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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode · 2 years ago

Covid Contraction disproportion

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We talk Covid contraction disproportion within the communities in Rochester 

Inside the margins is sponsored by salvators. I just took a DNA test. Turns out I'm a hundred percent Rochester. That's right, I got seven Hundredzero matches. We are all COUGIE's. I can't wait to shake your hand. Oh wait, I can't, but I can feed you. salvators famous full and you touchless delivery of those the COM marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Hello and welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson, and we survived Thanksgiving. Obviously, the numbers, the full numbers on what has happened as far as cold it with things giving, aren't necessarily available yet. Once they are, well will happily talk about those, but we'll see exactly if people did actually try to stay home and not spread or if people just disobeyed and just did whatever they want to do. I'm sure those numbers will be available in the future and we'll we'll discuss those when those are but we still have another big holiday coming up, which is Christmas and also New Year's. We kind of touch on that last week. We may talk about the again later on during this show and also we're going to talk about covid numbers if there's a disparity in those numbers within the population in the city, and we'll go ahead and talk about that coming up later on the show. But before we go ahead and start there, let me go ahead and bring in someone who I have no disparities with. I don't know if they would make sense. It's the minor reporters, patty singer. Good afternoon, Patty, and we're another way. It's just spinning, Spinning, Spinning right again. Hopefully we are the highlight of your Monday. We try to be highlight of mind matts. We have a lot to talk about today. So news that the minority reporter has reported on. The Mayor, lovely Warren, says the city cannot stop a fiction process, but it does offer resources for tenants. How will the airport teach about Frederick Douglass? The name change is only part of what the airport will be doing to honor the abolitionist. Retired Urban League leader William Clark was appointed to the Rochester City School District Board of Education. The Black and Asian Democratic Caucus of Monroe County legislature has made recommendations for the proposed budget. Budget deliberations are underway and the full legislature is scheduled to vote on the budget on December eighth. The Rochester City School district is eyeing the third quarter to bring all students back in a hybrid of learning model. Help wanted. The covid nineteen pandemic is stressing the Monroe County Health Department. Fire did not extinguish the Thanksgiving spirit at a community food covered. The city is adjusting its services and seeks more test as the state raises the alert over microclusters. The National News, Biden's first one hundred day challenge is transitioning to a more inclusive economy and despite an apology from Wells Fargo CEO, African Americans still face, quote, and uphill battle, unquote, for respect and in opinion and editorial George Payne has a proposal for how best to use Barack Obama in the Biden Administration and mark the hope writes about senior moments that thank you so much, Patty, as always. And as always, if you want to get the full versions of those headlines Stories that you just heard Patty talk about, you can...

...go ahead and visit the minority reporter dotnet. The full versions of those stories are there. You will also have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter and again, I have a subscription to it because I like to get my local journalism from sources that tell stories that matter to me. So that option is there for you as well and we obviously hope that you take the advantage of that option. And also, if you have any questions or comments, or if you have any suggestions or show ideas for us, you can certainly submit that those questions to myself or Patti or the minority reporter for the for, you know, stories for them to cover. You can submit your questions to editor at minority reporter Dotnet, you know, to see if they can, you know, look at what you have that you want to have talked about also to us here at inside the margins at gmailcom or myself at Matt Wilson at inside the margins radiocom and also if you have missed any episodes of inside the margins, you can catch them on our website, which is, of course, inside the margins, Radiocom, and also the replayers are available as a podcast on ihearntcom and wherever you get your podcast. All right, in the news, Covid is always in the news, and we're going to talk about that more because that's what we have to do. Unfortunately, that will be right back. This is inside the margins. All right, welcome back to inside the margins. I'm here with Patty, and Patty First Up, before we even get to our topics, I have to apologize to you because I I let Patty know be later than I let all of you know. We have a new sponsor for our show. It is salvators. So if you go to Sellatorscom you can find any location that's close to you and also you can find out how to purchase any food if you are interested, because they do have to lucious food. But, Patty, we have a sponsored by the way, I just want to let you let you know that we have. Thanks. Like no, I have to switch my pizza place to support on wants. We know that. Yeah, yeah, still love you. I love you right back. Yeah, that was that was it. That was a slip of my thought, for I was excited, excited they sponsored. It's I forgot. The first person I should have called was patty. So on the air live I'm saying to you, Patty, I apologize. Now. The first person is your wife. The second first, well, he has to listen to you all the time. It's true. All right, let's get back to our topics. That's want to make sure everyone knew that salvators proudly sponsors inside the Marge's radio, which is great. Appreciate them. So thank you, thank Yep, we certainly do. All right. So, Patty, of course we cannot escape it. Covid is still in the news and it will be in the news until things calm down, which obviously we saw some time for that to happen. So there was a story that I briefly looked at and I know that you looked at as well, and I want to kind of talk and talk to that a little bit. It's in regard to the disparity of Covid and regards to the black community and also the other communities, and it was showing. Now I don't know if the numbers are have been updated. I know that you looked at some more recent numbers, but it showed that black Rochesterians had contracted the coronavirus at three times the rate of white people, the white population, I'm sorry, and that the reason for that is because that they actually worked more in the frontline jobs. Those groups would include things like grocery stores and Public Transit and health and child care. That was kind of more of the reason why that was happening, not not because of the poverty issue, and I just want to see I don't know if you saw that whole story or what your input was on that. Well, that's that's sort of old news. I mean we've had that. Yeah, they were about that for quite a while...

...and it was there are. There were a lot of factors to that. And what's interesting isn't in the coming days and weeks, the the real rapid response team, which is the city, which is the black positions net network, like nurses network, coming out with some plans that they're going to talk about addressing disparities and what's what's interesting is the number that disparity seems to be shrinking. If that's the best way to say okay, closure. Yes, I took a statistics course in Grad school. Yes, I passed it. You know, after I I covered baseball for many years. So bad average and earn earn run average. That's kind of where my stats stopped on basically say fugging percentage. I never could handle. But they made up stats as they went along. So anyway, so we'll go all of these numbers and will say I'm a bunch of time. So you can do your own math at home. So the Center for Community Health and Prevention, which is part of the University of Rochester Medical Center, is doing the counties data surveillance and they are looking at data such as and I've got it up in front of me here. So they look at hospitalization rates by week, total cases, total hospitalizations. They look at it for age group by week. Okay, they they really they slice and dice this. One of the things that they do is they look at age adjusted rates by race, ethnicity and gender. What sex they do only do as far as gender goes, they only do male and female. They do not do non binary. Gotchas. Now the county, every day that the county puts out the cases reported that day, they will do. They will list if it's blank, they will list if it's non binary. So you this. You have. Our data is just male female. The numbers that are identifying as non binary are very small in the daily county reports for the cases. So I don't know that it would make a big difference in reporting the data. But I just say that because we have a data set, it's doing to it of two different data sets doing two different things, right. s being in full to sculduer. So yeah, totally everything. At three times number was earlier in, earlier in the pandemic in the spring, there was, you know, and there's still is a difference. There's still is more black and Latino than there is white. But that three times no number was very early on. So take out your pencils and math. It's math time. Will not be a quiz. What a rate the to to know about this. Okay, so preliminary data as of October twenty one had the age adjusted rate per one hundredzero population. And this is a way just to just to make sure we got apples and apples and we have golden delicious versus Golden Delicious, right. So we want to make sure we're preparing the same thing. So they go age adjusted right, thousand population. All you folks were better in stats than I am. I Apologize Having said that because you already know that. I just felt I wanted to hear myself say. It's a lot'm understanding. So for a white six hundred thirty one cases per hundredzero, African Americans, one thousand eight hundred twenty one, Latino, one three and eighty four, Asian four six. Okay, now, okay, so, so, so in in that in October we have about three times the amount of African Americans versus whites, right,...

...and we have about two times a number of Latino, right right, because we have whites at thirty one, African Americans at eighteen twenty one latino at one thousand three und eighty four. So if we're comparing to white, who got three times as many African Americans, twice as many Latino, don't white. So let's jump to November eighteen, when the recent data has come out. Right, white age adjusted rate per one hundred thousand population, one thousand two hundred and fifteen, African Americans two thousand two hundred eighty four, Latino, one thousand nine hundred and seven, Asian one, three four nine. Now, this is not a run number, this is age adjusted per hundred thousand. Right. Right. So people joining in on this. I want to repeat that. It's not like only twenty two hundred African Americans have covid no, the per hundred thousand population. Right, looking at that. The big jump. Right. Where is whites? Yes, at my bad math and your bad math. Right, county from they were from six thirty one per hundred thousand to twelve fifteen. That's almost doubles, just about double, right. Right. So blacks went from eight hundred and twenty one to two thousand two eighty four. That's about twenty five percent increase. Yep. And Latino there's about a third more cases in that month. So and Asian would be nine hundred forty six to thirteen forty nine. I'm going to say that's maybe, but another third more among among Asians. Thirty percent, four percent more in that group. Just kind of eyeballing that. So and this is what I'm going to try to pursue this week. So hopefully I'll get answers to this and we can talk about next weeks. I was just looking at these, at these numbers, because I was curious as to have been a while since the diversity had put out these numbers. I just saw them. So I've been thinking about it. Haven't had a chance for me to call anybody and and talk to them. What is happening? What message it would appear to me there is the message the protector circle. Message is getting through in the minority community. That my voice is going up. I'm asking you as a question because I don't have the answer right. And what message is not getting through in white community? Yeah, no, that that's an excellent point, because you're yeah, right now we're at we're at the speculation phase, is we don't have the hard Detta to see why there's an upward turn. Obviously I haven't talked to people in the black positions network to talk to see the starch in the city with the real rapid response team. They're going to have something coming out soon about, you know, some things that have been going on. But just looking at this map, just you and I talking about it and people listen. Yes, the numbers in the African American community are still higher, but they're hired at a slower rate. Yep, right. What does that mean? What is what is happening. Right, you're exactly right that the numbers are still going up, which, if you if you check the data that the years provided, numbers are going up in all categories for every day. So everyone's seeing an increase. Where's the problem? Yeah, so, yeah, right, right, and you're in. You're right, obviously, because covids getting worse period you're going to see an increase with everyone, but there is a drastic increase within the white population. Now, I know we have covered the topic of covid fatigue before and I also and again, like I said, we don't dive into politics and I still I still don't like to, so I still try to avoid it.

But I know that there's a message from their is still a message from a certain you know group. I guess you could say that masks don't really work and, you know, we should open up everything. So I wonder if that message is getting through stronger in a different demographic than is in another demographic. If you've gonnerstand on trying to say that measures y'ull going the outgoing administration. Is that wature? Yea absolutely correct right, right going, but however you want to phrase it. All right. So there were one of the things that had been early in the pandemic. That was an issue. Why there were more minority why there were more black and Brown people with covid M, frontline workers, people who could not work at home, you know, in in healthcare, needed public transportation and all the things that seemed to be separating. You know, folks, at that time there wasn't testing in the communities. There was a there was a whole. Those communities just seemed to be left behind the beginning of this. So there may not even been a true sense of the number of cases in that community. Could have even been worse. We don't know. Now that there is more widespread testing and there was more testing done in that community, are they are they finding that the radio sort of settled? Settled down, if that makes any sense. No, but does it? Does you know we first went in, oh my gosh, no, we're testing and look at all these cases. Now that testing in the black community has been more regular, thanks to the rapid response team and other organizations that have helped do that, are we getting more predictable numbers in a sense that we know what's what's happening? They were getting a better picture of it. There's still you know my arts that they're still frontline workers. They're still working and I see more black workers and I do white workers in the convenience store I go to when where I get my gas. I mean, so that hasn't changed. What is it that is change that has slowed that rate of increase and yet increased made a fast rate of increase in another group, it being it's going to be interesting to ask that question and to get answers from people who monitor this a heck of a lot more closely than I do and who understand the numbers better than I do. Yeah, no, I'm looking forward to see what what the in the research turns up. As far as why those that, because you're right, we can we consider a speculate all day. I have my own thoughts of possibilities of why that is. I'm sure you have your own thoughts as well, but I think when the numbers come out in the research is done, it kind of it'll kind of at least give us guidance as to why that is. There's a there's tons of things that go through my mind. You know, maybe it's the maybe the same people who were working in the front lines are still there. So those numbers kind of dwindle, not dwindled, but aren't seeing as a drastic increase because we're it's the same people that are on the front lines in the African American community. We're not being not seeing new people doing it. I'm not sure. I don't know. I don't have the answers that. I'm sure you don't either, but you know, it's it is interesting. It's certainly interesting to see those numbers and see just by October, no November comparison, that the dramatic change and the increased numbers through the ethnic class the ethnic backgrounds. So let's look at gender. So in in October the age adjusted rate for men was eight hundred and two to one thousand three hundred sixty seven. Hmm Wow. Women were one thousand and forty nine, and that is up to one thousand six hundred and thirty eight.

So again I mean a lot more, a lot and it's hard to know if these are white men. Black man would but men and white look like that, look like they are drivers of this. Let's look at some some other things. I like in water hospitalizations. Those numbers again are up. African Americans, black still lead in the age adjusted rate for hospitalizations. Right, in fact, for for the white or yet why? Whites are up as well, not as not as much, but I mean we're up across the board, but there are significant is a tough word when you're talking about the statistics because it has a certain meaning. There are catching. There you go, I catching increases right, no, you I catching noticeable whites and the and the increases among Africans, African Americans and Latino has. We're still expecting those to be higher based on what we've been dealing with for what six or seven months now. So it's not a surprised that those are higher, but that increases is is narrowing and the increase in in whites is, like I said, I catching right. Yeah, it is. It certainly is. And, like I said, I guess for some reason in the back of man, I think that that that fatigue and also the thought process behind the administration that is outgoing may play a lot into that. I just again that's just in the back, lad it's not fact, just that my thought processes. That is that yet, but that because we'll look at okay, so we'll look at deaths among whites again in the October data, age adjusted. Right, rate for whites was twenty nine point five. That is up to thirty three M and among blacks that rate is down, seventy seven point two to six point three. Among the Tino that rate is down, and among Asians that rate is down. Yeah, so only group that has head more deaths. You know, the burden of disease is still higher. Might Artymmus is still getting this. There's they're ill, but the deaths, if I'm reading this correctly. Oh Yeah, group that had an increase in deaths or white, the white population. Right, Yep, Yep, yeah, that sounds that sounds accurate. Like I said, it's I can't help get the thought out of my mind, patty, when you watched television throughout this whole election process and you saw the rallies and you saw the difference in the rallies. He saw the rallies for one important from it, where everyone, everyone was unmasked and grouped and tightly grouped and and not then just pretty much throwing out precautions out of the window. And the other people who are supporting the other candidate. They were in their cars, they were masks, they were trying to socially distance and I know that there's one of those candidates were the majority of of the I guess, supporters are are mostly of the white population and the other other candidate is not, as has more of the other demographic so I'm just saying a lot of that, especially during this time. A lot of that time, I have to think, comes into play. Yeah, and and you wonder here now I don't have right at my fingertips a previous maybe I can find it real quick in a second of what would have been, say for June. So let's look from data as of September...

...twenty three. All right, so after a lot of our protests. Yeah, people, oh my gosh, all these protests going to really spike this because you know, everybody's out there together. Are they masking? So for November would have been too far away, right, because what we have had a two week incubation period for this, is people are going to show, are going to show symptoms. Right. So from September. In September again, we were we were three to one African, a black to to white. It was five hundred and thirty one number of cases per hundred thousand, one thousand, six hundred and ninety for African American. What's my point here? I have no idea that. Look the data right, you can make do whenever you do it, you row absolutely correct. Yep, so, and I'm not saying protest cause a spike. No, I we're talking about early on. Okay, as of August it was for to one, MMM, right, white or seventy seven per hundred thousand, and African Americans were sixteen ten. And let the Latino in the middle at at eight hundred and ninety five, and Asian at that point were much closer to white, at five hundred and forty. So at that point in as of August, powery data show that it's it's for two one. Nobody knew where these cases were coming from. There's no day to hear of where were you? We don't have the contact tracing to say right, right, they were. And don't forget, in in August, you know, junily and August was when really the efforts were starting in the minority community to get testing, to get treat to, you know, to get management of it for the community there. It had gone for a long time without so we don't really didn't really have a good a good picture of that. And again going back on plumity data as of August twenty six, so maybe we're talking even the beginning of August, if you've got a two weeek incubation period of what was happening at that point. I mean, we have these numbers, we don't know what was going on. This data doesn't say what were the occupations of people. But it's really interesting that since so what do we have in August twenty six? We've got a case rate of sixteen ten for African American. And what did we say for for no, November, that rate is. So we're going from from six hundred and ten to to twenty two. Twenty two, I believe it was. Yet six hundred more cases for a thousand, two hundred thousand population in what three months? Yep. And we've gone from we're going up to twelve fifteen for whites from one four hundred. Yep, four hundred. That's eight hundred more in the same period of time. That's crazy if you look at that way, over that time period the cases among white in our area has eclipsed the cases. Yeah, what age adjusted, you know, in a statistical sense. Right, right, yeah, it's I'm you know, I'm glad that you get that. You at the you at the minority of part are working on that, cause I'm looking forward to seeing what the data turns up and see why this is, or at least get an idea of why the numbers are acting the way they do. And you're right, you can always try to bend the numbers, note the tell the story that you wanted to, but nothing. However, whatever story you want to tell, these numbers are certainly interesting one. But there I your eye catching.

Yeah, I can use significant. Yep, I catching it interesting, ie catching, I like it all right. Another thing I want to talk about quick pad before we take our break here, is so we just got out of the holiday period of Thanksgiving and we're going to see what those numbers bring, obviously as far as who traveled and what. You know what that actually did as far as the numbers. Now the next big holiday, Christmas, is on the horizon and also this is a big shopping time. Not People are going to be out and about trying to buy gifts for Christmas. Now I know there are certain areas and in a city that have reached orange, so that dead as that has caused some businesses to close, but if I'm correct, while the malls fall outside of that area, so they can still remain open. So I'm just kind of curious as to what's going to happen when the shoppers go out in. Probably, I wouldn't say you're not going to see, obviously shopping like you did last year because the limitations on allowance of people in the buildings to begin with. But still people are going to be out, you know, shopping and I want, I'm just kind of curious to see what that's going to do to the numbers. Yeah, it's I mean, the way we get, I think, that information is when the county health commissioner has his weekly news conference and he talks about contact tracing. Right. Hopefully, you know I'm going to drop this down, but hopefully you know, somebody, one of my media colleagues, will remember to say if there is a big spike, was it? Was it the meal or people saying I was out? I didn't, you know, I just ate with my family, but then I went shopping for forty rights. Right, we be able to do that. But I see, I think here's the difference that I think that the public places, with some exceptions. But, and I'm not a big shopper, so I not either. Funnier, from what I'm reading and what I'm hearing, they're enforcing mask rules. Yeah, the most part. Now I go to a major supermarket in the area and there are people who the mask is blow, Sometimes Chin blow, knows. No one is saying none of the security people are saying, Hey, please wear your mask correctly. Right. Work at a local Y, MCA. We're still open for the time being and we hope we stay that way because we are not in the orange zone and much of the time we, my colleagues and I the we are asking people, please remember to wear your masks correctly. I and so we are very much enforcing that. I think the store, I think that business people who want to stay open are going to be asking people right now. That makes sense properly, especially well enough store where you can say to somebody you don't want to embarrass them, but you know, I sort of took somebody aside the other night and say listen to you know, people are saying stuff. You know all try. Well, there is no try. You have you have to do this and I think if you have that conversation with with somebody and other other people in the store see you doing that. That will instill confidence that you are trying to take this seriously in order to stay open. Right, you don't ask, there is no it. It has to be done. Yeah, that when you're public and when you can't stay six feet apart, you've got to wear you have to put the mask up in order to be in these places. No shirt, no shoes, no masks, no service. Right, right. I know a lot of the people who were talking. I know this was a concerned to a lot of businesses. By the way, is that the numbers that were reported about the increases of covid seemed to be from gatherings at personal homes or residences or, you know, areas of people are congregating. It doesn't seem to be the schools and the businesses that are the the culprit, if you will, to the spike in numbers. So it's almost in a sense, and again you can everyone can interpret these numbers the...

...way they want, but it's almost like the businesses and in the school some schools and and gyms and stuff like that are being almost punished because the people are not following the rules when they get to their own residence or when they hang out with other people and their in their private places. Well, so the governor was in town the other day and he took issue with Dr Mendoza saying that he was questioned. I'm hearing that from our county health people that the spread is in private gatherings, not in these not in public places. Governor came back. It was a bit of a you know what kind of contest the statement from from, you know, the Health Commissioner. But to the governor's point that if I'm in my home, if I have poker night, night, Friday night or whatever, night, poker night, but a bunch of people over playing poker, we're not wearing masks and then we go to the gym, Oh yeah, all right, and then we go someplace out and then we go get our hair cut. So again it comes down to contact tracing. So the Monroe County contact tracers may be hearing I would over to mass to play poker right in the Patty and Matt and you know, name a bunch of other people right. So we had six or eight people playing poker and then each of us went to our respective gym and that's where I think that's where the governor is saying we need to close down the places in these hot spots that could be like spokes on the wheel right, kind of a kind of a celery in the the spread. What I got what you're saying. Yeah, I'm just saying no. So I think again, I'm not in the governor's head, but I that's the way I interpreted the comment that he and one of his people who were at that news conference. That's the way I interpreted it. Is that we can't control what goes on in somebody's house right now, and that makes sense to make that the police should be knocking ondoors and counting cars and drive what you seem to be innovating that which no one in Monroe County was on right Ye. So he has to control what he can control. Right, public spaces right help what you do in your own home. The privacy of your own home is your home. But public health, if you're not going to take public health into your house with you, the people charge with public health have to do that. Have to look out for the public. That's my sense of it. Nope, that that's actually very valid. It makes sense because obviously you're right. If everyone's doing poker night, then they all go out to their respective gyms or stores or bars or whatever they go afterwards. You have the potential is putting you, whatever you have from that poker night to all those various locations. And, essence, though, it is still the fault of those private gatherings. That sounds like too. So that that's that's the bad things, that people aren't following the rules at home and because of that, to be safe, which makes sense, that the way you say it, we have to close down these areas so people who were having conquering at home don't spread them to these to these establishments. All right, and who knows the conch if someone say I went to Your House for Poker night, there was six or eight other people there and I somehow contract covid I may not want to. I may protect you and say I was at the gym on choose right. Yeah, yeah, of being honest about where I was and contracting this. That's good a point. That's a very good point. It's a very good point. All right. Well, we're gonna have to take a break. Patty, always informative talking to you. I got to remind everyone...

...that you got to visit the minority reporter Dotnet to get the full version of the headline news that you heard earlier in the show. Also, I'm looking forward to seeing the stories that Patty's work on for next week as well, because it's going to include what we just talked about, hopefully, and I'm dying to see with that, with those numbers turn up. So looking forward to seeing that as well. And also, don't forget your you have an option to subscribe at the minority reporter Dotnet and I personally subscribe because I enjoy getting those stories and I believe that you will too. So definitely check that out. And if you missed any of this episode, of you, if you're if you're tuning in right now and you're like, oh my gosh, they're they're going to break and I missed Patti's awesome dialect and Matt and her going back and forth. You could go to inside the margins RADIOCOM and catch the podcast of this show and you can also go to I heartcom and wherever you get your podcast. Patty, always a pleasure to talk to you and again, thank you for not being too upset that I forgot to tell you about our new spots. Are Well, just not I how came I how can I do that? This is good. This is people are are paying attention to the things that you and I are talking about, and that is that's good. That's good for our community. I absolutely agree with that and I want to remind you also the show would not be as good as it is without you. So we need you here and we appreciate you here and we appreciate everybody who listens to us, and that includes our sponsors. So thank you. Thank you. All right, let's go ahead and take our break. We'll be right back. This is inside the margins. Welcome back to inside the margins. Okay, some final thoughts and actually some good news, right, because all we talked about is bad covid news. So I want to talk about some good things that have happened, and the recently. So president elect Joe Biden's making history with his White House communications team. Biden revealed an all female team to the public. It's it's going to be the voice of his administration, he said. So here the names of the people that he selected. Jen Saki, she'll be the White House press secretary. Kate Bettingfield, with the White House communications director. Beddingfield, has served as Biden's campaign communications director and in a statement Biden called it a team experience community, a team of experience communicators who will bring diverse perspectives to their work. So that's pretty cool with the all female public communications team that she's going to he's going to have for the White House. And also in Religion News, the Archbishop of Washington DC is making history, as as the Catholic churches. First African American Cardinal, so Pope Francis elevated at Wilton Gregory to the College of cardinals during a ceremony at the Vatican on Saturday, and Gregory was one of thirteen men installed during the ceremony. In the seven two year old Gregory is the highest ricking African American Catholic in US history. So there you go. There are some things that are happening positively. It looks like under the current, a minute, the new or the incoming administration, things are looking more decent, I guess, for women and people of Color. So I want to make sure that we entered the show but some bright news, not just a bunch of Duman glum with Covid all right, thank you so much for joining myself and Patty and I thank you to our sponsors, salvators. Make sure you USIT. Saltorscom you to see what they got going on there. And until next week, you have a safe week. This is inside the margins. Will see you next Monday. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Inside the margins is sponsored by salvators. I just took a DNA...

...test. Turns out I'm a hundred percent Rochester. That's right, I got seven hundred thousand matches. We are all COOGIE's. I can't wait to shook your hand. Oh wait, I can't, but I can feed you. salvators famous film and You touchless delivery. So those thecom.

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