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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 25 · 2 years ago

Mandating Diversity and Equity

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Disscusion on the push to mandate diversity and equity

You're listening to one hundred nine FM, W X R LP in Rochester New York, the home of extreme independent radio. Find us at one hundred and nine w x ircom Hey folks, it's Jason Taylor here, host of evidence of design. Please tune into our show on Saturdays from eleven am to twelve PM, where we dig into political economic analysis of issues affecting us right here and right now. Come think with us on a hundred point nine FM wx Ir. Only in Rochester, New York, marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Hello, welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. Hold it still the big news story. Obviously there's a kind of a balance between the whole protesting and the race relations and covid those are the two, the two major stories going on, and we're going to discuss them both because there's a lot there's a lot going on right now and we're just going to work trying to get a grip and just kind of understand what's happening and what's going to be happening. So to help me understand, because I need all the help I can. Jet Here is the minority reporters. Patty singer. Hello, Patty, get a grip is the active every APP phrase. I feel like I'm at few I feel like I'm at the edge of the cliff and I just trimmed my nails. A lot of grab right. I am sure that there are lots of people. Again, I go back to Shakespeare. The world is too much with us. Yep, absolutely so. How much the world is with us for minority report of this week we have we have some things that you can do to help your community. We're going to we're going to start off by the nomination to open for Athena Awards, which honor female business leaders. The Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce and it's winning council affiliate seeking nominations for the two thousand and twenty one Athena International Awards. They said these recognized is in power women in business. There are several categories. You can get more information by calling to five six for six hundred sixty five. That is two hundred and fifty six, four six sixty five. Or you can go to bite, which is the item dot L I Fina No, Athena and Oms, you can find out how to nominate a female business leader. Jamond meeks wins the one hundred and thirty seven assembly primary. MEEKS, who led by nearly nine hundred votes after in person voting ended on June twenty three. Jun Twenty three recorded two hundred and seventeen more absentee votes than the endorsed candidate, Ernest flaggler. There is no republican opponent in the one hundred and thirty seven, which makes meeks the presumptive assembly person. However, people can enter write in candidates in the November election. Frontline workers deemed essential and helping develop a covid nineteen vaccine. People in high risk occupations the essential workers who have had daily contact with the public, while others could work from home. These individuals are being sought to volunteer for a phase three study of a potential covid nineteen vaccine. That trial is expected to start in August at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The research is funded by the National Institutes of Health and if you want more information about that you can go to www dot covid research dot you are MC. COVID research dot you are MC or you can phone two, seven six five two one two. Two, seven six five two, one two. There's a petition to rename the airport for Frederick Douglas. The person who started the petition, Richard Quaser, says that quote. I believe this is the moment to recognize Frederick Douglass. The petition received twenty eight...

...hundred signatures within two days of going live on change dot org. Adam bellow campaigned on diversity and his transition team use that word more than a dozen times in a report it gave him back in February, and on July fourteen the county executive started to turn words into actions. He started a process for Monroe county to have a department of diversity, equity and inclusion. His proposed legislation to change the county charter will have to go through the regular process and could take a couple months. In editorials, Julian Malveaux writes about the enemy within. She says, how do we dismantle the gun culture that dominates so many of our inner cities. Who would take new laws are SHR penalties for illegal gun use? And, as Atlanta Mayor Bottoms said, this is not about the police, even as the communities resist police brutality, structural racism and other inequities, we must fight the enemy within, who she calls callous young men who engage in gun play on public streets when anybody could be walking by. Dr Faye Williams rights and black women and children's lives matter, that the real challenge for people who are dedicated to broadening understanding of black lives matter is changing the concept of Bom from a slogan to a way of life. And so doing, she writes, we develop the ethic of embracing actions and ideas that encourage and stimulate positive growth in our communities. In this week's Biz Quiz, can Mitchell answers the question do I need a separate bank account for my business, and you can read about her rationale for her answer. Don't want to tip our hand here, Matt. Well done, Patty, and thank you as always, and here is the self promotion portion that I always do here. If you want to listen or read the full versions of these stories. Make sure you visit the minority reporter Dotnet. You can see the full stories, including the last one that betty just teased. You can see that full version that story on that site. You also will have the opportunity to subscribe to the minority reporter, which I certainly suggest you do. It's always important to support local media, local journalism, so certainly do that you have you'll have options of print and also the digital format, so you can certainly do that. If you have any questions or actual suggestions as to stories that should be covered, you can send those two editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And, as always, you can catch this, this episode already past episodes of inside the margins on our website at inside the margins Radiocom, where there's also links to get you to the minority reporter and you can subscribe to us as well. All right, let's go ahead and take a quick break our daily discussion with petty singers. Next, right here on inside the margins station, good point nine. It's tuned into rock house finus on one hundred nine FM WX IRLP in Rochester. Me You. Yes, yes, rock tops finance were back again. WHAT'S UP, everybody? I got something to bring a void. P did he hit the news again? Okay, according to the news republic, they're saying that La Officer alleges that P diddy put out a hit on pop. I'm believe none. Alia, cops, we got this. We have this news report from this professional light, which I think about. This remy and Nicki Venas thing jazz to me. I just think everybody's out here trying to get their money and I think remy's going underneath the belt to try to climb to the top. She's a grimy chick to me. That's where people don't have to like me. I'm a CHEMT for a minute. Now back check this out. We bought to take a music break. Will be back in a minute with more rock towns finess. So we have another guess. We have these money, the money to right bad by. What's going on? It's been a while since I see you, man right. Took a break for a minute, so I figure I'll come back. Some hard fish ahead. Make sure you check out rock towns finess on one hundred point nine F wxier. Every Saturday, six PM to eight PM. You can catch it at one hundred point nine f them, or you can go online at www wx ircom. Rock Tus finess, you're listening to you inside the margins on one hundred point nine wx ir, extreme independent radio and...

Rochester's Urban Alternative Music Station. Welcome back to you inside the margins. It's Matt and I am here with Patty. So first off, if I could so it might able to nominate you for that award, because I'd not mainate you for for women in business. If possible. You know what, butter under so no, I don't know. I did. They take exubmissions for Pulitzers Act. If I would, I'd not absolutely welcome. So we have a gambit of different topics that we can kind of cover today because there's a lot going on. So I'm going to kind of start kind of in the middle. It's kind of a kind of covers both. So we're going to talk about that whole diversity thing with Adam Bella. What kind of go from there? So Adam bettle bellow is trying to put together an organization to kind of implement diversity within the city. I also understand that he's also in favor of renaming the airport to Fredder Douglas, which is I think that's pretty cool. He's a obviously prominent figure here in Rochester and I think you and I during the week we kind of talked about kind of people trying to force diversity and if it actually works or how how it can backfire. Our are if something that's actually can be done, and we kind of got into a discussion about things like a friend of affirmative action. I'm not even sure if that's still something that's real today. I don't know if that's the only action, but I know that that that mandate was to try to forcibly make companies hire minorities. Now the thing is obviously people are now being hired because of their race instead of not being hired because of their race, and also they they may just be hiring their quota right. So if you have to hire two blacks and you have a company of a hundred, you will hire those two blacks and as will be your to quote unquote, token blacks. It's a looks we have blacks on the company. So I want to get your thoughts on that and and because you're you're a woman in journalism, I'm sure it was not easy for you as well. You may you may have some of the same issues that I've actually experienced in my life. So just want to kind of get your thoughts on on that whole at whole diversity ideal. You know, it's funny we talked this week. We said people the expression is you can't legislate morality, but a lot of people are trying to legislate diversity. Right, it's the same. It's the same way of your legislative morality of doing things that are right. I am a beneficiary of affirmative action due to my indoor plumbing. So I the beginning of my career I was in sports and so I sort of came of age in sports writing in the early to mid s when, if anybody's listening old enough, they can remember what was a lucky and sports illustrated nonsense with the Yankees and and everything that went on. So I think my the first job I ever ever had in journalism a sixteen and I got hired because my dad knew the publisher of the local paper. So that was never because that wasn't as higher by kid. That wasn't else. In College, a couple jobs I had through coop. You could argue my first job out of college. No, I think that may have been really the only job I got that was on my merit. Because what was interesting about that I interview for another position. They didn't hire me. I was overqualified and when the sports writer they are left, they called me and said Hey, now we've got a position that you are qualified for. Right on it. Yes, I came to Rochester because they had not had a female in their sports department for a very long time and so they had somebody who was doing baseball at the time, but they wanted somebody full time baseball writer, and so I was hired. I don't know how many other people were interviewed. So I know what it is like to have to be twice as good. I can remember one time in my first year, the first couple months, becoming quite upset at how one of the editors was sort of treating me and treating my copy. Now, all we've, all writers, no matter what, think that everything we write as golden pros and do not turn that period upside down. Do not do that right. We've everything is perfect. But this person said, you know, don't let that person you know, upset you or distress you or whatever I he said something...

...can't be repeated here, but the message was that you're good. Don't let somebody who may have his fear, his insecurity or whatever kind of try to run you, run you down, run you out. I was the victim of hazing by a colleague and to my knowledge, nothing was done to that kinague. So again, how much trust do I have in the system? I'm really going to go to my editor with a problem. I think we talked about this with the me to movement. Yeah, sure, good, I'M gonna go. When I have it, a me too example in not in my immediate workplace but with the team I have to cover, I'm going to go to my to my boss, knowing that there is well, there wasn't a hostile work environment, one warm and fuzzy right, so there were. I definitely had trust issues with the person who hired me and several of the people I had to work for and work with. So I was hired because I was amchanisms haired, because I was female. They hadn't, you know, somebody once said to me, we haven't. We hadn't had a female in the department since this party, name this person ex number of years ago. The longer I work there, the more I understood why. Yeah, yeah, so it's the same thing. You know. Can you make a mistake? Did you make a mistake? Because you made a mistake? And you make a mistake because your female? Did you make a mistake because you're emotional? Did you make a mistake because you're not qualified write? The two ways you want to make the mistake are you made a mistake, that you made the mistake and because you weren't qualified. Right, you know, want to make email or black or whatever. But people are going to make mistakes. And there was really only two places I worked, the first job I had out of college, the second job I had out of college, where when I ran into difficulty with sources, being barred from locker rooms and stuff like that, the institution stepped up. When I was barred from a club house here, I was told you handle it really. Yeah, really, I'm handling it. When my last two papers, the institution handle it and I and I will never forget the words of the managing ender my first job, when I came back and told them, he goes. You know, we've called our lawyers and they're calling their lawyers and I've told them and I said, you want to take it? You told me he said to them, do you want to take it to court? And the next game I was it was yeah, I still got Hayes, I still got Ras. Yeah, it was. None of it. was. None of that, because the managers, I'm not this is our reporter. You deal with it, you meaning your organization. So start, black employee, this is our Latino play, this is our Asian employee. Deal with it. What are we afraid of, which goes to what something else we talked about. Fear. Yes, there is fear. Okay, there is fear on a lot, a lot, a lot, a lot of levels. And I have fear now. Yeah, it's been going on about, you know, is my city going to be safe? Am I going to be safe? Going to be a protect so I'm I am very fearful of lots of things. I think what's helping my mental health right now is I am admitting I am very fearful. I'm not trying to tamp that down right right. I think I think it's I think it's in this this climate, it's almost impossible to not be a fearful of some things about you know, I'm you've met me, in person many times. I'm a large person. I'm not really. I don't have a lot of fears of people per se, but in this climate I do. You know it, because there, because you don't know what's gonna Happen. Now I want to go. I'm gonna go back and wanting to kind of come back again toil. What we tell what we're at. So I don't want to incriminate any any establishment that I've ever worked for, so I'm going to be very vague when I talk like this. But you're absolutely right. In our field, in journalism and in broadcasting, opportunities are diminishing. The local, the local platform of broadcasting and journalism is getting smaller and smaller and smaller. So getting jobs in that field is getting tougher and tougher. So, unfortunately, and it should, we should not feel this way, but I know you, just as you discussed about you being hazed. Sometimes in your mind you're like, should I just grin and bear it? You know, because I I don't, because if I don't...

...then I may feel obligated to leave. And if I leave, how do I get back in? You know, because it's so hard to be in there here in the first place and that that should never be your mentality. But I know in the back of your especially when you're just getting in, when you're just starting, that's how you think because you're afraid to burn bridges and be an outcast right up the bat. You you want to establish. What's your establish just easier for you say, you know, we'll screw yourself, I'm going to do I'm going to go somewhere else or whatever. But when you're not established, when you're trying to become something or somebody, that fears real, that fear of being you know, if I don't, if I don't just tolerate what's happening to me, I guess I won't be able to move up. And you know, in the organization you should never feel that way. But I think that's a legitimate people feel that way and and their and their professions. Well, and then it becomes especially so add the add whatever stereotype you want to being the mine already right. So you're the angry black many type, right, the emotional woman, the rat exactly. So you add you, you add all that and you know I'm being Hayes. That is upsetting to me that I have a colleague turning on me. I'm an emotional person, but I can't show that emotion because then I'm your tag, the emotional woman. Right, then you're the big angry black that yeah, right, here we go. So allies become important and it's interesting. I've done a little bit of reading, not a ton, but there is a perception that women will undercut other women will not be supportive, and I kind of saw a little bit of that early in my career when I did big league baseball. You weren't many females and they weren't. One was incredibly supportive and I had read every book she's written because she was incredibly supportive of me. Others were not and because it was it because I was just from a small paper, small fry whatever, there was this very much pecking order among female sports writers that if you weren't of their level you really didn't matter, which is really sad because it was the small local papers in the s that were hiring women who needed the support of the national names and weren't getting it in my experience. So there's an incident when, when I was covering big league baseball, there was a particular team that in a particular year was just horrible to women, just horrible, and so I ran into that and it was interesting because I knew something was going on and I refused I kept my eyes in the person that everybody the cluster was around interviewing. I refuse to turn around, even though I knew something was going on behind me. Afterwards, get back up to the press box and a couple of people who cover of that the offending team, said to me, did you Bubba Bah? You okay that? I said I just refused to turn around because I knew something was up. I was hus turn around. One person wanted to lodge a complaint. Another person who worked with that gentleman who covered that team said, well, she's got an editor, they can do it. So there you have your allies. Right. One person was all I and one person probably didn't want to hurt his position with the team, like he'd be the heavy although they won't talk, thinking well, maybe they won't talk to me if I covered the outcast. Right. Yeah, so there is a tremendous amount of pressure to go along to get along, whether that's how you treat a woman or whether that's how you treat am a black right, yeah, you're absolutely right. You're absolutely right. I guess it. It's comfortable and it's a tough thing to deal with and it's I and it's hard for other people. I guess we get it you because you being a woman and may be in a minority. We can kind of relate on these kind of things. If you're not in that in those shoes, I'm sure there's other avenues that that are similar, that you know paths that are similar, but it's hard to relate to that if you're just a regular guy going through the regular process of moving up in the company. Now I wanted to get back to fear, because that that to me, is important. It's not just a you said it perfectly. There's fear on it's multi leveled or multi layered fear, because it's not just one fear that as at the basis of, I think, racial tensions or tensions out in general. It's a bunch of different kind of fears. It's not just the fear for your life. It's just a fear for your life's the fear for people taking your job. It's a fear for your way of life being disturbed. Stuff is it's all types of fear. So I guess the question that we have to ask, Patti, is how do we get past these fears in order to actually kind...

...of unite on the same front? So let me add another fear, because this is what where I kind of thought you were going, that is. So, what about a fear of a white man who has who is thinking? You know, okay, first two person was a women, you know. Now it's minorities and, as you said before, where's My job? And you know, it's not my fault on Black, it's not my fault on female, it's not my fault of a white man. Right, Yep, right. But yet we seem to be whereas we seem to assign value to all of those characteristics and not value where it needs to be, is what can be your performance. Now people would argue that, well, systematic and structural racism has made it difficult for blacks to achieve an educational level or gather the skills that may have been more common. Even you, as a female, may have, may have been exposed to. That's true, but then that goes sort of back to the affirmative action. If if I couldn't calculate an earn run average, right, if I couldn't know when there was a situation to funt, if I didn't know what a sacrifice was and I didn't know that that that wouldn't count in somebody's you know, for for with the sacrifice, that doesn't count in their batting average. I'm not going to get that. I'm not going to last in that job right, right, if I'm not going to know that. You know often you you know. Why would you bring in the lefthander if you're going to face a righthanded? Hit it hit. I mean, granted, strategies change your baseball, but if I don't know the basics of that, I don't know what a closer is and a setup man is, I'm not going to last long. Right, guardless of my gender, on my color, we right. No, how do I get, how do I have a female get that opportunity? How do you, as a black person, get the opportunity to study computer science? If you're interested? School doesn't offer it, but that's what you're interested in. So I think these are the things we need. We need to think of. We need to make sure that opportunity is is available for all. A lot of women really don't care that. You need to hit behind the runner. Watch don't care about computer science, but we have to expose people to different things and let them decide. And then where does fear come in in that? Because if you are interested in computer science and so's my son, they're going to be able to compete? I don't know, and everybody's fear is different and I think if you can acknowledge there are metaphorical monsters under the bed and in the closet, right, yeah, and open the closet and look under the bed and see the monsters. All right, let's go into another quick break. This is inside the margins. Will be right back. You're listening to one hundred point nine fmx IR LP and Rochester, New York, home of extremes independent radio. Find this add one than hundred and nine wx. I arecom on the way everyone, Jana Cruiz here inviting you to check out my new show, vibe out with Kajana on one hundred point nine w x ir, extreme independent radio. Now, this show focuses on Jazz, blues and Soul Music from all eras, on the arts of all kinds, and was created to be a platform to help local and in the artist get more exposure. So if you are looking for a place to listen to jazz, Blues, Soul Music and music by local artists, then come vibe out with Kajana every Tuesday afternoon to to four PM on one hundred point nine W Xiar, extreme independent radio. You're listening to inside the margins on one hundred nine wx ir, extreme independent radio and Rochester's Urban Alternative Music Station. Welcome back to inside the margins. I'm here with Patty singer from the minority reporter. So I guess if we're going to kind of stay on this topic here, as far as opportunities and and and, you know, competition between everyone being on the same an even playing field and and having those opportunities to be available to everyone, do you think that maybe during like a hiring process, though this is I thought about this before. I don't think it's something that could actually ever happened that maybe before you actually meet somebody be or or actually interact with them visually, maybe perhaps just just interact with...

...them via skills test or something like that. That way you have pretty much you can't obviously you can't do that with every profession, but there are some professions where you can just assess someone's skill set with just a skills test and you can see how much they know about the field that they're applying for without seeing their without knowing their sex, without knowing their well, I guess the name maybe give it away, but still you don't you you still don't see them. So you don't really know their race, you don't know anything. All you know was their talent of the of the job and then at that point you can bring in like your finalist and then you can kind of choose from there. I don't know if I don't know if that's something that would work or yeah, I'm trying to think. Okay, so how would that be? If you know, you can give me a copy editing test. You can send out the copy editing test or you can you can give everybody the link to the copy editing test and they go in blind and you assign them a number, like like you do in a study, like double blind to see your control. Right. Okay, maybe, but I guess, I guess. I think. Okay, how much work would that be for hiring managers? Yeah, they just really want to do that, think that they need to do that kind of work. I don't know. I have never been a hiring manager. I don't know what's involved in making the decision. Sometimes, if I just need somebody, I need somebody right. So, yeah, I could see somehow, somehow double blind placeboing in early part of it. Phone interviews. was supposed to do that because you have a do I have? I mean, yeah, female. You hear that my voice, but you won't look at me, you won't know if I'm pierced, you won't know if I'm right exactly what I will probably say you. You sound like again, this is stereotyping. You sound like you are African American. Yes, no, I I get that. You have a deep voice, right, and I get that. I get that. So Um, but when you walk in the door, you can see from the person's face if they're looking for you or if they're surprised. Right. There's an example. So last year, shortly after I came minority reporter, I worked with a colleague and the two of US went to interview a performer who was in town, native of the area, coming back to the town we went. I could set it all up to email and phone conversation. She and I walked in the apartment, open the door. He kind of looked at me and I do my name and he goes, I thought you were black. That's nicest thing anybody said to me. All Right, thanks, so you don't. But he was momentarily taken aback. Act Right like wow, you know, so white. Well, they well, I know what that means. Right. But whenever I knew about him, or maybe because I had googled them and knew a little bit about them, he thought I was more familiar with his words are I have no idea. So when somebody opens the door and use or you sit in your office, but the deal is going to be blown sky high. They're either their biases are going to come out or not right. Their instructions from a hiring manager are going to come out or not right. Right. NOPE, that I get that part, but I guess the anything. You're right, I don't think. I don't think it that works well in our professions. I don't think. I think you have to be seen, because you you know I but there's some there are some professions I think maybe that'll work, and you're right. Once you actually meet the person you can be like, Oh, I thought you're you know, and I could kind of throw you off, but you may already have developed a certain feeling about why this person's fantastic. I want them, and then maybe when you see them, it kind of doesn't throw them out of the room. You might. Well, they're not what I thought they're going to be, but they're still from what I saw, they were awesome. said, it's the only reason why it's kind of a hypothetical things, because it's not going to work for all professions anyways. There are some, there are some professional where you have to interact with people and and their personality and the way they look and think. It's it's kind of important to their job. So so it wouldn't work in those kind of and those kind of jobs. So here's the other thing to wear. Networking and opportunity to network with people in power becomes important, which is why let's go back to a theater award. Nominate somebody for the Athene Award. This is really important. And nominate Patty Singer. By the way, I can't done that, believe me, I'm not a business person, trust me. All right, so I met my previous job, previous city that I'm living in, knowing that at some point I need to move. I love the job, but the community.

I can't live in the community anymore. So I call up somebody I know when I was in college and said Yeah, Hey, I'm starting to look for something, and he says, Oh, call and he says, you know, call this guy at his paper and talk to because he's connected to a lot of people. So I wasn't very far from I was in your office. Guy Was in Baltimore. CALL HIM UP. Let's me. He he had worked here in Rochester. He was friends with people up here. He knew my initial contact and we were triangulating here. So we sit and in plus the fact he can recommend me because he could go to the other to the sports reporters at his paper and say hey, so patty's covering the o's in the cult cold. What's you know? What can you tell me? Right, yeah, nothing out of the ordinary. Fine, gets a lot whatever. So meanwhile, you know, this guy calls up here and says, Hey, you know, looking for a baseball writer. Look at this person. So I come up for the interview. They know they're hiring female. They probably know they need a female, but I came with the good housekeeping seal of approval from somebody the hiring person here trusts. So that guy's reputations on the line to he's not going to send a dot right, because he likes the people up here. He's not going to send a bird. Yes, have to get to the community and you know if you things rougher, whatever, but the basic tools are right. Yeah, right, all, right place. So it's the old saying it's not what you know, it's who you you know people who have been marginalized or not had opportunity. who were they knowing? How are they? How are they again? This has to be some personal responsibility here. How would they pursue positioning themselves to know people? So if you are in school, say what you want about Rochester City School district, they do have clubs, they do have organizations. Get involved and learn some skills and meet your teachers or meet Faculty who's not your teacher. So this person comes at you. They don't have any preconceived notion of right because this is the advisor to the club who's never met you. And and start they're slow. I mean, if who knows what school is going to look like this, you're probably not a whole lot of in person. But when we get back to in person, or you, when we get back to to do zoom, club meetings, things like that, put yourself in a position for somebody else to know you. Yeah, that's how things are. May, may open up for you. Yeah, no, you're right. I will admit two of yeah, two of my jobs that I've gotten in broadcasting, even though the current one that I have a good portion of it was because someone already knew me and had recommended me. Recommended me do someone in the organization and that's the end. Then they gave me a shot. So so you're right. Networking is huge. It's probably sometimes more important your skill set, because if if you're you're the most skilled person the planet, but you have no way of getting in, you don't know someone to get you in that door in the first place, that no one's ever going to see or know about your skill set. So you're right, and networking is very important and and to put yourself in a position to know people so you can get into that. But to get into that networking circle is important and you're right. At there are a lot of clubs and even if you're even if you go to a two years college and you know you can in turn somewhere and that that came in be your way in. So I think that's that's a that's very, very important and I'm glad you said that. That's that's extremely important and getting to where you want to be. I think I think people think of networking is what is somebody going to do for me, and I gotta shows them. But, and I think that is sort of networking a bad name and it gives popular people in networking circles. Oh, here comes somebody else who wants something from me. Yeah, willing to give to get. I am not strong as net worker in the world and it's hurt me and and some occasions because I feel as I don't know that I have anything to reciprocate in that transaction on that a position to help, because when you're a journalist you can't be in a position to help because it looks like you were trading favors. We can't do that right. So excuse me. That's always put me in an awkward position for that. But you also can't be just all all charm and a flashy suit, because then you get the job. You some substance. Yeah, maybe five years, but people are going to see that that was all charming a flash. Exactly right. Right, you got you actually have to have some skill set behind that. Before we get out of here, right, I wanted to touch on this real quick. I thought what we talked about was pretty important, so I want to kind of start off with that, but I do want to real quick. We'll talk a little covid and then we'll get out of here. So I believe it was Thursday night governor Cuomo...

...came down with the mandate. And regard to the bars in Rochester, their bars and not Rochester, New York State, I'm sorry, and all of New York state. They're no longer going to be able to just get up and walk and get your drinks. You have to be seated and also you can't your establishment has to have food. So you can't just go to an establishment to just drink. You actually have to be able to order a meal. In fact, you have to eat a meal while drinking, so you can't just go go to a place to just straight up drink there. I've seen some some of the responses on that. A lot of people are upset. A lot of obviously the bars who are just bars. Of course they're going to be upset because it's sorting their business, which I totally understand. But I also understand why he did this. The numbers were beginning to kind of go up a little bit and if you look around the country, there are some states there are doing terrible and those states are are doing each oble because they've had a lot of huge gatherings of people were out partying and drinking and covid numbers just spite. And we came from a place where our state was the epicenter of Covid and we're now one of the best states in the country as far as codd, as far as being, you know, clear out and fighting the curb. And I think in my opinion, and I want to get your opinion on this, to Patty, I think what the governor's trying to do is he doesn't want to go backwards and he also doesn't want to eliminate the possibility of going out. So instead of saying all right, I'm shutting it all down, bars are no longer have the ability to be open, he's saying, listen, you guys are messing up and this is your last chance. So we're going to keep the bars open, but now you can't just go to the drink you have to stay seated, you can't go get your own drinks and you have to be eating a meal while you're there's that way you're not mingling and walking around. So there's some obviously there's some gray area there. So what's your thoughts on that? So it's someone who doesn't doing the bar first legal to go into one, and that was eighteen. So there you go. I mean took questions of that. Is so obviously popcorn and peanuts on a meal. But we're talking before. So I used to go to a bar's more of a bar than a restaurant. I think it had some tables, but I don't really know. For a fish fry. Yeah, right, so there would be people sitting at the bar, ordering at the bar. Often when you go to a bar restaurant it is sometimes faster, especially if you're one person, to get your meal at the bar. Absolutely you can't order a sandwich Zumio at the bar. There's no bar seating. Or do you block off every other bar stool? You know, again, I haven't been to a bar every long time to know this, but they're there have been in the in the previous week I take I walk through the Parks of Genese Valley Park a lot of kickball weeks back in action. HMM. So in the week after I noticed a kickball back in action one one night the numbers came out from the county. There were seven females and seven males in their s testing positive. Whose test came back positive a particular day? My question is kickball league, because when I walk by they're all sitting there with no mask. It's one ball. Yeah, I didn't tonice the ball being sanitized after everybody touched any and how how easily really does covid spread on a surface like that? So I think there's lots of things as we're reopening that we're learning about this. Someone and use the Cliche of building a plane while it's in the air. That really that is what I think the COVID response has been. Into some extent, I think that's what the response in our in a lot of the protests we're having is as well. We don't it's even though we've had protests, you know, fifty sixty years ago. They're different now because of the Times that we're in. And you you the protests are very closely tied to covid and the response to the protest is tied to Covid and we're trying to do the best we can. Yea, and incredibly uncertain. I'll go back to fearful. I'm not afraid to use that word. Fearful, scary, uncertain times and I would just like, I guess it would calm me down if more people would acknowledge, yeah, it's scary out there right now and let's all try to do what we can to acknowledge that. People are scared, not just stressed and worried, scared. Right. How can we? How can we accomplish? What do we want to accomplish? We want to keep people safe and healthy. We want equity, we want opportunity, we want fairness. As a name five things. I think you can ask everybody who's going to show up, who has shown up, and we'll show up at a protest if that's what they want. We can agree on that. How can...

...we do that without overly ratcheting up fear factors? Right? Yeah, Nope, I think I think you're absolutely right. It's this is kind of my takeaway from what bellow is trying to do, what governor Cuomo's trying to do, what lovely Warren is trying to do. It's you said it perfectly. It's all reactionary. It's reactionary to what's been happening and and we're we're in the myth of it. It's not it's not like it's. It may be coming, we're in it and we're trying to make it better or help help things, you know, get get better, not worse. So, okay, I heard some of the the fact that people are given about Maryor lovely Warren's thing about the curfew is like, okay. So. So in the curfew statement she said that the bars and restaurants can remain open past curfew, but gatherings still could not. You know, it would have to be ended after that. Is it nine pm? I believe it was. I can't thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Yep, so so, Selbil so, so what are you saying? That only in the black famborhoods that there's a curfew, but in the neighbors whether there's not African American population? That no, she's not. That's not that's not it, because there's there's bars and restaurants of a black community also, and also your yes, some of this is not a perfect answer to solve the gun violence, but she's got to do something right and and that's what's that's what she's trying to do. She's just trying to figure out something to curve some people are holding some protests, and I don't think here in Rochester, I don't believe, but at like one in the morning. Why are you prote who were you trying to protest against? That? One in the morning, everyone's clothes. Why are you doing it? Why you're holding a protests one morning. So so these are the things that you know we're trying to hey, why are you having large gatherings at late, at late at night when everyone's clothes? If you that usually the later in the evening the worst things tend to happen. It's just that's just how it is. So I think that's why she's doing that. I don't think there was any type of slight towards the Africanamerican communities here. I think she's just trying to get a grip on the rising gun violence that we've been seeing in the city. And again, I think the same thing is can be said about Cuomo. He's just trying to get a grip on the large gatherings and people not following the rules in the bars. These are not perfect reactions to what's happening, but they have to do something and, like you said, the planes of mid air and you're trying to build it. So you're kind of your kind of you're throwing hall Mary's here, trying to figure out what you want to accomplish. You know. Well, you know the Democratic minority. We'd have been spelled there. Issued a release after the mayor's the mayor's action and said that he supports it and know and his just strict has been. There have been streets in his district where some of these parties have taken place. Nothing good, in my experience, happens between the hours of two way and yeah, well, I think we're in the same page. They're right. Yeah, nothink, nothing good. So when I used to work at night, when I was in sports and at work night, you get out, you have your event, your game, whatever, and you're you know, occasionally we would go out for something after deadline, at one o'clock whatever. I kind of wanted to be home by thirty just because nothing good was going to happen after that. It's just it's just the way it is because for whatever reason you're not hearing about great things happening in the very early hours. Maybe there's alcohol involved, maybe there's anger involved, maybe there's other things involved in this that that make those, I think, difficult times if you're just out in about. Yeah, that's what and that's what they're trying to do. And any other thing too, is is people have to live in the neighborhoods where a house party is going on with a couple hundred people in it and those folks are have to get up in the morning. The mayor is asking for people to be responsible and to be thoughtful and to be respectful. Right, absolutely, absolutely, all right. That's all the time we have for this segment. Thank you so much, Patti, and I again I totally agree with you on all of that, because I do think people usually use the evening or the late nights the cloak or to hide the things that they're trying to do. Usually people don't do really bad things in broad daylight. There's a reason for that. So I a reread that. You know, we try to we want to keep the streets kind of clear late at night, because that's usually when the bad things happened. So thanks, thanks again, Patty, and again, if you do want to see those, help some more of those headlines with the full version of the for full versions of those headlines that you heard earlier in the show, you certainly can go to minority reporter dotnet and you can...

...see all those and, I said before, also please subscribe. It's definitely a good thing to support local journalism. Thanks again, Patty Matt my pleasure. All right, we'll do this again soon. All right, when I come back, we will talk, we have some final thoughts and talk about a little bit more about what's happening and some of the protests. Will right back. This is inside the mark. This is one hundred point nine FM, extreme independent radio, your urban alternative. I'm check, made along by DJ DJ ninety nine. I can live without my radio show, hiphop, RMB, independent autist. A hundred nine FM, W X I off Rochester, New York. You're listening to inside the margins on one hundred nine wx ir, extreme into dependent radio and Rochester's Urban Alternative Music Station. Welcome back, welcome back to inside the margins. Okay, this is the point of the show where I like to interject my final thoughts to end up the program and today my final thoughts are going to be in regards to the protest that happened that started at Mlk Park and end it at the four hundred and ninety. They're so I flip flopped a little bit on this. At first I'm like, man, I don't know, going out on a public highway, that's kind of you know, and then I kind of went back and forth. So here's my final thought process on this. I'm actually for it. I'm okay with what happened and I'll explain to you. I number one, everyone's like, well, it's you're breaking the law. Pedestrians are not allowed to be on the true way, and bikes and all types of things, you can't get them through way. Yes, I understand that. I understand that. You know you are violating small law there by walking on the expressway, which usually results in you being ticketed or just told to exit right. So, and cops have the discretion to give up those tickets or not. It all depends on safety protocols that they're willing to take. Also, don't forget, this is not the first time this happened, there was that Sel much to Montgomery marks that happened in sixty five. That actually Martin Luther King Jr was a part of. That was the march that was trying to bring awareness to voting and have black voters participate to try to get, you know, laws changed in the favor and their favor. And that was a fifty four mile route from Selma to the state capital of Montgomery. And everyone's confronted with deadly violence from local authorities and there are white vigilante groups and I think that's what people wanted to see to is it. You know, they were. They wanted people to be to be thrown off the expressway and and, you know, stopped and forced off. And you know, again, Martin Luther King was was a part of this. So everyone's like, all Martin Luke King would never do anything like this. He did, he was, he was a part of this, gets something that was just like this. And number three, and it comes to protesting in general, people will always tell you, hey, listen, I don't care what your protest against, but won't you do it where it doesn't inconvenience me? Right, go go to your little church, your little to your area and your backyard and protests where no one can see you, no one can hear you, and pretty much the only people that are aware of your protest or people that are protesting with you or people who actually kind of believe in what you're protesting for. Other than that, you're out of sight, out of mind, you're not bothering anybody and your exercising your right to protest. Well then, how do you get your message across? How does change happen when you do that? It doesn't. If you do stuff where you don't bother or inconvenience anybody and no one ever sees or hears you, then you're not doing anything for your movement. You have to do things where people are kind of forced to pay attention to what you're doing. And guess what? Today everyone's talking about it. Every radio station, every news program everyone's at least mentioning the protest that happened on I ninety. And also, no one was hurt, no one was arrested. And if you want to even be more, go down this road. anyways. The protests happened on a Sunday at two, not the busiest day of week. If you if you ask me. So I think that's so. That's something that worked out right. No one was hurt, no one was arrested, the protests went off and you should, and people are forced to pay attention to what you're doing, whether they agree with it or disagree with it, but that's our protest is done. That's why Kaepernick did what he did. That you don't just stand in front of your house and say I protest, or go to your church and protest in front of...

...your church just no one, how many people are driving by your church or how many people are going to pay attention? anyways. It's not how you do protest. You gotta you got to get your point across. People have to see it and guess what, it worked out. It's being talked about and the end result is no violence, no arrests. To me that's a win. Make sure you follow us on inside the margins radiocom you can get you can hear this episode in its entirety if you missed it, or any other previous episodes were also on I heart or wherever you get your podcasts, and you can also subscribe to us or submit any questions, comments or suggestions to us as well on our contact us button on the page and also you can emails directly at inside margins at GMAILCOM. All right, thanks for hanging out with us today. You will see you next Monday, right here or inside the margins. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. You're listening to one hundred nine FM, wxr R LP, in Rochester, New York. The whole of extreme and dependent radio. Find us at one hundred and nine wx ircom.

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