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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 29 · 2 years ago

Defund the Police?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode we discuss what the definition of defunding the police is and the effect it would have on local law enforcement.

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Well, hello and welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson, and there's a lot of talk still about the violence that's happening throughout the country. I believe there was a discussion on either Friday or Saturday about Washington and Washington was having some still having very bad problems with the violence and there are people that are calling for the National Guard, even though the mayor is trying to avoid that, to come in and stop that. So the question that we want to talk about today is the role that the police department does play and keeping everyone safe and what it really means to defund the police and what are we asking for when we do ask to have the police defunded. But before we do that, someone that I would never defund. In fact, I would throw more funds towards if the minority reporters. That is singer. Hello, Patty can. Okay, so now that everyone is heard, you say that, now you're on record, that I got to come up the pocket now. Huh, there you go. You got with a deep pockets and short on right. What the situation with that? Exactly, Alegant or ARBS? All right, let us let us get to the headlines and then we will we will get to our our discussion. Matt. Thank you. Further cuts are looming amid the Rochester City School district financial woes. Wait. Wait. The previous week, our CSD was informed by the state that it would receive twenty percent less in state funding, and that totals approximately one hundred twenty eight million dollars. Additionally, the superintendent, Leslie Myers Small, said that the district is facing cuts in food and transportation services funding. The district is implementing twenty percent budget reduction for all departments, staffing changes, implementing internal controls, reviewing the fiscal practices and commitments and creating new opportunities for what she calls greater financial oversight. In more our CSD news, they the district made the decision to switch to all remote learning for all grades based on the health and safety of students and staffs. We again Leslie Myers Small said that the decision of to go to all remote learning would be reviewed after ten weeks, which roughly coincides with the first marking period. Local leaders and community groups urge the city council to vote no to an rpd substation. However, council voted six to three to approve funding for the substation in the northeast part of Rochester. Council members Jacqueline Ortiz, Marylupian and Jose Po voted against the measure. Clean Hands, safe city. Downtown pedestrians have a way to fight covid nineteen artist Sean dunwoodie turned kiosk for the former pace bike share program into stands that hold hand sanitizer dispensers. They are there are several dispensers in the downtown area. Two of them are at the Transit Center and the goal of the repurposing was to help transit riders and people who use downtown to stay safe during covid black women played an integral role in the women's suffrage movement. Throughout the struggle for women's rights, black women were always in the trenches with white women and work just as tires tirelessly, despite facing greater opposition. Yet rarely have the efforts of black women shared the same spotlight as those of their white counterparts. Monroe County will root out pay in equity. Companies seeking to do business with the county will have to show that they have not violated equal pay laws within the past five years. According to an executive order signed August thirteen by county executive Adam bellow. The date of the order was no coincidence. August thirteen was black women's equal pay day, the approximate day a black woman's work into the current year to make what a white, non Hispanic man made at the end of the previous year. Two Thousand and ten census emitted three point seven million blacks, nearly five times it's original undercount claims. The concern is that, due to coronavirus and the sluggish response to the two thousand and twenty census, the count now underway could be on track for...

...the same or even worse undercounting results. In editorial, Reverend Michael Vaughan writes something to think about is race. The follow up, Juan writes about his application process to the race commission. He was not selected. However, there are much bigger issues to contend with in the selection of the commissioners. I'm happy that the lead politicians in this area have recognized the need for such a commission. He writes they are not castigating the police, nor are they saying that everything is fine. On the contrary, Vaughan Rights. They are taking an objective look at the state of affairs in this region and will make the necessary changes that are recommended by race that. Thank you so much, Pattie. As usual, and as I always tell you, if you want to get more of the stories that you just heard here in the headline news, why don't you go ahead and visit the minority reporter Dotnet and you can see the vote the full versions of all the stories that Patty just talked about also when you're there. Once you go ahead and take their opportunity to go ahead and subscribe to the minority reporter. Obviously we want to support local journalism and continue to support these stories that you feel that are important to you and your community. So go ahead and subscribe. The option will be there when you get to the website. You get the digital or the print version as well, and if you have any questions or if you have suggestions or story I ideas, you can send an email to editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And, as always, there are links to the minority reporter and you can hear this and all past episodes on our website on inside the margins. Radiocom all right, let's go ahead and talk about the funding the police. Were after this break. You're listening to inside the margins. Will be right back. Welcome back to inside the margins. I'm here with Patty singer from the minority reporter. Okay, Patty, so it's a pretty big topic, the defunding the police. We have an election coming up, obviously, and that's one of the things that's a sticking point on both sides. And regards to the police, and you know, the restructuring of the police depart partment. So there's a difference between restructuring and the funding, and what I want to talk about as the actual definition of what the funding means and what the result would be if we were to defund the police. And I guess it depends on how much we defund the police by two as well. So what's your insights on that, Patty. Well, I don't know that it's been. There is one definition of defund right. So coming up with a word. What's a word that we all can agree on? The definite to the definition of a bicycle. All right. I mean there are different versions of a bicycle, but when you say bicycle, I mean a racing bike, a mountain bike, you know, a kid started bike with training wheels comes to mind, right, but there's not a whole lot of different you you have the picture of a bicycle in your head. Yep, defund the police was what. I don't know what that looks like. I can remember when this took this conversation first started. We're talking a couple months ago. Rochester City Council President, Loretta Scott, said, I don't know what defund is. I don't know what that looks like. A restructure, rethink, reimagine that. She could, she could work with right, but the fun there wasn't. No, there's not a list of we're going to go line items and we're going to take this much from here and we're going to put it here now. The people who were protesting the substation that we just talked about, the headline on you know they're talking about money that should be used. Some of the people there, the protesters, talk about people have lost jobs, they've lost the ability to buy foods, issues with childcare and housing. Can can money go to that? The things when you get into municipalities and you get into bonds, you you can't take the money that you would use in a capital improvement such as a building, and take that money and use it for sometimes these things are called like, like soft purchases at that I'm being inelegant with the language, but money is devoted to capital funds to be used for capital purposes. And example, the city school district, in order to try to cut into its deficit, wanted to get a waiver so they wouldn't have to use ten million dollars a year in capital, excuse me, capital improve or a capital funds. They could put it to the deficit. They had...

...to get a waiver from city council to do that. Right, right, because you set up for for buildings and grounds and things like that. So it's similar in this situation. People will say, well, we should have more social workers, we should have more job fears, we should do more for the social service aspect, family needs, things like that. I don't think people are going to disagree with that. But the funding stream for police isn't always going to be the same funding stream. You can divert for something else. It's not like it's not like a river. You can you can build a damn or whatever and then divert the water someplace else. That's what's at. That's I'm going to say. It's not that simple. I just gave an incredibly complex and now would be. But but it's not necessarily a left pocket, right pocket kind kind of thing. So I think if you if you're thinking of taking money from police and putting it to social services, I think you are asking, you're having to change how your municipality advocates money and spends money. I think that's different from saying okay, we we don't want as many armed, you know, armed paramilitary something sometimes what I hear well on our streets. So can the budget, that is, can the I'm going to make up this number. It's a nice round number. All right, say it's fifty million dollars for a police department. No idea what police departments are, but that's will use that. Can we, instead of spending, we have to spend fifty million dollars on the police department. It's probably in what could be in our town charter, whatever it is. We don't have to buy fifty million dollars worth of guns and bullets, do we? Can we take some of that money and put it into different types of training? Can we use can we consider more victim advocates in our police department? Can we consider other type of ancillary services, more social workers working for the department? Can we be creative in how we shape our department? I think that is a reimagining as opposed to would defunding. Right, and he said Yep. Now I agree with that. So so here's my takeaways. And I was trying to find a point to argue with you on, but I don't think I have one because I'm kind of in total agreement with the pretty much what you said, because my thought is this. I think this emphasizes how important voting is, because what I think is you you would really want is to put somebody in place who would see the importance of mental health or trying to get people to help, who to get drugs or to try to get to try to, you know, divert poverty and and integration, more things, so people are there's not such a poverty and rich disparity, you know, levels. So I don't know if taking money away from the police and putting it somewhere is the ideal solution. I think it's more of making sure the things that need to get funded actually do get funded and take the things that you want to do better and the police department and focus the, like you said, the funds that you already get for the police on those. So, but you said it perfectly, instead of buying a bunch of bullets and more armor, you can use that money to properly train the the police officers for certain situations and instead of, you know, pulling a gun out and potentially shooting someone who's unarmed and going through what we've been going through for the last few months, we can you can figure out better ways to to avoid that kind of situation and, as we discussing before and weeks ago in another ship shows the body cams and and you know, people maybe being hired to review that footage. That those kind of things, I think would be more beneficial than trying to just take the money away. I definitely think there are issues that do need to be resolved, but I don't know if actually, you know, taking money away is is what is needed. I mean, again, if it's a fat cat police department, that we should look at that. If if they're bank rolling then yeah, that's a whole different story. But if it's already a police department that's struggling with with funds, I don't know if taking their money away is going to make the situation better. A couple things. So everybody's going to be struggling with money...

...because of covid were just set a state. That state is cutting it's a twenty percent to school districts. So everybody's going to be struggle with money. Money, money's going to be tight every, everywhere, and that's something that people need to to to come to grips with. Whether it's your own your family budget or your municipalities budget, money is going to be tight. It's not going to be a lot to throw around. So a couple months ago the governor issued an edict that police departments in the communities would reimagine policing for the for the twenty one century. So he says that in police departments and the municipalities will have to come up with a plan or they could they could potentially lose their state funding. Sure that's going to be a varying amount depending on police departments, and I had one police chief told me that it really wasn't in the scheme of things. The money they got from the state wasn't a lot and the grants team of things. So was that chief saying, you know, HMM, we're all we'll do our plan because we have to do the plan, but foot holding the money isn't is it the with hope potentially with holding money? Is it the reason we should do this plan? To do the plan because it's the right thing to do, not because we may lose you know, I don't know. A hundred thousand dollars, which you mean? That's a lot of money in the scheme of a municipal budget. Was Not a lot of money. You're not. Last week the governor issues some more guidance and he is talking about he wants these plans that to be developed through an inclusive process. There are more than five hundred law enforcement agencies in the state and the Governor says there is no quote, one size fits all, unquote solution. However, he wants to your rebuild police community relations. Each local government must convene stakeholders for a fact based and honest dialog about the public safety needs of their community. Each community must envision for itself the appropriate role of police. Policies must be developed to allow the police to do their jobs to protect the public, and these policies must meet with the with the local communities acceptance. So So, if I'm an advocate for defunding the police and I'm sitting at a table with an advocate for I want a robust, well trained police force, how will we going to where are we going to meet on that? Because people were coming from, in my opinion, fundamentally divergent points of view. The Governor Rights that collaborative is the key word. It would be a mistake to frame these discussions as an adversarial process or an effort to impose top down solutions. I think the adversarial boat is sailed to be to be honest with you, I think we are adrift in Adversarial Waters Right now. Issues must be aired, but solutions must be crafted. So, according to the governor, the collaborative process needs to review the needs of the community, established policies that allow police to effectively and safely perform their duties, involve the entire community in the discussion, develop recommendations resulting from the review, offer a plan for public comment. Was that the plan to the local legislative body to ratify or adapt it and do this all before April one, two thousand and twenty one. So what's going to happen in East Rochester? Probably different than in Brockport, different than in Rochester, and so no one size fits all solution and there shouldn't be. And that's true. But I'm not a black man, not black woman. I think I would like, however, the police agencies in my region to be consistent. So if I'm driving down commercial street in East Rochester and then I'm driving down main street in rockport and then I'm on Clinton Avenue in Rochester, personally me, I would kind of like, because I can go to all these places within I get to all of them in fifteen minutes, right. I would kind of like to know that the police departments are on the same page here. How going to be treated the same way? Yeah, so well, there's no one size fits all solution. I don't want different treatment in these Rochester...

...and I'm getting rockport. Oh, don't forget the Monroe County Sheriff's Office when I go driving through Rida. No, I I get that and I agree with that too, and I don't think there should be different laws per se, you know, jaywalking crime and Brockport, as a different penalty for Jaywalking and Brockport than there is for the city of Rochester. I don't think that is what I I hear, or in that I hear something like Hey, okay, so there's a really big opiate crisis and let's say Batavia, so perhaps they'll do more, they'll focus more on that and maybe even put extra funds or extra resource sources towards trying to resolve that solution in Batavia, whereas in Brockport it's not as much the problem. So they're for they're focusing and their resources are going to be on different things, because each community is going to have different issues that are, you know, hindering or hurting them that they may want to focus more on. So I think that's how we should look at that. And, by the way, I do want to say this. I think we were ahead of the curve because I think, I believe months ago and whenever episodes we were talking about a good way to establish a good relationship with police and the community as more community involvement. We were talking about integration and trying to how to prosper persuade more minorities to becoming police. We had an episode that we talked about that. So I think this is a great move. I think the way that you do re establish a strong relationship between the the police and the actual people who live in the city is to make sure you have them involved and what's happening. You don't gets all of a sudden send out a notice that, hey, by the way, today this is happening and you got to deal with it. You gotta, you know, have meetings, talk to the community, see what they want, see what their problems are and try to work to resolve those problems instead of just being in the table as a law and order type deal. I think that's where there were. The problem is because if it's always just law and order, then it's like hey, you moved, you got shot, that's your problem and that should not be the the solution. There should be a discussion of hey, listen, we don't want to hurt you, we don't want to shoot you, we don't want this to happen. So how can we avoid this from being from happening again, and how can we understand one another, because some, because not all, obviously not all police officers are are like the ones who shot or kneel dot that shot, I'm sorry, who kneel down George Floyd's neck or or shot Brianna Taylor or anything that. Not all police officers would have acted that way. So how can we get the police officers to act in accordance around the globe or around multiple cities? You know what I mean. So I mean the key is training. So absolutely one of the departments in Monroe County is working on training module and it was it was shared with me and I was was watching some of the so of the videos on it, and one of the videos is of an officer who is he encounters a person on the highway which is walking on the highway and you know, what are you doing here? What's going on? How can I help you? Wherever? And then the man displays a weapon. So they're on the side of the highway. It's not here, it's somewhere in the Midwest. Okay, but this is an interstate. This can go wrong. How many ways. It long story short, the nobody ends up dead. That's always a good outcome. Weapons are our fire. They they had. I do believe there's there's one shot that is fired to the the individual, the civilian, or who, however you want to describe this person, perpetrator, whatever, who is who is brandishing a weapon at police officer. But most of this video is the officer screaming at this person, I do not want to shoot you, please put the gun down. What's going on? I mean screaming to this person to do this. And then the person is part of the interview, you know, afterwards, the officers part of the interview afterwards saying that I never knew I would be famous for not shooting somebody. So it's incredibly powerful. Now I'll get to training. In a second kind of discussion the other day with me about what is...

...good training. Anyway, we talked about this a couple weeks ago. I really urge listeners to go to the city of Rochester Web site year. So city of Rochester dot go or just or just google what what I did to get there, which was join the Rochester Police Department. City of Rochester. Go to that link. You can take a practice test. There's lots of things as you scroll down and you you can read about medical standards and and all kinds of things, but there'll be a link here. And of course, now the pressures on me, Matt, where on Live Radio here? I can't find it, but the officer study guide that you can look at. I would I would urge people who truly want to have a discussion about what the new police force should look like to read that manual, the police officers study guide, and take the test. There's a practice test that you can take. One of the things, one of the things you're tested on is facial recognition. Somebody disguises themselves a bald man, it puts on a WIG, or somebody with hair shaves and you've got to pick out who this person is. And I think this is instructive because I think all of us, and you never use the words all and never always very dangerous, but I do want to think that that ninety nine percent of us want to know that we are safe in our homes, in our streets to or from work, on about our daily business. Who is going to provide that safety for us? Social Workers, counselors can help with that. But ultimately I believe it is a well trained police force and training is definitely the key to this. Training may have to change over time with what the needs are. And Training is not box checking. It is not at roll call showing a video for fifteen minutes and saying, Hey, guys, got that all right, let's move on. That's not training. Sending somebody a powerpoint, watching a powerpoint, reading the slides to somebody on a powerpoint is not training. That is checking a box. We need training, not checking boxes. Realize, YEP, real, actual, the soapbox, so I don't sprain my ankle or tear my yeah, but these are the things, I think that we need to have these discussions on and, as the governor is talking about, what these should be and how we reach consensus and how we collaborate. What do we want? A safe community. I think everybody's going to want that. Is there anybody who does not want to safe community? Raise your hand. It's radio. I can see you. What did safety look like? How do we get there? Right, Nope, I safe. Is it somebody with a gun and lots of bullets? Is it somebody who is skilled with negotiation, in D escalation? Can Somebody who has a gun in a lots of bullets also d escalate something? Or does that have to be always somebody WHO's not on? I don't know the answers to these questions, but basically, this community has into April first, no fooling to figure it out. That is not a long time when you dealing with covid you're dealing with how we're going to teach our kids in school and you're dealing with with what a crisis everything April one is how many months away? Not that far at all. Not that far at all. You know before I make a comment. So obviously you were looking through my facebook pictures. Bald man with the WIG, I get it anyways. So I didn't want to make I did want to make this comment because this to me, is always very interesting. One of the complaints that even I have said in the past it's that it's hard for people to be happy working somewhere or being at school somewhere or doing anything when they don't see themselves represented. So you know, you ought we always advocate for diversity in schools, diversity in teachers, diversity in the workplace. Right, there's always talk about that, but for some reason for a long time, and I won't say for some reason. I understand why there's...

...a stigma there, but there's a stigma on police. So because there's a stigma on police, it's not the most popular job that African Americans want to go for, which I think on that. Now I know this this may be an unpopular opinion on a show like this, but I think that's a mistake because if you want people who can share your experiences, who know about things that you may have gone through in your life as an African American, wouldn't you want that representation in your police force as well, because they understand the community the way you understand the community? So you may want to see more representation as far as diversity in your your police department. And again, I know there's a stigma, especially if you listen to music. Hip Hop has a lot, a lot of anti cop music, and I again I totally understand. There's a history of bad things that have happened when it comes to the police and African Americans, and go back to the s and the Rodney King thing and all that. There's a whole bunch and the La riots back then. There's a whole bunch of bad things that have happened. So I get it. I understand why there's a stigma there. But if you want that to change, if you want the police department to be being more reflective of treating you the way that you would want to be treated because you are a minority, when to be I guess it would make sense to have more minorities in the police department. Would you agree with that statement? I would agree and I also want I also want my police department to be educated. I would like them to have bachelor's degrees. Right. Agree, absolutely, Paddy. I agree. You know, college is not to be all end all. I think I get that and a lot of people are not cut out for college and a lot of people, I who sat in my college classroom shouldn't have been there, but they were. That is not the route for everybody. That being said, college, some kind of post secondary education, Post Secondary Training, teaches you to think and teaches you or encourages you to be your lifelong learner. I think what I want from my police officers is someone who has a background in a variety of different topics, different situations, has shown the ability to be able to learn, to be able to think, to be able to process information, sometimes very quickly, sometimes under pressure, because that is what they are, and I think that comes with a level. I think to be a good officer, good police officer, you need you need to be able to know how to learn, and that is what education teaches us. That we are, that we have, we have demonstrated that we can, that we can learn, and post secondary education demonstrates that a little bit more. Not for someone who to hold different kinds of learners. I get that you shouldn't only just have, you know, Bachelor of arts or Bachelor of science candidates the police officers. However, I don't all the back this. I want my police officers educated because that is going to help them deal with situations, because they will have more knowledge to draw upon. Right. I. Nope, I agree with that. And yes, Daddy and I and maybe a little biased because we both have higher educations, but she's. I agree with you absolutely in the first step of you said. I I honestly don't think that everyone had an in the world and their life has to have a college degree, because there are so many things you can do without one. And you, like you said, I've worked on college before to not everyone is cut out for that. It's it's not a slip on anybody, it's just sometimes that's just not the path that's right for you, and I get that. I'm not saying that you need everyone needs to go to school and have a college degree. I'm not pounding that table whatsoever, but I do agree with I would prefer someone who has that ability to continuously learn while they're in uniform, because you need to have that because things change, things don't just stay the same. So you need to have that that mindset. I wanted to bring this to your attention. To Tad to go that people were invited to be on a police force because they knew somebody. All, you seem like a good fit for the job. Oh need a job, why don't you come and be a policeman?...

I would prefer a professional police force which has which has to go through standardized training, whether or not you have a, you know, a college degree, but there is standardized training, there is a standardized test that you have to take score a certain amount, versus Oh, Yo Joe, you want to be on the police force or your brother in law needs a job. That was done decades ago. That, to me, is a is a situation that is right for far more abuse. Professionally trained workforce that has to meet certain standards and when those standards are not met there is discipline all the way up to termination. Right what I want? I want professionals. I agree with that. The last thing I wanted to say and then we'll probably have to take a break, but I did want to say this. It's I want to make sure that everyone understands that I am well aware of the issues that are out there. I've got we've talked about this before, Patty there. I've been pulled over, I've had some mistreatment by police in my life, so I'm not always happy about how things are done and there has been a lot of bad things that are that have happened with police. But violent crime is real and they're there is going to always be a violent criminal. Unfortunately, that is a fact of life. There's going to be someone out there who is going to want to do harmful things to people and a social worker or a mental health expert or an anti drug department, unfortunately, is not going to be able to stop that person from committing that violent crying or get that person off the street. We will require some type of law enforcement to take care of that for us. So I've seen two types of protest. I've seen the the fund the police protest and I've even seen the abolish police protest. To the protests that's say the fund the police, I can at least understand them, and that's those are the ones where we should sit down and talk and figure out exactly what we want. When you say the fun police, but when you say abolish police, I have to disagree with you. There's no way that we could function without some sort of law enforcement. There is. There is an initiative that most of them a row count I think all of the Monroe County police agencies, including the sheriff's department and the towns that have police, use the forensic in it, the fifteen forensic intervention team. When there is a call that will involve that that either the caller or responding officers believe is a involves a mental health component, they can call a trained mental health counselor who was part of this fit team to calm a system on the call. This exists now in Monroe County. So people say, Oh, we need mental health calls. We don't have this exists and I don't have the figures right in front of me, but but ourpd has been the highest user of this service since its inception of probably about ten months ago, maybe a little bit longer, and Little County Sheriff is second and Gates Police Department was third because Gates police has a very active victim advocate who uses this this fifteen frequently. So other other agencies have access to this. So in the city also has a family intervention team that's called the fact team. I can't remember what the acronym is, what every letter is. But again for family disputes where there may be some kind of emotional element to the reason for the call, they're dispatched with officers. So this is happening. So we people saying it's only police ever fonding and we shouldn't respond to mental health calls. They there is an alternative for them and they are collaborating with mental health professionals on these calls. It's existing. It's been written about it. I don't know. Maybe they need better pr for it. I'm not I'm not sure, but these things are are happening. They need to happen more probably, they need to have to need to dispatch them...

...more together, perhaps, but if we defund or we abolish the police, are there enough trained mental health providers to fill in? Oh and, as somebody from the police told me, and remind them, we work twenty four hours a day, seven days a week. Right, right. So things are part of the discussion. Nothing right now should be off the table. Right on this book discussion. It has to be a discussion. It did to me. The yelling has to stop. It's time to talk about this. Figure out where we want to be. I had an editor once, very wise, who would say where do you want your story to end? And come back, work backward to get there. What do we want to safe community? What does that look like to you? Now, okay, let's build that. Right and as we both have said before, and I think I think we've said of a multiple shows, I will never stand against protesting because the way we got women's rights, the way we got African America American rights, the way we got civil rights, the way we got rights for all types of different communities and marginalized group, marginalized groups and the Lgbtq community is by Pearl testing. You have to do that and there's nothing wrong with that. And I'll stand next to people and protest for things that I strongly believe in. But unfortunately some people are violent. It's just the way it is. It's I wish I could, I wish everyone didn't want to be violent, but there are people out in the world who will be violent and we need people that can handle those kind of people and, as you said before, a mental health person probably isn't the best fit to handle somebody who wants to, you know, do do harmful things to people. You know, if it need to be, if he's having a mental issue, that's a whole different story. But someone wants to put a mask on and shoot up the place, you got to have someone who's who was able to stop that, and you know. So we can't remove, we can't take take away all of law enforcement. Just hope that doesn't happen, because it's going to happen. But but we do need change. Things do need to be changed. We do need to reevaluate what our police department should look like, and that's what where you're absolutely right, Patty. We should talk, we should sit down and talk about it and figure out exactly how we want our law enforcement to look going forward and while we look at law enforcement, even though you know that's the mandate now, and this is, I think, what the what the race commission, racial instructural equity is looking at, is also looking at. What are our other systems that are that are contributing to that? What a war? What's education and Housing and all these things come come together. It's not right now. The focus is on is on police, and I think you have to break into that circle somewhere and start someplace. But I think we also need to look holistically and how does POW does policing, fit into the other aspects of our society and also, you know, take a look at our own individual actions and how do we relate to somebody that doesn't necessarily look like users or think like us? Absolutely, Patty, you always bring a lot to the table when it comes to these kinds of discussion, so I always appreciate you. So thank you so much, Patti. Thank you, Matt and, as I said earlier, don't forget make sure you visit the minority reporter and check out all the head line news that Patty was talking about earlier so you can get the full versions of those stories and also, please go ahead and subscribe while you're there. We need to support our local papers. They tell the stories that you want to hear. They represent your community. So go ahead and please subscribe when you get a chance. Thanks so much, Patty. Let's go ahead and take a break. Will be right back with some final thoughts right here on inside the mark. Welcome back to you inside the margins. Okay, some final thoughts. So, between the hours of three o'clock pm yesterday and about one am this morning, there were five shootings. Five shootings too, we're at a large party. One ended up fatal. So why am I bringing this up? Well, as you know, I've been an advocate for the black lives movement. I still am, still always will be. I definitely believe that we still need to fight to make sure that we are treated fairly and...

...treated equally to anyone else when it comes to being questioned or apprehended by the police. Always be an advocate of that, but this is proof that there's something going on right. And, above all else, I want not only for us to be equal and fairly treated, but I also want to feel safe, not for myself primarily, but for my children. So safety is definitely paramount and that's why we're wearing masks, that's why we're socially distancing, because we want to be safe during this crisis. So that's why I said earlier. You know, I have also had some issues with police in my past, being pulled over just because of the color of my skin. That's my assumption, because there will be no other reason for some of the things that we're done or some of the questions that were asked of being plus, when a cop tells you I'm not racist, my best friend is black, that usually gives you a reason to believe that. That's probably the exact opposite. However, I don't believe we need to abolish the police. See, there's two movements going on and and there's one that I do agree with. We definitely need more training, we definitely need to restructure how things are done. We definitely need to make sure that we have a diverse police department. We definitely need to make sure that things are being done so we can so we don't keep running into these same problems that we had been running into since African Americans have been brought over to this country pretty much. So I get that and I'm with that, and hack even if it does come to moving funds around, I probably support that too. But I've also been to I've been to both the protests. I've been to protest that talk about the funding police. I been to the just stract standard black lives matter protests and I've actually seen one that actually did say abolish the police, and that one is the one that I cannot support. Listen, just being honest here. I'm not that I'm not trying to derail anyone's boom because, again, I stand in unity. I want the city to be better, but there is always going to be crime. It doesn't matter if you get rid of poverty, doesnt matter of everyone's wealthy, doesn't matter if you actually go ahead and spearhead mental health issues. There are just some people out there that will just commit crimes just because that's what they want to do. If they were not red lights for people to stop when they're supposed to stop on their driving, people would just drive and they would not care about you or your right away. That's just how it is in life and we need law enforcement for even those minut reasons, like traffic laws. Do you imagine if people just ran red lights or didn't stop as stop signs how many accidents they would be if that happened you self. Policing is a great idea, but we know that sometimes it's not going to work. People don't believe there's going to be some sort of, you know, punishment for doing things that are wrong. They they won't see why they can't do things wrong. It's just the way it is. And again, I don't want to sound like I'm a Nassay of anything, cause I'm not. I believe that we can make things better. But I believe that we can, but we also need to see the truth that just abolishing police is probably not the best thing in the world. We definitely need to have conversations, we definitely need to sit down. Things definitely need to change. I don't believe in the end the statement that people say, well, just a few bad apples. No, there's been a problem for a very long time. So things definitely need to change. It's not just a few bad apples, but we can't abolish the police. The five shootings and just a few hours kind of let you know that that's that, that's the kit. That's the case. Mary will be warns taking heat because she's trying to crack down on the partying that happens at night, the gatherings, and this is the reason, because sometimes bad things happen late at night and she's trying to not only stop the spread of sickness by the gatherings at night, but also trying to stop the violence that's happening at night. You can't have it both ways. It's hard. So this is what I say. This is this is, I guess, what I want to end up saying. We need to work together instead of dividing, being so divisive right now,...

...because until we come to some sort of understanding with one another, I don't think there's any end in sight for what's been going on, because I think what has happened is we've gotten to the point where we've said it's enoughs enough, we're not going to stand for it anymore. But then some people decide to go across that line. Yes, definitely stand for what you believe and tell people that we're not going to take it anymore, but we can't just go with law on it, lawlessness either. We have to do things the right way. People aren't going to listen to us, they're going to portray us in a negative light and we'll never get to where we want to be. So protest, stand up for what you believe in, but try not to include by links in them. Thank you for listening to inside the margins. It's Matt Wilson and I'll see you next week. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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