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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode · 1 year ago

Floyd vs. Prude

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We Talk about the Chauvin verdict, Walk in Vaccinations and Vaccination requirements at schools and sporting events 

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Hello and welcome to another edition of inside the margins. I am your host, Matt Wilson. Getting over some cold weather for spring, and the last few days I've been too bad. Saturday was particularly pretty good. Sunday a little little gray, little cloudy, but you know what, that's to be expected in this time of the year. A lot going on the news. The shapin trial. We have a verdict on that. We're going to talk a little bit about that and in regards to the verdict, also the transcripts and the prude case were released. We'll talk about that. We got some information on vaccination requirements. When it comes to education, will try to get into that as well, and also walkins are being accepted at multiple vaccination sites. What you don't you don't need an appointment, and we're going to talk about the effects that may have on people but before we do any of that, I am happy to announce that she has returned. She did not leave me. My friend, my cohost, patty singer. I missed you and welcome back in good afternoon to you, Patty. I didn't realize we had abandonment issues. Here I was, I was scared, I don't know, I didn't know what to do. All Right, Matt couple weeks, you know, in a couple months, vacation plan September. We need to work, we need to look at I am and I'm not making I'm not making land this. I'm all about mental health. We need to work on this for that time and September, when when I won't be here? I don't I want you to I want you to feel. Once you feel okay, we have to talk off are regards to my abandment issues. When you go, I am going, just so you know. It's just want to make sure that you're okay. I'm prepared for it. Yes, I and I appreciate that. Thank you well, welcome back, Patty. I am happy that you are back. Thanks, Matt. So in the headlines for minority reporter that's upcoming week. The Rochester City School district is planned five day return to classrooms when the academic year resumes on September eight. Heading toward that, city schools are holding a registration drive for families who are new to the district. The transcript of the Daniel prude investigation has opened the secret world of what Grand Juries do. The George, George Floyd, the video equals Trayvon Martin. As we continue to talk about policing, reform, justice, social equity and how police deal with black and brown communities. In National News, nearly nine billion dollars will boost the will boost the help for community development. Local News, equity enters the conversation about access to healthcare. Monroe County legislators seek investigation into allegations at Monroe Community Hospital. The city and the county announced funding to help those who are facing evictions and Homelessness, and an editorials. Rochester needs to show the same courage as Minneapolis, writes the Reverend Myra Brown. Justice is delivered in the Floyd death case. An analysis by Carol Elizabeth Owens Matt. Thank you so much, Patty, and, as you can hear, petty did a much better job of doing those headlines and I did last week. So definitely let your back and if you want to hear the full versions of those headlines, you can go to the minority reporter dotnet. You get the full versions of the headlines at Patt I just talked about. You will also have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter. All you got to do is click on the option there you can get the digital or the hard copy, whichever one you prefer. I am a subscriber to the minority...

...reporter. I think it's a great way for me to stay informed as to what's happening and the community. So definitely take advantage of that option. And also we like to hear feedback. We want to hear what you think about or what suggestion that you have. You can send an email to the minority reporter at editor at minority reporter DOTNET. Again, that's editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And, of course, if you've missed any past episodes of inside the margins, you can go to our website, which is inside the margins radiocom for any episode, including this one, you can hear it in its entirety. All right, Patty, we have a lot to talk about, so we'll start off, of course, with the biggest story across the nation the Derek Shavin case. Will kind of dive right into that when we come back from this break. This is inside the margins, all right, Patty, so let's go ahead and talk about it. Everyone else talking about it. It's the big news all across the nation the guilty verdict in the Derek Shavian trial. I don't I'm not sure how much of that you watched. I did watch a bit of it. I couldn't watch all of it, but I watched much as I could and looked like the prosecution did a great job at presenting the evidence. They had the the the lady from the EMT and Fire Department there who was saying she was kind of in shock of what she was seeing and she was trying to tell them that him to stop and to, you know, offer some assistance to him, to to get him to help, and he was he would refuse that. And there's a bunch of other people that testified. Just want to get your overall thoughts on that trial. I confess I did not watch it. Variety was one of which it was going on a lot while I was it was on during the day a lot. We're not able to do that and I just, I guess, chose chose not to review it in the evenings. Yeah, I made I got, you know, made a conscious decision not to do that when, you know, covering covering Daniel prude, writing about that, reading about that. I we all have what we can, what we can emotionally colored yet, right, and that was it's it's interesting because there were in there have been calls ever since the Attorney General, New York Attorney General, has said that there was not giving an indictment against the officers. For what is? What is justice? HMM, and that is come up again and this, you know, justice for George Floyd. and has there been justice or was there one incident in which a person was held accountable? Right, so what is what is? What is? There may be justice for George Floyd, but is there justice in the in that whole situation, or was one person held accountable? I've read, I've read different, different things of what this verdict will mean in the long run. Yeah, and it's people talk about is it is it is George Floyd and Daniel Prud situations. Are they the same? I have said I to lots of people and I think I may have said it on the show. If not, I'm saying it now. Had the city of Rochester been up front about Daniel prude, would we even have had a George Floyd? Right, we don't. We don't know that. There's there's no way to know. But this, don't forget this. The incident with Mr prude happened in March, the end of March, and then we have two three months later, the incident with George Floyd. So if the world had known about Daniel Prude, what what may have happened? Maybe nothing may have the same thing would have played out. We don't. We don't know that. Two black men who died in the last people to touch them for police. Are they the same or different? People will argue both sides of that. I would encourage people to read, or at least skim the one two hundred pages of grand jury testimony. The New York...

Attorney General released the testimony for reasons she wanted, which she came to Rochester and said there was not going to be an indictment. She wanted transparency. I mean at the time I got the sense that she felt the justice system had done a disservice to Daniel prude. I don't know that. I don't know the law. The only law I know is from reading the transcripts. The same way it was explained to the grand jurors, who voted fifteen to five not to indict. So this was the grand jury, this is the evidence that the attorney general selected to be presented. If the grand jurors did not come back with an indictment, who do you look at to say, why wasn't there an indictment? You know, that was the evidence. They were presented. They were allowed to ask questions. So when you read the transcript, there are and I would call your attention. If you don't have time to read twelve hundred pages, I certainly would suggest that you read the First Section, which the first session, which lays out what a grand jury does, what these grand jurors will be, what their role is going to be, what their job is going to be. How many of them? There were twenty three grand juries and needed to be sixteen present for for to have anything happened in twelve had to vote, twelve had to agree on on whatever they were voting on. So all that was really interesting. I would also recommend that you read sessions seven believe that's the one in which two of the three officers testify. They wave immunity and they testify and that's that's interesting because they play the body camera video and the officers are explaining what is going on. Now they're under oath, so they can't make this look better and that it is. I mean they're narrating what happened on the video. They can't rewrite history here because the grand jurors are looking at the video. See Right. So if they if they say a in the grand jury to see Q, The say, wait a minute, what are you talking about? It it's right there, right, so you can yeah, you think there's no revision as history going on here, and it's and it's interesting to hear them talk about what else is going on around them. I'm one of the officers talks about the ambulance response. I have always found that rather winterrest. We both have, yes, absolutely great talk about the use of the spithood and how people have come to think that that was a contributor to the to the man's death. When you hear about why it was used and how it's used in context, how it's used in other instances, you get more of all, you get a broader picture of that and that we mentioned this before we went on the air. Will people want to read this and, when they finish reading it, go huh? Now? I'm not so sure. Yeah, YEP, no, you're right. It's tough because I think a lot of people that we talked about this earlier. I think people at this point of already have a pre judgment. They've a lot of them have made up their mind and what they think about already that and it's hard to present other facts at this point in time. I know you and I because what we do we always look at everything. We try to analyze it by the facts are put in our face. I do think, personally, that floyd improved are different and just really quick I'll briefly dive into that, and I do think it's the transcripts are definitely something that I think people should look at. I know it's a lot of it's a lot. You're right, twelve...

...on your pages is not a small amount of reading. So I think you what you said this the section that you suggested, and also the skimming process. You might want to take advantage of that, because I understand that twelve on your pages as as a lot of time to take to read through all of that. But here are the differences, in my opinion, that this, I guess, the the very obvious, I would say, differences in these two cases. Number one, after what happened with George Floyd, the police department had already awarded the family a multimillion dollars settlement in the death of George Floyd. So when you do that, are you already setting up yourself as saying you might feel a little guilty as a what happened, when you're already giving money to the family because your department is somehow involved with the death of that individual? Number two, Derek Shavin. They've looked into it and they're bringing up more charges against him because he has a history of doing this. This is not the first time he's been involved with possibly going too far. There's like the twelve more instance, I guess, since is where he's been reportedly perhaps a little overly aggressive. Number three, for me, when it comes to criminal cases, there's one word I know we, you and I, both discusses all the time. It's intent. Right, intent is always the most important part. What it was your intention here? Did you intend to do harm? Or what? And when you look at George Floyd and how long, pardon me, Chauvin held his knee on that guy's neck and and how long he's and his history, this is instant. Is An instance to me where I think there is a problem with Derek Shauvin himself. This particular officer, I think is a bad person and has a problem. He probably should have been removed from from the force a long time ago. I'm not I'm not saying that there's other there's not other issues with the police department out there, and I know the other police, the police officers that are involved with this are going to have their day in court as well. I think it's sometime in Juni Kepper, I can't I'm not exactly sure exactly when the date is, but I think in this case you can point to this one officers say this, something is wrong with this guy. Now, with the prude case, I don't know if you can pull one officer out and say this person has an issue. You know what I mean? I think there's a series of issues and, like you said, you and I have talked to before in regards to the amnest thing. That right there to me is a starking issue, but I think there's a series of events that may make you question of how this was handled. But it was there actually in somebody intentionally trying to do something in the prude case. That's where I think there's a difference, where in the floyd gays and the flood case, Derek Schaudon, I think he had some intent, he has a he has an issue. I think there's more to it with him versus the police officers that were involved with the prude case and those that's that's my opinion. So there were sixty witnesses called, I think, in for the to the grand jury for prude and including the the office of the officers. I'm not quite sure that who they are. So everybody, anybody who testified, their name is redacted in that. But if you've been paying attention you can figure out who some of them are. You don't know, you might not. You would have to match up. You'd have to go look at the body camera video to see which officers testified right right, because they describe where they are by their positioning with Daniel pruved so if you if you look at the video and then you know have it on the next screen the transcript. You can figure out who the officers are. Sure you can figure out when the medical examiner is testifying by you know, there are there are clues, but you carousel. Sure know the name of the person? Right? You don't know. So there's a person who teaches what's called this segmenting procedure. Has taught it throughout. That's one that's been quite criticized. But they talks about why...

...they do it, how they do it. There's a one of the one of the officers, is talking about how he's in what they call the tripod position, where he has his hands on his head to stabilize them, and then he says when he feels Daniel proved not resist, you know, feels feels his muscles kind of relaxing a little bit. He relaxes and he goes down on one knee and then when he sends his more agitation coming back, you know they're afraid that he's going to try to get up because he tried to get up previously. Right. So that's why they're doing this. You can buy it or not. I'm not telling you that you have. You have to buy yeah, sure, but the grand jury bought read it for yourself and decide, but it provides the context that I think we are too quick to dismiss. The big thing to me, it always has been, always will be, is intent. I don't know. I'm not. Again, I want to make sure that I'm clear when I say this. I'm not saying there weren't issues. I'm not saying that at all. I'm not saying that everything went smoothly. Is certainly did not. If it, if it went smoothly, MR proved, it still be here. But I don't I don't think everything went the way it should have. Gotten that I think we have to look into something. Certainly do. I'm not. I'm not saying that we don't, but I'm saying when you look at the Floyd case, you and if you watch the floyd video and you and I'm sure by that by now you've least seen a portion of it. What you're describing in the proud case, where the officer who you know let's up when there's easy and gets back and tightens up on there's not. There was no letting up with with with with Shavin. He he was just pressed. Saying on that on George Floyd for that nine minutes there's no. There's no let up. When I when the when Floyd's begging for gasping for breath, no let up. There is an intent. To me there there's there's something. Like I said, there's an issue with Derek shot and I don't know if you can point to one officer, pardon me, and the proud case and say there's an issue with that officer. That's to be that is the big difference. Yeah, and it's an issue. So there's also in the in the grand jury, you know they'll talk about they have people from strong who were there and there has been a lot of criticism of what happened. You know, how was he released so quickly after the first call? The testimony starts with his brother recounting everything going through, you know, from from when he arrived in Rochester, actually when he went and got him in the Buffalo area, bringing him here. I mean the whole thing is here, Yep, for you, for you to read and and think about and digest. And again, everybody's under oath. So if they're lying and it's found out they're lying, their trouble, they are equally right. It's not more trouble right. Then they were from from the get Golt, I didn't get the sense from reading this that they were giving testimony with your both hands in their back pockets to cover their you know what? Yeah, I just and the grand jury is got to ask questions. It's really it's really fascinating to read some of this. DEFINE DOUBT WHAT GOES ON. Again, this is, I believe, the first time that grand jury minutes have been this is the first time. You're absolutely correct. This this is the first time. This is usually secret. Nobody knows what goes on, nobody knows the final vote, nobody knows anything about this. And so here you have it, and it is likely to be very painful reading for a lot of people for a variety of reasons. Yeah, we are in a painful time right now with lots of stuff going on, and I I talk, you know, keep it on the eye right. It's I believe that we have to. In my world, we have to face what is painful in order to move up through that. I agree with that too. I totally agree with that, and I also urge everyone to to look at everything. I'm not trying to if you...

...have, if you've made up your mind, you know that that's that's you, but just have the information that you need to make to make final decisions or final judges, I guess. As what I'm trying to say. And also you got to remember too, it is as you pointed out, it's up to the prosecution to deliver the evidence in order to get the charges. They get a verdict on someone guilty or not guilty. And again, I didn't watch the entire George Floyd thing. I watched them stippets. The prosecution puts, put a up a really good case against Derek Chavin. The evidence was overwhelming against Chavin. I don't know if that was the case with prude, you know, and that's that's the thing. It's it's up to the prosecution to deliver the evidence in order to get that guilty verdict. In the prosecution was, Guy said, just a dominant force in the and then Chauvin case and I don't think there was a lot the prosecution have to go on in the prude case. Well, I mean it. Don't forget they're doing two different things. In and Floyd they're trying to get a conviction right, right. So and again the grand jury is is there enough evidence to bring charges? Right? You're absolutely correct. Had the grand jurors voted the other way, I had they voted to indict, then then we're in a trial, right, right. Will that evidence mean? There's there's an expression, and I'm not that quite sure if I know what it means, but there's an expression of you can indict a ham saling, so can you? So you indict anything? I don't know. Again, I've heard that expression. I'm not quite sure what it what the point of it is. But the indictment was only, was only really part of this. Right, that's phase. Well, we've got. Now you've got further, further to go. You know, the people were calling to fire the officers. Again, I'm not a lawyer, I don't know, but if they were not indicted, can they be fired for cause? M Good questions. But so they weren't indicted. They followed. You can argue that that training is is, you know what, and the training shouldn't be done and you should change a train you can argue that. But if they don't, if officers don't follow what's called general orders, they get disciplined. Right, right, then change the general orders, which so which rpd is doing in in some respects they are what's called general orders. There are hundreds of them. Yeah, they are changed and they are changing some of those. But so you can argue with the training, you can say the training is horrible, all right, but that's what they have to do if to follow that that training. They weren't indicted. I don't know if they can be fired without them coming back and suing the city free wrongful termination. Yeah, and then you and I, the taxpayers, pay for around the hook for more. I don't know the answer to this, but it's not going to be settled by shouting and saying all police are horrible and we can't have a police department anymore. That's not going to solve the problem. I agree that you and I think you know what I think in a few episodes back. I don't think you know. I know we talked about this at length, I'm sure, but I don't don't think you might even disagreed about the restructuring of the training and making things a little better in that aspect of policing. I think that's valid. I think there's nothing wrong with saying that. You know what. What happened there was not good. It was terrible and we need to do we need to do what we can to not have that happen again and we need to do things. We need to maybe restructure some things and and do some things with training and you know, you look at the fit team and the pick team and all that stuff, you know there's things that they're trying to put in place and I'm not against any of that whatsoever. I think that's great that...

...we're we're trying to fix that, but trying to point the finger at one particular bad person, I don't know we're going to be able to do that, and that's and that's the that's the difference. That's the big difference. Is it's you can tell that Shavin's kind of a bad person and if you look at his past, he's not going to I'm not going to go there because we don't know, but he has had, he has done some actions he is which have been which have brought scrutiny. Right, he said he has had some issues. I'm going to that for I'm going that far. I think he's a bad I'm not gonnas he said. I'm not going to because I don't know right he is a good or bad person, but he has he apparently has done some things in his job that have brought more than just raised more than a few eyes. Yes, and just watch the video this just the way, the way he talks back to people are asking what he's doing. He's it's like he doesn't even care. That's why I say that it's there's there's a difference. There's there's there's more of a there wasn't that with the fruit case. There was it. There wasn't anyone who was acting like that. He the way, the way he came across was like, you know what, this is what happens to you if you, if you do drugs. He was saying stuff like that while it's me was on it was on the guy's neck. Who What? That's why I say that's why I jumped to that judge. But there's there's a difference and how this person acted as far as sounding like a decent, caring human being and just trying to stop I get if someone's doing something bad and you're trying to stop them, you're trying to get them under control. Totally get that. But once you have them under control, that's when you got that's when you start asking those questions. Okay, you you got him. He's down, he's unarmed, he's cuffed, you know, and he's not moving and I was gasping for error and your your response is to continue on. There's that's when I think there's an issue and I think that that was that was demonstrated very well by the prosecution in the Floyd case. I don't I did not see that at all in the fruit case and I think there were you know, as you as you read the text, you know they talked about could you have said things to calm them down? Do you think he got it? Yeah, you know, they're with the yeah, I mean, there's always going to be the hindsight of this. Again, you can argue it rightly. Are Wrongly, this is much twenty third. New York has been on pause for what a day? Right, March? Twenty two. Coronavirus. Yeah, right, person who says he has coronavirus. The officers talk about they had not been don't quote me on this because I can't quite the I don't think the pdf of the transcript is searchable. So right now I can't search it real quick. And you know, culture all of it right. I think. I think I recall the officers saying they had not really been issued any PPE at this point. Yeah, cobd was cold. It was brand new. Look at coming in, one of the officers is saying that he has there's they wear gloves. Some people when they when the officers will will approach a seeing they'll put on, you know, batting gloves or driving gloves or something, and some people have mistaken that is, you know, saying that's a sign of aggression. Whatever. They try to protect their hands. Yeah, one of the officers, this was cold, saying that that there, but there was a lot of blood and his gloves were soaked with blood and he goes back to his car to get sanitizer or out something to try to clean off the gloves and clean off his hands. So they don't have the ability at that time to take what's called universal precautions against any kind of bloodborn or airborne right, they called pathogens. Yeah, it was brand was anything like that when you time right right. So there's a context in in some of this as well. Again, you may say, Oh, you're making excuses of no, look at, I didn't want to. I wouldn't have wanted to be there that night. And and the answering that call incredibly difficult. Could the officers have been used as name more try to calm...

...down in that sense? Yeah, most likely, and they and they say that. But is what am I trying to say here? Well, there then, criminally done that. That's right, and that's what that's what that's what comes. Not Calming him down in every every instance. Did that lead directly to the man's yeah, no, and the point you make, ours can be valid. I think we agree. There is I'm no one saying that this was handled the perfect way. It's just that was it handled in a fashion where it was criminal, and that's that's what we're going to work should someone be convicted of a crime because of what happened? And that not. Was it handled badly and could could have been handled, handled better? That's not where. That's not we're debating here. And the charge to the other thing two about this is the charge was criminally neguage in homicide. That's again we didn't know that when the Attorney General said there was no indictment. We did not know at that time what the charge was. Right, charge was criminally neanguage in homicide. And again there is a lot of detail. I think that is going to be session nine. It's either session eight or nine to read. That will explain what the charge is, what you have to get for that very precise language. And then I think it's I think it's either session eight or nine, which will say they don't say which jurors voted, i. for what. They just give the what the what the vote was and it and it talks about that. So if all you have is time to read about four hundred pages, I would think guess session one, sessions seven, eight nine. Yep, I agree. Read, read it. I'm we're not trying to make you go one way or the other. Just saying that it's before you make final judgment is probably a good idea to try to look into as much information as you can and it and that those trash cooptes are available for you to the brow through. We get it's a lot of reading, but it'll do you some good just to give you a kind of a an idea of what the jury was looking at as well. So last thing, if you want to find these, so if you go to the Attorney General's website, which is ag Dot Nytov, you can go to press releases and it's under two thousand and twenty one, Attorney General James Releases Grand Jury Proceedings Related Death Daniel prude. So you can google that and you can and you can find that. So it's on the attorney general the time, with teach James is the attorney general's official website. Excellent, excellent. All right, all right. Well, we'll definitely happy to hear your comments in regards to that too. You can always send an email to us at inside the margins, which is inside by margins at gmailcom. That's inside margins at gmailcom. Or I'm sure the minority reporter will certainly look at your requesting inquired inquiries into this and again, that's editor at minority reporter. Gotten that? Okay, when we come back. I did not mention this before, but I want to get into this, Patty. Looks like governor Cuomo's not letting reporters at at his public things anymore because of what he's been because you are a reporter who goes to events like this and he's not allowing it. So I want to go and get your feedback on that. So we'll talk about that when we come back. This is inside the merchant. All right, welcome back to inside the margins, and Patty hasn't left me yet. So thank you, Patty, because you know my about my issues of a band am in here. So don't you know that when you were a kid, that your dog didn't run away or anything? Did you know what actually the cat climbed up a tree and wouldn't come down. I like looks like what do you know what? I was a kid, my dog was taken for me. I'm not even joking. That's actually true. I will talk about all right, I'm seeing, I'm seeing some some history. All right, real quick, I really want to get to the to the vaccination clinics, but will briefly talk about this, Patty. So CUMO's banning reporters from public events because of all the scanales that are going on now.

The one of the reason why I want to ask you about this, because I know you're a reporter and you have to attend a lot of events to get the stories that you get as a reporter. What is this like in order to get the information accurately from what the announcements that are being made at these events? Well, you know, the first thing was when everything went zoom. HMM, it was a different so yeah, if you've, if anybody's ever watched our did in person news conference it we reporters come across as a very unruly mob every shouting their questions and all this stuff then, and that's kind of how it how it works. It's right. You do you, you you shout out if somebody has a line of questionings. Like, particularly in Rochester where we know each other, it's incredibly respectful media of each other. If somebody is pursuing a line of questioning at a live news conference, other people will let that questioning go for a bit because who knows, I mean it's everything is fair game in a news conference. Give we may pick up some information on that. And I asked some questions on news conference, Zoom Conference the other day that other people did pick up and put in their story. So everything is fair game. So we go to the zoom conferences. In the interest of expediency or whatever, reporters are limited to one question in one follow up right that right away is stifling because you don't get to really pursue a line of questioning and it's it's I mean, I joked the other day on the weekly Covid news conference at Adam Bellow had at some sort of shoulder Injuras, arm and a sling. When it came to me, I said, you know, I'd ask Adam how much you lost off as fastball what. They'd count that as a question against me. So I don't want to ask that. You know, and I and I joked about it. So at least you get something with zoom. If you're not there at all, it is it. No matter how you feel about the media, we are there for you. Yes, I may not always ask the question you want to have asked, but if there's ten or twelve media in the room, someone of some one of us will ask a question that is at least close to what you wanted to know. We're not there, your questions not asked. Yep, if we're not there, the person is not answering to you. Yep, right. And so you, the public, the taxpayer, the one who pays the salaries for the elected officials, you were the one getting short changed. And so by by somebody limiting access to a news conference, they're not offending us. I mean we're we're big men and women. We can have our feelings for it, but I mean we represent you. Yep, and so by shutting US out, they're shutting you out. And if you want to know what's going on, I would suggest that you kind of you know, you right to the governor and say hey, what the media back in, because you're not answering our questions. Yep, hundred percent gree with you, I think. I think you're right. There's a there's mixed emotions about media right now and this secular climate. But no matter how you feel about the media, I think the media is extremely important, because you're absolutely right, Patty. What doesn't matter what side of the fence you're on, doesn't matter what political affiliation you're with, doesn't matter where you your thoughts and your feelings Lye. In regards to what's happening in the world. You still want to know what's going on, probably, and you still want you still may, like you said, perfectly, you may have some questions in your mind about situations and if there's eighty ninety media people there, there's a good chance one of them may ask a question that pertains to how you feel about a situation. Regardless of how you feel about it, if no one's there is it's Garante. It's almost a guarantee that that what you're what you want to know, is not going to be asked, because most of the time a person is not going to just willingly tell things...

...like that. They're going to kind of get their point across or whatever their agenda is, and that's going to be pretty much it and they're gone. They're not going to really add, ask answer any questions that may dive deeper into an issue that you may have, and that's why people like Patty and other reporters that are out there are there to represent you and your community and you know, if they're not there, you don't get those answers. So I do think it's it's tough when rapports are shut out of those kind of events, but it pertains to elected officials. Yeah, yeah, you know, very true. And elected officials, you know, if you don't want to answer the questions, don't have the job right exactly. You were you were voted in by the people, so the people have a right to know some things. That's kind of I've always felt that way after and I think we both feel thig so, Yep, so we all move up from that. That's our thoughts. On that. I know we're running a little short on time, so I really want to get this in. The vactuation sites are now welcoming walkins across the county, which I think is good and also could be challenging at the same time. That's kind of how I feel about that. I want to get your thoughts in that in regards as well. Yeah, so was it last week they had the at the weekly news conference, weekly Covid news conference, they had the way Norway and Doctor Nancy Bennett, who were part of the finger lakes vaccine hub, and bellow had mentioned they we're going to be walking clinics and and my question on that was that sounds great. It sounds like it will make it a lot easier for people, but what if everybody shows up at the same in the same twenty minutes at a site? How do you apportion the right number of vaccine for a site? How do you not have waste of a vaccine at a site? Because there are places that we have a right now we have a lot of vaccine vaccine you. Are you as plentiful here right now? Yes, it may not always be that way everywhere else. And plus the fact apparently the way I am understanding this that areas get their next week's allocation based on how they did last week. Hm. So you don't get the I don't think you get the same number of doses every week. It's a floating allocation based on how well you're doing. So if you go to walk in clinics and for some reason vaccine doesn't get used, do you get ding the next week and get less overall? So it's a I think it's a risk. I think it's a risk they're willing to take because they want to make it as easy as possible for people to get vaccine. As you're getting in the harder to reach people, the people who may not have decided or may decide on the spur of the moment after talking with somebody, may not want to make it a plane. If I don't do it now, I'm not going to do it right. They want to have that available for people. The potential downside of that is will there be vaccine at the site I choose to walk into? Will they? Will they batch the visit? So the vials have, I think the fiser has five or six doses per a little vial and I think the other day on the call. They said MODERNA has ten don't quote me on that. All right, so these these doses, the fiser has to be kept very strictly. You know, that's the super cold one whatever. So if you open that vial, how long can it stay open waiting for people to come in? So if I walk in at one o'clock and they have to open a new fiser bottle for me and there's nobody behind me, would they have me wait a while till more people come in and then am I? Am I inconvenience and then it wasn't. Then you lose the effectiveness of having a walk in again. These are all the things that that they're not a hundred percent sure of, but they are trying to make it as easy as possible for people to get vaccine. So does having a...

...walk in clinic remove a barrier? That's what they're hoping for and hopefully all the would just sticks work out. There's no waste, there's a smooth process. Yep, I agree at that. I think another thing that they were thinking about, I know I think it was even mentioned Patty, is that a lot of times the phone lines get piled up with people are trying to call to make appointments and not everyone's Internet savvy. So the people who are not Internet savvy or hat or don't have access to the Internet may have had issues, you know, scheduling an appointment for the vaccination. So now if you don't have internet and you and the phones are all tied up, this gives an option just to show up to a site and and and potentially get vaccine that day. So certainly understand the reasoning behind this. I said, I there's good intent behind it, but you're right, I do think that there could be some some on it's unexpected consequences to opening it up to everyone who may want to get it. At the same time, the one thing that was an issue that mean that may no longer be an issue was the John Conson and Johnson vaccine, because they did shut that down for a little bit, but it looks like they're going to be reopening that back up now. I believe they're going to have some sort of warning on it for people, for people who maybe have some potential issues with it. So you have the option to not have that one because of that warning label, but I do think they're going to be. It looks like that they're going to be opening it up relatively soon so that that will put another vaccination into the pot which may alleviate some of these potential issues. But we I guess we're gonna have to wait and see how that turns out. Right exactly. And there is a phone number, the five eight, five, seven five, three five, five, five five, for people who do want to call and make an appointment. You don't have to go to the website anymore. Right. They are trying to make it easier for people and and we'll say, I mean one of the questions I hope to remember to ask in the upcoming weeks. You know, so how the first week of Walkins go as far as waste and you know did you did? You hit it right, and that it may take them a couple weeks to figure that out. So they may not have an answer for that right away, right right. So, yeah, I guess we're gonna have to wait and see how these Hala Watkins work, but I hopefully it works well. I hope that that gets more people vaccinated because obviously the more vaccinations happen, the more her immunity that we will have and the more potential of getting things back to what we remember what normal see is can be there. We have a little bit of time left, Patty, and I just want to bring this up real quick. We will have a lot of time to dive into it, but as kind of want to talk about it. So it looks like the schools, some of the colleges and also the supporting arenas locally here are going to require vaccinations in order to attend these facilities in these colleges. I know the buffalo bills have already done that. The Red Wings have not done that yet, but they're it looks at it's under consideration, under consideration with the right wings. I think the Hockey Stadium and Buffalo is doing it. I know a few colleges have already announced it. Some of the colleges even said that they're not going to make remote learning even optional first for certain subjects. So you either will have to get that vaccination or you will not be able to take that in class. As far as some of the colleges, I wanted to get your thoughts on that as well. As far as these kind of establishments making it mandatory to be vaccinated in order to attend them, I think there's been some talking. Mean what will school districts do, and I'm not sure about that. I think, for so the Red Wings are doing, you have to have some kind of negative test. You'd yea R or the rapid test or show your proof of vaccination to get in. These are will get. These are private businesses. Yes, say they're subsidized by the community because of their stadiums and things like that, but there's a private business can can't, in...

...my book, can do what it want. If you want to, you really want to go to a sabers red wings bills game, you'll get a test or you'll get a vaccine. That they can. They can do what they want about that. I think it becomes tougher when you're going to start talking about school districts. Yes, I agree. What's what's your local school district going to do that? That is a to me, of much harder decision be. Personally it's a clear cut decision, but but overall and thinking about it and having the way all your all of your constituency, that's a harder decision than a private business. To say you have to word it's a same. Now people may not go into a store that's so much here, but I've read about an other states. You know, one store says mass required, a store selling a similar products as no mass required. I mean people will go where they feel comfortable. Yep, I guess that's agree and that's fine. But when it comes to, you know, public public health in public spaces that are subsidize or run by the taxpayer, that's where this conversation can get sticky. For me it's clear cut, but I understand for other people it can get sticky. Right, I think you and I are the same wave of length. It's clear up for me too, and and I think I'm not going to say anything, but I think if you listen to show you you kind of know where we're. Patty, nice stand. But I will say this, Patty, I will get your pigning on this too. So, so far it's only been private colleges that I've done. I Think University of Roster and, I believe Cornell University both have made it mandatory to be vaccinated to go there. There the question arises what like if the stunty schools do it, because sun he's a little different than the private run colleges. Sunni is not yet as not yet announced that they're going to do it. They are there. They are definitely pushing for it. They're pushing people to get back to the they're they're trying to make it easier by having Bac nations done at on college campus. I know that some of the sum locations, at least not all of them, but some of them, are. But I think if sunny initiates that, does that initiative as the where they want to have mandatory back stations in or to attend the college, that may get a little dicey. Well, I will argue. My father always wanted me to be a lawyer, so I'm going to argue. This is very fine esoteric point. The University of Rochester, Cornell, private institutions. Okay, private institutions, but if a private institution takes federal money, MMM, if a private institution is a five hundred and one, see three and it's not and it does not have to pay taxes like educational institution. Right, right, a five hundred and one to see three. And if they provide, in the case of the unit versity, and it's no, the medical center, charitable care and things like that, how private are they? Right? Right, yeah, good point. Good Point. There's a lot of there's a lot of actual government or public backing to these quote unquote, private institutions. So that's a very, very valid point. Yeah, I I'm just curious to see where this is going to go. Again, I have been vaccinated. I know you did it. You went under vaccination trials, so you know I've definitely not against getting vaccinated. Of course I'm not. I urge everyone to get vaccinated, but you're right, there are people out there who aren't for this and I just kind of wonder what what's going to happen if the public or the private, sorry the public, schoolings mandated, and we'll see. I guess what that is. All right, Patty, we are running out of time, so it's time for us to run. But Hey, before we do run, I want to remind everyone...

...that earlier in the show petty did discuss some headlines that you can see in the minority reporter and you can go to the minority reporter Dotnet to get the full versions of those headlines. Also, you will have the option to subscribe to the minority reporter and all you got to do is hit on that subscribe button. There you'll have the option to get the digital or the hard copy totally up to you. I am a subscriber to the minor a reporter. I think it's a great way to stay informed and get your community information. So take that. Take advantage of that option, and also you can reach out to the minor reporter by setting an email to editor at minority reporter DOTNET. If you have any comments, questions or suggestions. And if you're just tuning in right now, you have missed inside the margins. That's okay. You can get this and all the other episodes of inside the margins are inside the margins RADIOCOM. You can also go to iheartcom or wherever you get your podcasts. All right, Patty, I again. It was so great to have you back and that you have some meaningful conversations with a person besides myself. So thank you so much for being here and that she was on. Maybe I know. Don't leave me, Patty. Will you be well? You be back next week? Pressures on, I'm put this way. I'm planning on it. Okay, we'll see if somebody else has all the plans, but you never know. Right, I'm planning on it all right. For Patty Singer, I am Matt Wilson. This is the inside the margins and will see you next week. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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