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Inside the Margins
Inside the Margins

Episode 9 · 2 years ago

Alzheimer's disease in the African American community

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

On this episode of Inside The Margins, Patti Singer delivers the headline news and discusses Alzheimer's disease in the African American community, we talk about the plastic bag ban in New York State, and a positive story from the Rochester City School District.

Marginalized groups can be the target of negative beliefs, behaviors or judgments from others. On this show we seek out marginalized voices and perspectives and tackle some of the conflicts and issues these groups face. Now is the time to have your voice heard. This is inside the margins with your host, Matt Wilson. Well, hello and welcome to another addition of inside the margins, and I'm your host, Matt Wilson. Couple of quick things I want to announce. We have been put officially now on Iheart Radio, so congratulations. Saw Us. You can still obviously listen to our show on one hundred point nine W Xir, but if you ever miss it or or if you want another option, if you're not new and this area of Rochester, you can go to Ihart RADIOCOM and you can search inside the margins and you'll find us. So we are officially on the IHEART radio network and that's that's great news. eventulations. Thank you so much. Good for you. I appreciate that. Thank you. By the way, that Bos you here is, of course, patty singer, and Patty is going to be giving us the headline news. Before we do that, just want to remind you, you can also visit the minority reporters website at minority reporter Dotnet to get all the full stories that we're going to talk about. So let's go ahead and talk about these stories. Good afternoon, Patty him at and this week's minority reporter. We were writing about the the plan to draw a more pre K children back to the Rochester Skidi City School district and hopefully keep them there throughout their APP academic careers went to a vote on February twenty seven. The vote was to the proposal was to close schools forty four and fifty seven from their current use as elementary schools and turn them into the pre K centers. Minority reporter went to press before the vote, but after a lengthy discussion by the School Board on Thursday the twenty seven, the proposal past five to two. Cynthia Elliott and Beatrice Lebron opposed the measure. Our CSD will be in the news for months because of its changes for the PREK and also because of its budget situation. As part of that, the RCSD is taking a new approach to budget discussions with the community. It has started going directly to residents to help them understand the budget crisis. The School Board is holding town hall meetings to explain the budget process and provide an opportunity for input regarding the planning for the two thousand and two and twenty one school year. Superintendent Terry Day to schedule to present the upcoming year's budget on march seventeen. After that, our CSD will hold a second budget town hall meeting at six o'clock March twenty five at the central office to give the students, parents and community members the opportunity to ask questions, voice concerns and make suggestions. The budget isn't finalized until May. An advocate for all timers education is pushing for African Americans to learn about the disease. To marry mentor is talking is urging African Americans to attend the Doctor Lemuel and Gloria Rodgers Symposium which is March five at the edget in community center. The event is free. Topics include research, care for people with the disease and their families and ways to use lifestyle and other preventive methods to reduce the risk of developing dementia. MINTOR has seen people struggle with the disease and family seen family struggle with with the disease. Her great grandmother had Alzheimer's Disease and older African Americans are about twice as likely as white to develop all timers or other dementias, according to the Alzheimers Association. In National News, as political observers...

...continue to track America's high valued black vote to see which Democratic presidential candidate may win the lion share this election year, the national policy alliance will host National Black Political Convention in Washington on April Sixteen through eighteen. The status of healthcare, economic and Environmental Justice, affordable housing, education, criminal justice, but black veterans affairs, energy and media relations and the role of black entertainment industry are among the issues that will be discussed at that conference in DC. Vanessa Bryant has filed a wrongful death suit against the helicopter company in the death of her husband and her daughter gg she is in her lawsuit, she's stating that the pilot was flying at an accelerated rate and under extremely foggy conditions when the helicopter crashed and killed Kobe and Giana Bryant, along with seven other people. The lawsuit also states that the defendant is went express helicopters allowed the flight with, quote, full knowledge that the helicopter was flying in, quote, again, unsafe weather conditions. In opinion, this week everyone had george pain, excuse me, George Pain, had called for a Joe Biden, cory booker ticket. He had said that, but to the shock of the Democratic Establishment, it seems that Bernie Sanders has become the front runner. But now he says that a sanders booker ticket makes sense. He says Booker is Progressive Liberal, a strong debater and a tireless campaigner. And according to George Pain, this ticket looks good. He says, unless you are an outright bigot, it's impossible to ignore bookers intelligence at hand, his inner drive to bring America back from what pain calls the brink of the precipice of civil war, at least in terms of our civil discourse. Jesse Jackson also writes about Sanders and he says that when talking about Democratic Socialism, the Keyword to emphasize is the word democratic. According to Jesse Jackson, sanders isn't talking about making America into Cuba or Venezuela. He's talking about extending social guarantees like those offered in most other advanced industrial states, and he invokes Denmark or Sweden as as examples countries that have universal healthcare at a lower cost, they have paid family leave, higher minimum wages, they have a lower inequality, less poverty and higher life expectancies. And again, minority reporter Dotnet to read the those full stories and also to get news throughout the week. Matt, thank you so much, Patti. Just want to mention also I don't believe the show would be as successful as it is without your assistance and your contribution. So thank you very much for helping us get on iared as well. Penny, you are welcome and thank you for the invitation to help. Thank you so much before we get into the topic of Alzheimer because I want to talk about that. My my grandmother actually passed away from Alzheimer's. She actually did have that. I just real quick. I did hear what the story about Kobe Bryant's wife suing the helicopter company for that flight. Now, just I just want to get this out of the way. Kobe Bryant's net worth is somewhere upper like five hundred million or something, that he's he's extremely rich. So I don't believe this is for financial gain. This is kind of more of a principle. Would you agree with that? You know what, I have not followed it that closely for a variety of reasons. When I heard about the lawsuit, I was I was thinking to myself, if this, if this gets standing, if this goes anywhere, if this is adjudicated, if there is any kind of award, what charity would this that was what I was thinking. What charity to help? Maybe, you know, girls and women's sports, some other type of of cause that we don't often hear about and women's rights.

Right, you know, domestic abuse? Who, who knows what that could be, but that that was what I was thinking, as I wonder where, what, what charity that she has in mind that that can benefit from this tragedy? Right, not that. And that makes sense, because I gain not worth of something like five hundred million to read something ridiculous amount that the money isn't needed, obviously in that household. Okay, so let's go ahead and get in touch into that topic of Alzheimer's. I think it's an important topic because if you ever watch television or television shows about people who have alshemer disease. Normally you don't see African Americans. Representative is usually an older white male or older white lady who is, you know, beginning to see the effects or suffer from the effects of Alzheimer's. When I do know again, my grandmother suffered and I have many friends and family members also have had their mother's or other loved ones suffer from a disease. I think it's very important for it to be recognized in the African American community. I agree. When when I was doing the research for this story and I did have a chance to talk to the the keynote speaker will be Carl Hill from the Alzheimers Association. He is going to talk about research and how people can get involved in clinical trials and he'll have that more to say late practical clinical piece. You know what's going on and how you can find out about it, where some of the other speakers will talk more about what it's like to actually be that family caregiver. And you asked him the question. I said are do people fear that diagnosis and it didn't really want to. He didn't really want to go there, but the start of the conversations. You. Nobody wants to hear a cancer diagnosis. Nobody wants any diagnosis. But if you had to have let's say, okay, we're going to give you the big three, right, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer's. Say You have to have one of those diagnosis, which one would you fear the most? Which one would you fear the least? I think for me my fear would be alzheimers. Not that I want every other two right, but but you think of things that. Okay, cancer is treatable, caught early, it can be, you know, quote unquote, curable. Right you always there's always that shadows hope, because always that shadow. But cauterally treated appropriately. You you have many many, many, many many years. Diabetes can be controlled right, putting what kind to and how late and how it. But but Alzheimers is affects that. That's our mind. That's that's all. Whatever, Philip, you know, philosophies you believe in, whatever, you know, religious traditions, spiritual much of us is is is in our is, in our minds. Is something in our minds and that is to me, a very scary thing. I think, I think you had a nerve there I think you're right. If you're a person who has a family or extensive amount of friends, to lose the memories of the your childhood or your children's upbringing or the experiences in life that meant so much to you, just all of a sudden fear of that going away. I think you know, if you're going to pass on, having a clear mind is something that we all hope to have before you pass on. You really can't have a clear mind with I mean, I guess it's clear, but it's not the way that you want to be clear. So I think that's you're right. I think as far as those big three, I think I would fear most alzheimers because I don't want to let go of the experiences that I've had in life. But to me, the thing is, do you know that right? I mean, that's yeah, that's good mind. I mean the mind is fascinating. What do you know? So so I think of no one that I have known directly but acquaintances who have had BOOGEARIG's disease's. And and here your body fails you, but your mind. So you're trapped in this body that is breaking...

...down, that is making you a prisoner. And yet, you know it. My Dad died of metastatic cancer. He was sharp until probably the last couple weeks. So he so he's in this this in this nursing home bed. There's nothing he can do about that. And yet he he's cognizant. My Grandmother also died, of all timers, and I was I was living away when she died and I had a big kind of work thing. And you know, my mother calls me of Nan and Di, would you want me to come home for funeral? And I told of what had been going on with work and she said, your grandmother died to you years ago. No, do what you need to do right, which, of course, Adam, you know, turned into a disaster. I understand. But but her point was that, you know, Nana had died a long time ago. For me, the woman I knew, that I grew up with, that I spent weekends with, who used to make American chops to we and and you know that person was long gone. Yeah, yeah, and that's the that's the what I think scares people and scares family about this disease and and scares those of us in middle age. You know. Okay, where are my keys. I said I used to work with a woman who said it's not forgetting where you put your keys, it's forgetting what keys are for. Yep, so I'll say, where are my keys for the house, for the car? I know what there for, I just can't find the book. But we're scared about that. Yeah, YEP, no, you're right. I think you had another point too, is the impact that you have on your family and your friends, having them see you deteriorating that matter. All of a sudden you don't remember their names or you call them the wrong name or you can't even I remember when my grandmother was beginning to get worse, she thought that I was my grandfather. So every time I walked in I would say I would sell all my grandmother and she would like ask me where I parked the car and if I got the groceries yet. And also I began to see that process of just first recognizing me a little bit done. Thinking out was somebody else that not even knowing who I was when I walked in the room. And I think the I'm afraid of having an impact on my family that way more than my own personal loss. That makes sense, it does, and you lose. You know, it's interesting. I was having a discussion with somebody today about something else, but I think it relates to this. Is that we we spend our very young years dependent and we spend our old years dependent, potentially dependent. So all that middle time is fifty, sixty, maybe seventy years. You have been independent. When your five, six, seven, eight, ten years old, you don't know what that independence is, right, right, yeah, you just you just want more freedom to run around the neighborhood. And when you were later the rules every adults, you can really understand independence. But you're sixty five, seventy, five, eighty five years old and you begin to lose you had. And how frightening, for lack of a better word, is that, because you, you know, you had those independence and now you need help. Right, what is that? You know, and that's something that you know, concerns me. I figure I've got, you know, twenty thirty good years left, but at the end of those I want to enjoy my independence now and create whatever memories I'm going to think about with whatever happens to my mind, I mean all times is in my family. The other point that they will talk about this symposium is what can you do if this is in your family? How much do you have control over? How you know? How much is nature nurture kind of thing and how much is what you can do so tomorrow. Mender is is much, very much an advocate of movement and exercise and activity and healthy living, and you know she do not schedule something on her Zuma days because she's not gonna be able to help you. So because she places a priority. And absolutely how many of us, at whatever age, are placing a priority on what am I going to do for me that is going to pay off in a day, a week, a month, twenty years? We're looking, I think so,...

...immediately that. Can we take a long view of what's going to be good, good for our health? Yep, nope. Then that that's a great point and I agree that to it, I think as a person who's now, we know, I'm in my mid s, the thought of losing my independence and having to rely on someone to do things or putting myself as a burden on somebody is definitely something that I would be devastated by. So I would I'm not seeing that. You said before. I don't like I want cancer or everything else. It's just that I don't something that developing my mind to be what it is took me a long time to do and I just I just don't want to see it just go away and become a shell of what I used to be. Right, because the mind runs we you know, we have two things. We have the brain and we have the mind. Right, they're not that. I mean, I think in in in literature and philosophy, they're not always the same there, I don't they. So we've got our brain, always have our brain, but will we got to have our mind? And what happens to our brain? That structure, that physical structure, affects what our mind does. It's really that's you know, this is off we deep conversation after right with US people. Thank you so much for, you know, just something to something to think about. The other thing I kind of want to leave you with is, you know, we talked about, you know, healthy living and and a lot of that has been put for the physical sense, your heart health and things like that. For the last several years, people in in the cardiovascular field, cardio cerebral field, your brain, have talked about what is good for the heart is good for the brain. And if you think about it. What's you know, blood flow to the brain, oxygen to the brain. To think about Hammns. In a stroke, right, we lose the blood, the oxygen that's carried in there. So if you're thinking about making changes for your health, it's not always you know, a muscle, a wasteline. I want to be able to do a run K kind of thing. It's thinking about what also is helping your brain, because that blood's going everywhere in our bodies and next taking that oxygen right everywhere in a body and we want kind of you like high speed rail want any interruptions to get into all the places that it needs to go right now. You know what? I'll end with this too. That's a great point. I've I haven't discussed this a lot, but I have been going back to the gym and I've actually lost all a bit of weight and since I've been back to the gym I do feel better mentally, and not just physically. I not just you know, it's easier to walk around and get around. It's also I just feel like everything's clear in my head. So I totally reread with you. I think it's all it's all related in a way. So I think that's a great point. Patty singer, not only a member of one hundred point nine wx I are, but now a member of the Iheart family with our show. Thank you so much for making the show what it is. I appreciate your input as always, and I appreciate you and appreciate everybody who listens. And don't forget, you have to go to the website. I'm demanding you, but the minority reporter dotnet. Please check out the stories that you heard here and other stories that we did not go into detail about on that site. And you can also send an email to the minority reporter if you want to give your thoughts and opinions and suggestions for stories. And what's that email again? Patty, editor at minority reporter DOTNET. And also you can also go to our website as well, inside the margins, radiocom. All episodes of inside the margins can be found there, as well as links to the minority reporter. Patty. Once again, thank you so much. All right, when we come back, we will discuss the plastic bag band. This is inside the margins. Will be right back. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins. We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Welcome back to inside the margins. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. So a lot of things are happening, and here's one thing that did happened in me because this are in this reminded me of some of the changes that are happening here in New York and in our area here. I went...

...to the store the other day. Now where I live there isn't awakements and if you have been going to Wigman's on a regular basis, you have already been feeling the effects of the plastic bag band and you're probably more prepared than I was. I don't live by awakements and fortunately so I don't get a chance to go to wigments as much as I would like to, but when I do, I has been a whilst have been there. I used to go to like the local tops in my neighborhood and they still have had access to plastic bag so I haven't even thought about the plastic bag band in New York state until just recently when I went to the store and I have bought a bunch of reusable bags, but sometimes I forget them and leave them in my car and then all of a sudden I'm in the store and I have to buy another reusable bag or paper bags. Now, yes, it's an inconvenience, but certainly understand why the Department of Environmental Conservation is trying to, you know, halt all the waste caused by plastic bags. So the band did start a month on Sunday. However, state regulators are going to wait at least a month to enforce it on store owners. So I state officials did say that in recent weeks. That's going to offer grace period the stores as they transition away from plastic bag use as part of the state law that was adopted last year on front of the State Department Environmental Conservation, agreed to wait until at least eight will first to impose any fines on stores that do not comply as part of an ongoing fight brought by plastic bag companies and about Dag out organization. Now, I know there's a lot of arguments on both sides in regards to plastic bags. A lot of people say the cost of paper bags, eggs are the environmental cost of paper bags is outweays the environmental cost of plastic bags because they're heavier to ship over two stores. That's an argument that I don't think as a valid one. I'll tell you why. If you buy reusable bags, then you won't have to use paper bags, and if you don't use paper bags, then they ship less paper bags and there they don't burn all that fuel manufacturing and bringing paper bags over. If we decrease the usage of paper bags, the best way to go about this is to get reusable bags. If you get that, you can reuse the bag over and over again. You're not using paper bags and you're not using plastic bags. Also, the paper bags are made out of a lot of recycled products, so you got to remember that as well. So yes, plastic bags certainly are lighter than paper bags, but just don't use paper bags. And the whole thing to thwart your interest in using paper bags is most stores are charging you to buy the paper bags. So if you buy your reusable bags you will never have to buy paper bags anyway. So in a long run it saves you money in your pocket if you're buying and then I know they're only in nickel, but if you're buying paper bags every single time you go to the store, it will eventually add up. and not to mention the one thing I do not like about paper bags is they they don't have handles. That was the one thing. I'm the guy that I'm all for this and it doesn't really bother me at all. You know as the reasons why they're doing this, but the only thing that is was kind of the pain is the fact that paper bags don't have handles. And if you're...

...like me and you're the one tripper, and do you know I'm talking about, you're the guy that loads up bags to bring them into the house so you don't have to go back to the car for multiple trips. You just want to do it all in one trip. Those handles came in handy right, because you could slide the handles of the bags up your arm, so you could put like four or five bags on each arm and still carry something in the middle and you can walk into the House that way. You can't do that with paper bags. There's no handles. So that's another reason why I forced myself to get recyclable bags. Are Reusable bags. I'm sorry, is because I needed I need to handle. I need to handle my bags for use in personal life, not to mention again. You know, it saves you the cost and the only another downfall that I do see is I do when you're in a rush, a lot of times you will forget the reusable bags. Leave them in your car, all right, and if you do that, your options are to leave everything with the cashier, go back out to your are, get your bags and run back in, which could probably anger people if they've been winning in line for a very long time on a busy Saturday or Sunday morning or afternoon when most people do their shopping, because most people work during the week, so the traffic at grocery stores is usually heavier on the weekends. So it definitely will make you unpopular if you say, Hey, I have to run back to my car, can you just hold all the stuff for a minute, because they're either going to sit there and wait for you to come back before they can do what you got to do, or they'll put you to the side and have someone else going. When you come back, you're pretty much cutting that person or whatever and they start you over. I guess there is there is a thing where they can ring you out or scan your groceries and put it all in the cart for you and then you can just kind of leave the cart there and then get your bags and then bag at yourself. But I'm lazy. I prefer to have the person. It's not I'm not trying to put anybody down, I am just lazy. I don't like to bag my groceries myself. I will go through the cell check out if it's a few items, but if I'm like grocery you know, I have in my household myself, my wife, two young children in a teenager. So when I do shopping for the entire household, we're not talking about one bag of stuff, we're talking about a bunch of stuff and I'm not going to back that myself. If, again, if I'm just going I'm getting, you know, a handful of things or Napkins or something that, sure, I don't care about putting it in the back myself, but when I have a cart full, overflowing a stuff, I'm not going to sit there and buy my own groceries. And I'm lazy. I'm not going to lie and say I'm not. But anyways, that's my rant on the bags here. Just just like I said, I hands up. Make sure that you keep your recyclable or your reusable bags in your car or your vehicle. That way you don't have to buy paper bags every time you go shopping and don't forget to bring them into the store with you. But, as I said before, they are giving stores a one month leniency on that new rule, so some stores may still be carrying plastic bag. So there will be more to come on that. All right, let's go ahead and going to our final break here and when we come back we'll talk about some good news actually from the Rochester City School district. This is Matt Wilson and this is inside the margins. Will be right back. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts,...

...comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom. Welcome back to inside the margin is. I'm your host, Matt Wilson. So the Rochester City School district has been in the news a lot recently. In the majority of the news that we see about the Rochester City School district is not good. A lot of layoffs, a lot of budget cuts, a lot of budget crisis there. So almost every time you hear news it's nothing to smile about. But this is pretty good news, especially for East High School. So East High School and the University of Rochester renew their partnership for another five years. So that's good. You know it. The vote was close. It was a five to two vote with the board members and that came at the end of hours on now board meeting that was hours long and began beget at thirty pm on Thursday and stretch well past midnight. So the University of Roster collaboration is done what it was supposed to do with the school. It it improve outcomes for students at one of rocks, at one of the Rochester City School district's flagship institutions. So here are the numbers at East High School. One time regents passage rates have doubled in math and English. The number of students entering ninth grade with zero graduation credits has fallen by two thirds. Suspensions are down by more than ninety percent and the four year August graduation the four year August graduation rate as increased from thirty three percent to seventy percent. That's a huge increase. So not only is the graduation rate increasing, but the quality of the graduates that the school is producing is increasing as well, according to eeper, according to East upper school principle, marling blocker, she knows that the number of students who have passed the region's exams with higher scores than required have increased. So that these are all good things. But again, as I said before, think it's still at still a challenge because the success has come at a cost. In fact, a report from the State of Education Department show that East received thirty six thousand dollars per pupil in two thousand and eighteen through nineteen, and that is by far the highest sum in the district and one of the highest in the state. So it is expensive to make this work. Special education enrollment is at fifteen percent this year. That was down from twenty five percent in two thousand and thirteen. Two Thousand and fourteen English English language learners make up twelve percent. That's down from twenty percent, and there are fewer students in poverty as well, though they still make up an overwhelming majority. So there's still a lot of things that need to be worked on at the school. So it's not all roses and rainbows there. There's still are going to be some challenges, and one of those challenges is absenteeism. So check this out. Among acadet academic markers, absoluteeism is one major remaining challenge. Last year, thirty nine percent of lower school students, and that's grades six through eight, and fifty three percent of upper school students were categorized as chronically absent, and that number is likely the main limiting factor in...

...the school's continued improvement is that all the best practices for getting students to school, like home visits, providing food and bus passes, making combinations and student schedules, partnerships with local agencies, are already in place. In fact that it leaves upper school principal, Marlene blocker, baffled. She actually said in the Democrat and chronicle I honestly don't know what else to do. And according to board President Van White, he is the partnerships lot of shoeleader. He believes that the answer is to keep working on the problem, even if it requires greater resources. So, as we were talking about the expenses, his answer is, and this is what van White said to the Democratic Chronicle. These are his words. If you say it's too expensive, then ask yourself our our children worth it, because I've never heard of anyone complaining about how much we spend per person at the Monroe County jail or Attica. Are Our children not worthy of investment in gains through a strategy that has proven capable of doing what no other strategy has done? So this is how I look at this. Yes, there are still some challenges that the school is going to have to face and obviously absenteeism is not a good thing. If your child is not going to school, that they are not learning, and that's point blank period. You cannot debate that. You're going to miss out on a lot of things if you don't show up to school. However, that increased graduation rate is remarkable, but it does take money to do this and, as I discussed earlier, thirty nine thousand dollars per student. That's a lot of money. That's more than some people's salary a year right, and that's per child that goes there. That's why the budget cuts scare me so much and I don't know, obviously I'm not part of the school board and I don't know the answers, but in order to fix problems with the schools, it usually requires money and manpower, and if you take away money and you take away manpower you're going to have a failing system. You cannot support hundreds of children with minimal resources. And I don't have the answers as to how we get those resources. I don't know, but I am sick and tired of everyone telling me I'll terrible. The Rochester City School district is. I don't like that. I do live in the outskirts of Rochester now, but I was born and raised partially in Rochester. I I moved to the suburbs the end of my fifth grade year. My brother, I believe he was in the city school district until seventh grade and my younger brother didn't really have a chance to experience the city school district. But I tell you what some of my fine missed childhood memories is when I was a child at school number thirty nine, right of Palmery Street, right which is off of Portland Avenue in the city. I loved it. I had a lot made a lot of friends there. I love that school. I love my teachers. It was great. I think the city school district has a lot of potential to being great, to being fantastic, and just the partnership with the you of...

...our and east high shows how much potential there is when you do stuff like that. But again, it takes money and it takes manpower and and not every single high school is going to get that treatment, not every single school in the city is going to get that treatment and without those resources they're going to fail. So that's what we need to figure out. Is it possible to take money from something else and put it into the education of our children, because the children are always going to be our future. I'm not going to be around forever, but my children are going to be around much longer than I'm going to be around. No one's to be around forever, obviously, but my kids are the ones. We're going to be part of the oncoming future and the people who influence the great things of the world are going to be from our children and we want to make sure that they are treated well and they are giving given every single opportunity to grow and to flourish and to be successful. We owe that to them. And if you're afraid of people leaving Rochester, if you're afraid of people moving away, if you have bad school system, that's really going to detour anyone from staying here. Right. That's one of the main things people look for when they move to an area is how good is the school because I want my child to have the best education. So if you have bad numbers as a school system and you're talking about more budget cuts and firing more teachers, that's going to detour people from wanting to be part of the school district and they're going to move to other places. We don't want that. So this is something that's to me. It's very important. It's it's a reason why I unfortunately don't live the city. I want to live in it, in the city, but my wife scared to live in the city because she's scared of the school system. And I don't that you. I love the city of Rochester, New York, but I understand her fears. Also, of course, she wants the best for your children, and so do I. All right, like I said, there's a lot of work that needs to be done there, but I am happy to see all the progress that East and the U of are making with that school. All right, that will do it for this week's edition of inside the margins. I want to remind you again that we are available in podcast format now on the iheartradio network. So you can go to Iheart radiocom or you can download the APP on your device or, even easier, just go to our website inside the margins radiocom. Every single podcast of our show is there. So podcast format, don't forget as also it's commercial free, it's music break free. It's just pretty much the meat of the show, unless, of course, we have an ar something, then we will play your music, but other than that, if you go to our website at Iheart Radio, I'm sorry, if you go to our website at inside the margins Radiocom, you can listen to any episode that you want and also available on the IHEART radio APP. All right, that will do it for this week's edition of inside the margins. I will see you next time. It's Matt Wilson sign off. This is inside the margins. Do you have a topic that you would like to discussed on inside the margins? We would love to hear from you. Please send your thoughts, comments or questions to inside margins at gmailcom.

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