and make things get worse, so she allowed that to continue rather than force the police to break that up. Is that how you understand him as well? That's how I understand that. That's the way she presented it when she talked about it at at the news conference that she said she had been in touch with a chief, Lauran singletary, from the I think this happened shortly after midnight, so on so on, the previous Sunday morning, more than week ago, and so the way she explained it, they were on the phone pretty much throughout those early hours of the morning about what was, you know, what was happening, or perhaps even what they thought would happen. Given this is very common in the community. There's something's a public death, you know,...

...a shooting or some violence, and people gather to remember that person. We have seen this throughout and so she said that she drove by, we should said, about eleven o'clock in the morning, saw the crowd, so that it was peaceful. She described it, as you know, as people who were there in mourning and grieving, and you're right. She made the decision that the better course in this situation was to let it run its course and not step inch that there were police that were there observing making sure that it stayed with its attended purpose to mourn this individual, to remember this individual. She said that people would not be allowed to gather there again after that period of time on that Sunday when it let it happened, but people go home, but not have it be a regathering place. The issue will be need to say this, if when there's another shooting right again, then then what happens? Does it do? People say, well, you will allow US degree for Mr McMillan. You can't allow us. You know, I don't want to be the mayor that day, right, police chief, that gay. So it's A. It's a difficult situation. If everyone shows up wearing, you know, nose in mouth covering, is that okay? And you know, I'm not trying to make light of it, but it's just these are difficult decisions in difficult situations and the people who have to make these decisions get put in these situations right for the of anybody's but somebody has to make this decision for the safety of everyone. Now part of the the health reporter, health educator in me is curious to know if any of those individuals who were there and up testing positive. Yeah, Iris. I mean so part of me becomes the scientist here and says, Oh, what a what a laboratory we just have, Yep, to see and that's that's a terrible thing to say too, because they were there to mourn, you know, their friend and their loved one. So you wonder if public health people see this is some sort of weird opportunity and and I don't know how this is going to be heard by viewers, but this it's, like I said, the scientist and you comes out and says wow, here's here's this opportunity. Maybe not a great analogy. In Michigan there are numerous protests against the governor's YEP policies. So if someone in that group test positive, do you do the contact tracing and say, well, you were in this group? Now it's not. It's not like, oh, I sliced the Bagel, I cut my finger. It's not that clear where you develop this problem, but it certainly could be part of the laboratory, you know, part of the information that you gather. So let us hope on more than one level that we don't see this again for a very long time so we don't have to make those decisions. Right. NOPE, you said up perfectly, I think. The real the only reason why I want to clarify that as because I saw, you know, and you and I have joked before about social media and how sometimes a lot of falseness or just people's erratic opinions get spewed on social media. So, and you know, but it's because of my job I have to post stuff on Polish on social media every once in a while, and I just saw a lot of different viewpoints, how people were looking and a lot of a lot of anger towards the Mare. And I'm not saying...

...that I understand people being angry. I do, I really do. I understand that. You know, people are concerned about that, but I just want to make sure that everyone understood that. It wasn't like, you know, someone called and said, Hey, I know you have these rules, as it okay if we break them, and she was like yeah, sure, go right ahead. It was it was more like, well, this is happening. Now what wh I do? Do I allow this to happen, or do I go in and stop this? So and you're right, if you're if you're the person it's got to make that call. That's a tough call to make, because you can make the problem worse by trying to forcefully remove people from stuff like that. And and that's that was kind of what she was that's what she was dealing with, and you're right to another great point you made is what is going to happen after this gathering? Will we see people in that group turn up testing positive for covid is that going to be now come? We don't know, but it's interesting in you're right, it's it's not something that you want to do to see this experiment, but it's something that you can look at and see how, if someone is the spreading things or how it does spread in groups like that. So those are two very good points that you made there. The other thing, too, is that you can't ever measure what you prevent. So I think in this will segue us into the end of the isolation staying at home, is that because you can't measure what you what you prevent. It didn't happen right. It's difficult for people to grasp why they're doing what they're what they're doing. You know, I don't have symptoms, I don't why I have to do this. How you going to know what it's going to work? And I read some quotes from earlier in the saying that we we're not going to know if we did too much, but we'll know if we did too little. So it goes a little bit to to the Mayor's action. Is that she you you don't know what you pervent, what you can prevent, but I'm not going to I can't say what she was thinking, but what she the sense I got from what she told us was her calculus of this is that not wanting to run the risk of something more happening. She she's got a police force that she's also in charge of does she want to put those individuals at risk of court? Point very well, of something else, by dispersing what she said umerous times was a peaceful gathering. You know, why get in the middle of some of the yes, he's they're not practicing social distancing, they're not practicing safe spacing, okay, but they're not really doing anything else. They're doing anything illegal. Right, exactly. So why insert into a very emotional time and have the run the risk of something getting I didn't know, everybody might have gone. You know what, you're right, we shouldn't. You're right. We've been here long and we can all the home. or it would have been that again. It's an emotional situation. You know why you here. Would just we're just standing here, let us do this. She wasn't going to win that. She's not the one that arguing you the way. No, didn't. She was in an Oly Situation Right with that. Oh so, discretion being the better pot of valor. And now I guess it's up to the public health department to see what really the implications for help, for decision. Yep, you're right and, as we both said earlier, I don't envy being in that position. Whatsoever. That's a tough call to make and I don't you're right. There's no there is no way you make everyone happy with with with whatever called you make there. So, all right, I don't want, I guess I don't want to spend too much time on that, but it's kind of want to just kind of want to briefly because I know some people had a misunderstanding about what actually happened there and how the decision was made to allow that. All right, so let's get back into what we want to talk about. And obviously everyone is going through this right now, pretty much everyone. There are some people that still are required to go to work where their jobs are considered essential.

I know you and I both have to do that still, but a lot of people are still stay either way, even with the with the work, you're still pretty much stuck. You can't go out to eat, you can't go out to do you can go to the gym, you can't go see your friends, you can't do a lot of things you can't do right now, and it's enough to drive you crazy. It's being kept in your house for a long period of time can definitely, you know, get into your mind. It can mess with you and people are beginning to show some signs of anxiety and in the pression and just not being well because they need it's it's like cabin fever almost, you know what I mean. People are they're stuck and they're going to get out. So how do you? How do you deal with that? How do you how do you move forward when you know that you really there's not a lot you can do about it. Is it's kind of out of your control. Well, hold that up, would say, because as you were talking, I was thinking about things that I have read about the inhumanity of solitary confinement. So they'll be lifetime like we look, we were about the Spanish flu for the past Hundred Years. Right, it was one thousand nine hundred and eighteen, right, hundred years. There will be enough to write about and study from all that's happened here. But one thing that's interesting is will incarceration change? Will Voluntary Change? Because now that those of us who would say, Oh, I never commit a crime, I would never be in solitary they're horrible people. They deserve to be in solitary confinement. Well, we've been in solitary confinement with Netflix, Internet computers, all these distractions that we have our phones, as long as the grid stays up. MMM, we're good and we are really struggling with this. So what about a person who is in solitary confinement with not none of those right with they don't have a phone to call somebody, they can't zoom, they can't face time. So do we change our view of solitary confinement and incarceration as a result of this? Now, that's a great point you. Everyone says you never know a person to you walk a mile in their shoes. Right, that's a everyone said that statement a million times and that's kind of your right and it's say and you're right. It's the funny thing is it's not even really a fair comparison because we still, I mean we're isolated, but we're not really being forcefully isolated. You can still go in your car and drive to your grocery store and get your food and then come back home. Where if you're actual solitary and jail, you can't do anything. You're just it's just you and you're in there. You're not calling anybody, you're not talking to anybody. You don't have a choice of what you're going to eat you really in solitaire. So the fact that we're getting all unraveled about this with all the luxuries that we have, you're right it. Just think about it. Just imagine it was worse. Imagine if you had none of the luxuries that you have to withstand this isolation that we're going through right now. Right. So, okay, in my little bits of anxiety I will think, wow, I really hope that homely in security is on its game right now, because what if the terrorists wanted to take down the grid? HMM, let's not get everybody all worked up. From the first person I've thought of that, but now, I mean, that's what that's sort of where your mind goes. So I'm thinking I'm hoping homely in securities working overtime on any kind of threats, because we met to a monkey wrench into everything and then basically bring down the world in economy and you know all our little doomsday apocalyptic scenarios. Yeah, maybe I got too much time on my hands and that's what you're saying. I need to get out of those. It's a great lock. It's a it's a great it's a great point because a lot of us are maintaining some sort of our composure because...

...of things like zoom. I just thought just the other day my kids, who are usually in school or in daycare during the day so we can work, they've been home with us and one of the one of the teachers, actually have like a zoom meeting with all the students so everyone could kind of see each other and kind of talk and, you know, tell each other they miss each other, all that good stuff. But without zoom, use that too, and you also lose a lot of abilities to work from home. I'm not just zoo my other programs, obviously, when I zoom is just one of the ones that we am using as an example. But if you use the if you lose the ability to Tele Conference or web conference or or talk to people on your cell phone or any of that stuff, all of a sudden you lose that one outlet that you rely on so heavily to connect yourself to people of the world. What does happen? What? Ye, so I think it is a very good point. Well, and think about, you know, what would have happened if this had been one in one thousand nine hundred and ninety one and we had the ice storm and people lost power who didn't? We don't even have to have, you know, terrorists whose power so making somebody can hit up a pole, can go down in your right and it wipes out, you know, five square miles. So it doesn't even have to be. But yeah, I think, I you know, I think about that. Let's end. If everybody who bought all this food for the next hundred years, you know, the power goes out, make a lots of routting stuff in the refrigerator. So I mean there're a lots of things. There are lots of things to worry about, right. So, okay. So how do you come your mind, right as I'm giving you all these things to worry to say? Well, don't let this be the last time you listen to this podcast. Don't turn out right now. It's a bad time come back, of back, of back, because one of the things I'm working on for something else is is a story about mental health during this time and I was speaking with a mental health professional who gave who, in because of our conversation, gave me something that I have been thinking about for the last few days, which is, when you are feeling anxious, to tap into your senses. So whether that's home or wherever you are, to to focus on your senses. So what does that mean where you are? Name five things that you can see, for things that you can hear, three things that you can feel, two things that you can smell and one, one thing that you can taste. So as you're feeling anxious, and I'm I'm in my poem Matson in his home. So if my will grant before had made me anxious, I would say, okay, what are the five things that I can see? I can see Matt on my screen. I look out my window and I can see pine tree and it's not doing anything, a little light breeze. I see the sun reflecting off, you know, houses in cars. I see the table that I'm sitting at and I see the plants in my in my room. You know, the four things that I hear? I hear mean addering you. You get the drift. So for the time it takes you to go through that exercise, you have slow you focused on what is immediately around you, what you're controlling, and so maybe for that period of time you have kept away the thoughts that were making you anxious. Right, Nope, and those are definitely good things. To big, because you're right, just being in my home for so long and I get again, I will admit,...

I don't want to say lucky, but I get may be able to say lucky that I have a chance to still go out of the House and work on some of the days that I'm I'm required to, but still it's you're still we're still stuckcure for a while and it's it does. It can play tricks on your minding, can get to you. So I think things like this, this, tips like this are good to try to keep subscenity in your in your household and you're into yourself, you know, just to make sure that you're not, you don't get lost in all the thoughts of the doomsday thoughts that you could have while you're sitting in your home. If you've ever traveled with somebody who's a friend, fighting you made, and I've done this. I've done a couple hiking trips with a friend and I remember before the first trip very clear I said, you know, we're going to be together, this potentially be stressful. I said I'm going to apologize in advance for anything that you know ticks you off something, because I just I we've never traveled together. We're friends, but we've never done this. So I don't know if doing sort of a preemptive, you know, conversation or something. Say, I know we've been you know we've been cooped up for a while and and you know. So if I do something, it's not intentional, right, and and because intentions are acting with with intent, lack of a better term, matter to me. What what are we intending when we do something or we say something? We could just be muddling into something and it could it could be completely accidental, and I think maybe doing something pre emptive with the people around you is that I'm feeling stressed by this. So if I if I react or act in a certain way, I am reacting to the situation. I'm not reacting to you. So please hear me say that. Right, right, that can kind of you know, again, be a be a bit pre emptive, you know, proactive rather than always reactive. Right, and that way, when you see someone maybe acting out of character, you remember what they said to you prior. Okay, you know, there's a chance that I may be out of character or I may be a little on edge because of the situation that we're put in. You know, I was just thinking, because we were talking before we before we got on. Do you think you could be an astronaut now, because it's because astronaut there pretty much into situation all the time. Right. No, it's interesting. I think it was a WATCHINGTON posted a story about they talked to astronauts about how to get through this. Some of the suggestions was do not count the days, do not be like, you know, the the little old prison movies. You're seeing it to right five. Don't do that because that's the reminder the others. Another suggestion from that article was to have a routine. Get up at seven, do work, do whatever, you know, a portion your day, but what it is you need to do, because for me it's the it's the endlessness of the hours and how will I fill that? HMM, that is a that is a trigger for me. By look out and I just see the highway to Utah, right, this is flat, straight road and those mountains in the distance never get any closer. That will cause me some anxiety. Right, I got to fill this space. I'm getting anxious just, you know, just and having that cont is talking about it. So I have to say well, in when I'm done with Matt, I have this coming up. I'm just coming and just coming up. Weekends, I find, are always difficult for me. Were variety of reasons, you know, being alone, having lost a party. Think you don't have you don't have that person to fill that right, right. So work is really good. So five days a week, I'm you know, but weekends, especially now, because you can't necessarily call...

...a friend, let's go to the coffee shop or just go to a coffee shop and hang out and just watch people like that is there anymore. So how do you structure the time that seems empty to you, right? How can you only so many times you can clean the house, right, and your breath, when you know my house is still looks the same way it did on march thirteen before all this, all this happened, right. So what is it that you can do? Will be back up. I'm not a license mental health professional, but I'm someone who's going through this like like you. Yes, and so what is working for me, when I'm hoping is working for me, is trying to find structure in every day, create some structure, and also to say to myself I am only and I am board okay, that was at five minutes this hour. Now what am I going to do for the other fifty five minutes of this hour before in the next hour I can spend five minutes saying I'm holding on board right now, and you made a good point. One thing I will relate to this to, even though it's completely different, is I was I was in the in the military, was of the Navy, and I remember when I was in boot camp, the one thing that I wanted to make sure I did not do was count the days until boot camp was over, because a lot of people were doing that and they are driving themselves crazy. I don't know they can make it another, you know, seven days or eight days or whatever, because I didn't do that. I was like, you know what, the military has a structured day for you. Just do the just get through the day and then, once you get through that day, get to the next day. That's kind of how I did it and that and all of a sudden it was time to graduate from BOOT camp, people who were counting the days like, okay, this is a nine week program, we're on day two. Chances that are you're going to have a tough nine weeks. If you're counting every single day because you're so you're wanting it to end so bad that it's not going to end fast enough for you. And the other thing, too, is if you're just looking to the end and you're there to defend my freedom, I kind of don't want you in. This is step right. So Looking, please don't skip to the last page of boot Camp when I am depending upon you to we took. Please read all those pages in between, because there might be something there. You know, mindfulness is has become a big business, the bus of mindfulness. It's a probably a multimillion dollar industry of things. But there's a there's a point to it of trying to be in the moment that you are, which is going back to that senses. You know, exercise when you're feeling anxious. Try to just slow things down and be where you are at the time. And again, not a license mental health professional, but that moment may be uncomfortable for you. Right. How are you going to deal with that discomfort? Hopefully the discomfort will pass, but it this is not a comfortable time for people. There's a lot of discomfort. Yeah, how can we be okay with the discomfort? It's going to last. Yeah, and that's that's tough and I like it. Just like you said, we all deal with it in different ways, but hopefully some of these suggestions just give you some thought processes on how you can go about this time. Because the here's the worst thing about this isolation. If, even though we keep getting these extended dates, you really don't know what it's going to end. So so, you so so. Trying to count days anyways or or anything like that is probably not going to be a benefit, because we don't know. That's the part. The unknown is still very prevalent our lives right now. It's this is a blizzard that will not end. It keeps snowing and snowing and snowing, and it's you know, wizards do end. You know the sun does come out in January after a blizzard. We don't know when. You're right, we don't know when this is going to end and it's taken away our sense of control and I think for many Americans, I know I am, I with...

...a privileged life that allows me to have a lot of control over my life. Same here. I do not have control over this, and so is this kind of like a twelve step thing. Do I have to sort of give up, give myself up to the higher power that's that's running this to find some some comfort in it? I don't know. But I do have to acknowledge that I don't have control over this. That frustrates me because I liked be in control and I have to acknowledge that I'm I'm just one of like how many billions pieces being moved around in this Patty I can I'll tell you this. I bet you a lot of people he even people who don't think they're controlling. People are used to having some sort of control and what and how they live their lives and all of us right now have pretty much given the wheel of somebody else. So we're all on the same boat and I just want to say hang in there and I also want to say, Patty, you're doing a great job and you continue to do a great job, and thank you for being with us again today, as you always are with us every week. Thank you for the opportunity that I appreciate. I appreciate you all right. Don't forget, patty singer, the minority reporter dotnet. Make sure you go there, subscribe and get the detailed and indepth version of all the stories that she covered during the headline news. All right, we are going to go ahead and take a break and when we come back we'll have a clip from the rock city showcase. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Welcome back. Welcome back to inside the Marquis. Okay, so, as usual for this last segment, we like to play little clip from our podcast show, the rock city showcase, the show that highlights Rochester and all the positive things in the people that make Rochter Rochter. This week's guest is the cash man, Rich Jones. He's the host of a wrestling UF Sek show called the pain clinic. He is also the producer of kick this with Soccer Sam and he does a lot of other production. One of my one of my good friends as well, and it was really fun to have a chance to sit down and talk with him and just kind of get his story and that you can check out the rock city showcase where ever you get your podcast, I mean anywhere itunes, the tune in radio APP, Google play. I heart radio. It's on all of them, so, wherever you get them, check it out. I think it's a pretty good show. And here is a clip. And also, don't forget, you can catch all of the past episodes of inside the margins and the Rock city showcase on our website at inside the margins radiocomic, and that's inside the margins radiocom all right, time for me to get out of here. Enjoyed the clip and we'll see you next week. Take care. This is the rock city showcase. Rich Jones. Ay, rich, are you doing buddy? Hey, thank you so much for inviting me. Imagine that we're in the same room. This world has changed so much in the last five weeks. Crazy how even hold up better than good. I am holding up, I mean I you know, I live for these days in which I can come up here and get away from my humdrum existency, you know, living on my couch and right staying isolated. You know, yeah, I've trust me, I'm there with you. Oh Yeah, all right. So one thing that we do have in common besides you are actually the host of a show that actually do enjoy to listen to on Fox I'm a longtime wrestling fan. I have been since the S, back in the day when Holgan and Mr...

...t and Roddy Ready Piper all the back then when the first rustle media happened in the third one where who can slam under the giant? So I just want to ask you, wouldn't you become a wrestling fan it and and how did you get into UFC also, and what made you want to do a show? It's cool. Well, I've running a wrestling fan since, believe it or not, there was a time in the I've lived in Rochester my whole life and there was a time when there was only for TV channels. Yeah, yeah, and and we suddenly got this fifth one. It was Wuh AF of his channel thirty one, which is fox down, and when that came on all the sudden it opened the world to a lot of syndicated style programming that I've never seen in my life before. And one thing it happened to do was it would show wrestling every Sunday night at seven, and so I started watching it, I think when I was in seventh or eighth grade and I sorry, I became a you know start. You know, I was a Bob Backlin was the wwws champion at the time and I just kind of I just kind of liked it, you know. And it's like and and my dad tolerated it, which he's very big sports fan, but he would like, let us watch that once every every month or every couple months. Madison Square Garden Channel we have, which I think is still around today. Everyone still has it. They would show a show from a wrestling show from the Midis Square Gardens, from the arena, and it was pretty cool because they would just broadcast it on their ma MSG channel. So not only did I get to watch it every Sunday night on Fox or WHF channel thirty one on back then, but then I you know, and and then, but we also got to watch and then I realized, only goodness, there's these other channels and there's wrestling on Saturday afternoon. It's but it's from North Carolina. It's called mid Atlantic wrestling. And then then then what? Then another one, it was a WTBS would show Georgia championship wrestling every Saturday night from six hundred and five to eight hundred and five. And you know, and I so overdose Doun it pretty quick and I think I do give it credit to a cable TV for doing that because, you know, like I said, we had four or five channels, but when cable happened, that's when all all the out and out it's broke free and we got maple leaf wrestling and all these channels from Buffalo and Syracuse, which is show stuff as well. And I became a big fan and I was through high school and then, you know, I went off to college and kind of let it go by the side for a little bit and then and then I started when I started dating my wife, my son started watching it when I'd come into work on the weekends and he got me into it, back into it again. So we're talking like one nineteen, Ninety, one undred and ninety two. I started getting back in analyst and I wasn't completely out of it. I mean they would Monday night raw was on. I would try to watch that when I could against you know, unless there's a better football game of money and football. But so yeah, so I started watching again and then it really started blowing up in popularity about one thousand nine hundred and five and ninety six and and I you know my friend Soccer Sam, who runs who is the the host of kick this, the soccer show that I was producing at the time, said, you know, I'm doing two hours a week and we're offseason. I don't know what we can do to fill the time. And I said, you know, I thought about this a while. I know there's some guys doing it up in Toronto. Let's try doing a pro wrestling talk show. And he's like, Charlotte's go for it. So he went. You know, he got out. You know, he he was all into it because he was really watching it a lot back then to with his kids, and so we started doing it on Saturdays and he because he he has all these connections and everything. We were having commercials on TV where they would promote it during raw and so we had a built an audience as soon as we started on Saturday mornings. It was insanely crazy, but we did it a little bit more like a show, more showy than it is now, and now we try to do it like news and you know, news and storylines and stuff like that. Back then we are all each each had our own character and that's where the cash man came from.

Yeah, I was richie rich, the cash man and his dog dollar that was sought, but I was named by Soccer Sam so and we all we crammed it down to the cash man, and so I mean that we started our very first show is in November of one thousand nine hundred and ninety eight and we just finished up today as another one. So it's we're almost twenty two years into doing a pro wrestling talk show on Fox sports eighty. Had People Change, come and go. Soccer Sam had stepped down. He was a figurehead for a company that didn't you know, his character is Dr Love, and they felt he was a little maybe not in the best best representative for the company that he owned. So he had to step back and he let me take reins of it and since then we've been you know, people names and faces may change, but one person who always will be there will be the cash man, because I'm here and I started it. We all started it. So that's a long running show and that's something that we are similar too, because I happened to me. I did the thing where I was a big fan in the early s and I was until right until like maybe one thousand nine hundred and ninety issue, and then I kind of fell off myself and then I kind of got back in during the attitude era. Yeah, and like that, and that came. So, yeah, I kind of did the whole drift out, drift back in and and you know, kind of state of fan. Now you also incorporate UFC. Yeah, well, show to is that correct? Well, we do in general. Forty. Yeah, I mean we we were all fans of it and but there's a host we had a few years ago. His name was Murph, and Murph loved UFC and so we. He loved wrestling to, but he would like he said Hey, he said hey, come on out to come on out, we'll watch this stuff together and maybe you'll get an it's I've always been intrigued by it, but I was kind of felt, you know, and the early days of UF see, I kind of bought into the hype and whatever it was saying. It's like big guys versus little guys. It's not really fair that way. But really, when it became when they started doing like weight weight class restrictions and everything, it became very exciting and so I kind of was into it a little bit, you know, and then and then, but Murph, it made me blow up big time. We would go out to like Tinseltown and watch UFC pay per views on the big screen. And so, yeah, I've been real and so and that was another aspect to of wrestling, because there's a lot of people who like pro wrestling that love UFC as well, and sometimes people crossover to we saw Rohonda rows, we saw brock lessner, both being champions in the USC Rock Right, can sham rock? Yeah, Dan Severn hit up in the studio up here with us one day. So you still me the picture? I've sually. Yeah, and so there's a lot of these and and of Rochester. Of course, John Bones Jones, you know that Huss where he was born, came from. So it's like, so we have a lot of connections to UFC and and it was a really, really, really exciting to and really I can get into it. And then it became a double advantage for the pain clinic because we could go out in our sponsors and host pay per views for UFC. It gave us a couple nights out there where we could draw crowds to the to the restaurants and bars that we were at. And so and I love watching it. So it's like, I mean I've so and it was so new to me. Maybe you know. I mean no understanding the rules and everything, maybe ten, fifteen years ago, but now it's like I love that. I just you know, it's one of those things where I can't I definitely don't want to miss it. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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